Articles

A number of articles have been posted here under various categories - articles related to the outdoors, safety, gear, food, humour plus many other areas. Articles will be added to this collection periodically. If you would like to write an article, then please let us know at admin@myccr.com as we are always happy to publish new articles

by Richard Munn|Published 00-00-0000
Most wilderness paddlers have mixed feelings about bears. On one hand, the sighting of a bear is cause for excitement. It's a very real indication to us that we've left the city behind and are now in a wilderness area. However, when we encounter any animal large enough to potentially cause injury , there is an element of fear involved also. There's always a bit of discomfort in knowing that we're...
by Richard Munn|Published 00-00-0000
  Very simply, hypothermia is the condition where the body is losing heat faster than its "internal furnace" can regenerate it. This loss of body heat causes impaired motor skills and judgment, and if untreated can be fatal. People tend to think of hypothermia as a winter problem.  We think of the unfortunate souls who get lost in the winter and "die of exposure...
by John Griffiths|Published 07-07-2006
    Take an old collapsing water container and cut off the top. It will now fold down into a flat piece. When filled with water it will sit flat and hold a lot of dishes. I put a grommet in one side and tied a piece of cord through it so you can hang it up to dry. If you make the cord the right length it will go around the bucket when folded, and hold it together for storage. Works...
by Dave Nodwell|Published 07-21-2006
  For years I have brought along my "Bear Rig" for suspending food packs up in trees. This makes it a lot easier to crank those heavy packs over a branch. In fact, I can get food packs for 4 people suspended from a tree by myself with no problem.   I bring two lengths of rope, one with a pulley on the end. The pulley serves as a great weight for throwing the rope over the...
by Neil E. Miller|Published 10-03-2008
     A North American’s Perspective        Churchill once described the differences between the British and the Americans as two people separated by a common language.  I think perhaps the Canadians and the Americans are two people separated by a common culture.  Our ways of life seem much the same on the surface but our priorities both...
by Neil E. Miller|Published 09-12-2008
  Farmer John meets Starburst        Before the start of Day One and our trial (by water) involving basic boat-handling, we had to stand informal inspection to be certain we had the proper clothing for the conditions and to select the crux piece of gear:  the boat.  At the pre-arranged time, we showed up at the meeting on the deck, outside of the dining...
by Richard Munn|Published 00-00-0000
Sometimes a product comes along that forces us to think "outside of the box," and in the case the box we're encouraged to think outside of is the tent we're used to sleeping in. Oh, My Aching (Aging) Back! As the years go flying by, I'm finding myself paying more attention to the weight I'm carrying while I'm canoeing, hiking or snowshoeing. Not that I'm not able to carry the food pack...
by Richard Munn|Published 07-12-2006
Most of us believe that bannock is a traditional native food that was adapted by European fur traders. In fact, it's the other way around. In many parts of North America, Native people had no access to flour prior to the arrival of European traders, although some flour substitutes existed, like wild turnips or corn, dried and ground to a powder. Bannock actually has its culinary roots in Scotland...
by CCR Members|Published 07-07-2006
 The Murphy's Law adaptations (and corollaries) below were submitted by various site users. Thanks for your participation in this. The moose always shows up right after you put the camera back in the Pelican Case. Whenever a comment is made about how great it is to be out in the wilderness and not see ANYBODY, 14 blue canoes full of shouting high school students will...
by Richard Munn|Published 07-21-2006
Low head dams have resulted in so many close calls and fatalities that they have earned themselves the name "drowning machine." What Are They? Low head dams are control structures used on rivers. As with all dams, they partially block the waterway and "back up" the water behind them, helping maintain water levels. Simple in design, they are self-regulating and allow water to...

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