North

Regions for filing Yukon Routes


Primarily to minimize cross-listing, I use four regions based on drainage basins. 



North 

Coverage. 

Almost everything starting in Canada north of the Yukon basin. 

Explicit inclusions.

Ogilvie, Peel, Hart, Wind, Bonnet Plume, Snake, Firth, Blackstone, Porcupine, Eagle, Bell and Little Bell Rivers. 

Explicit exclusion.

Rat River (entries are posted in NT, Mackenzie region). 



Pacific 

Coverage. 

Waters flowing into the Pacific Ocean. 

Explicit inclusions.

Alsek River, Tatshenshini River, ... 



Liard 

Coverage. 

Liard River and its basin. 

Explicit inclusions.

Liard River, Meister River, Frances River, Hyland River, Cool River, Smith River, Crow River, Beaver River, ...



Yukon 

Coverage. 

Yukon River and its basin. 

Explicit inclusions.

Yukon River, Ross River, Pelly River, Teslin River, Hess River, Big Salmon River, Little Salmon River, White River, Stewart River, South Macmillan River, ... 

Explicit exclusion.

Porcupine River (entries are posted in the Yukon North region). 



 

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North

Arctic Ocean. Inuvik, Herschel Island, AK border. Notes.
Herschel Island Qikiqtaruk Territorial Park.
http://www.env.gov.yk.ca/parksconservat ... qtaruk.php
http://www.yukonweb.com/notebook/tparks.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herschel_Island
etc.
Source: Madsen, Ken and Peter Mather. A Guide to Paddling in the Yukon. Primrose Publishing (Caribou Commons Project), Whitehorse (2004).
Route description: Inuvik, Mackenzie River and delta, Shallow Bay, Beaufort Sea, Shingle Point, Blow River mouth, Running River mouth, another Shingle Point, Phillips Bay (mouths of Tulugag and Babbage Rivers), Spring River mouth, Herschel Island and Territorial Park, Firth River mouth, Clarence Lagoon, AK border.

Blackstone River. Online, Notes, Photos.
Access: two points on the Dempster Highway.
Egress: by float plane on the Peel River, at Canyon Creek; or portage Aberdeen Canyon and continue on the Peel.
Author: Christian Roux.
http://translate.google.com/#fr|en|
http://www.cgrizz.com/blackstone/black0.htm
http://www.cgrizz.com/blackstone/yallerblack.htm

Blackstone River. Dempster Highway to Ogilvie River and start of Peel River. Guide.
Source: Peepre, Juri and Sarah Locke. Wild Rivers of the Yukon’s Peel Watershed. Whitehorse (2008).

Blackstone River. Dempster Highway to Ogilvie River and start of Peel River. Notes.
Source: Madsen, Ken and Peter Mather. A Guide to Paddling in the Yukon. Primrose Publishing (Caribou Commons Project), Whitehorse (2004).

Bonnet Plume River. Information.
Canadian Heritage Rivers System.
http://www.chrs.ca/Rivers/BonnetPlume/BonnetPlume_e.htm
The Wind, the Snake and the Bonnet Plume: Three Wild Northern Rivers. Yukon Wildlands Project.
Ed note: Coffee-table book; available at
http://www.yukonbooks.com
Three Rivers: The Yukon’s Great Boreal Wilderness. Harbour Publishing, Madeira Park (2005). Ed note: Coffee-table book.

Bonnet Plume River. Features.
To be prepared.

Bonnet Plume River and Peel River. Bonnet Plume Lake to Fort McPherson. Online, Guide.
Source: Charles Leduc library (cartespleinair).
Authors: Alain Lacroix and Mélanie Boudreau.
Route description: Bonnet Plume Lake, Bonnet Plume River, Peel River, Snake River confluence (and Taco Bar), Dempster Highway, Fort McPherson.
Contents: 3 pages of text (French), 34 pages of annotated maps: 10 hikes, campsites (size & quality), rapids (rated) and portages. Ed note: BRAVO!
http://translate.google.com/#fr|en|
http://www.cartespleinair.org/Canot/Can ... au2006.pdf

Bonnet Plume River. Bonnet Plume Lake to Peel River junction. Guide.
Source: Peepre, Juri and Sarah Locke. Wild Rivers of the Yukon’s Peel Watershed. Whitehorse (2008).

Bonnet Plume River and Peel River. Bonnet Plume Lake to Fort McPherson. Notes.
Source: Thomas, Alister. Canada’s Best Canoe Routes.. Boston Mills Press, Erin (2001).
Author: Paula Zybach.
Route description: Bonnet Plume Lake (by float plane from Fort McPherson), Bonnet Plume River, Peel River, Fort McPherson.
Title at source: Bonnet Plume River: A River Gone Mad.

Bonnet Plume River. Bonnet Plume Lake to Peel River junction. Notes.
Source: Madsen, Ken and Peter Mather. A Guide to Paddling in the Yukon. Primrose Publishing (Caribou Commons Project), Whitehorse (2004).
Route description (incomplete): Bonnet Plume Lake by float plane, Rockslide Canyon, canyon, creek confluences (Goz, Kohse), Peel River junction.

Eagle River, Bell River and Porcupine River. Online, Notes, Photos.
Access: Dempster Highway, north of Eagle Plains.
Egress: flight from Old Crow.
Author: Christian Roux.
http://translate.google.com/#fr|en|
http://www.cgrizz.com/eagle/eagle0.htm
http://www.cgrizz.com/eagle/yallereagle.htm

Eagle River. Dempster Highway to Bell River junction. Notes.
Source: Madsen, Ken and Peter Mather. A Guide to Paddling in the Yukon. Primrose Publishing (Caribou Commons Project), Whitehorse (2004).
Ed note: Continue to the Porcupine River and the settlement of Old Crow.

Firth River. Margaret Lake to the Arctic Ocean at Herschel Island. Notes.
Ivvavik National Park.
http://www.pc.gc.ca/pn-np/yt/ivvavik/index.aspx
http://www.pc.gc.ca/pn-np/yt/ivvavik/na ... tcul2.aspx
http://www.greatcanadianparks.com/yukon ... /index.htm
Ed note: Serious (CIV) ww river.
Source: Madsen, Ken and Peter Mather. A Guide to Paddling in the Yukon. Primrose Publishing (Caribou Commons Project), Whitehorse (2004).
Route description: Margaret Lake, creek confluences (Muskeg, Joe, Mountain, Wolf, Sheep), canyon (includes Glacier, Canyon, Caribou? and Camping Creek confluences), creek confluences (Lonely, Kugaryuk), delta, Arctic Ocean and Herschel Island.

Hart River. Elliott Lake to Peel River junction. Guide.
Source: Peepre, Juri and Sarah Locke. Wild Rivers of the Yukon’s Peel Watershed. Whitehorse (2008).

Hart River. Online, Notes, Photos.
Access: Hart Lake (?) or Elliott Lake (via Elliott Creek).
Egress: by float plane on the Peel River, at Canyon Creek; or portage Aberdeen Canyon and continue on the Peel.
Author: Christian Roux.
http://translate.google.com/#fr|en|
http://www.cgrizz.com/hart/hart0.htm
http://www.cgrizz.com/hart/yallerhart.htm

Little Bell River, Bell River and Porcupine River. Summit Lake to Old Crow. Online, Notes, Photos.
Author: Christian Roux.
http://translate.google.com/#fr|en|
http://www.cgrizz.com/bell/bell0.htm
http://www.cgrizz.com/bell/yallerbell.htm

Little Bell River and Bell River. Summit Lake to Porcupine River junction. Notes.
Source: Madsen, Ken and Peter Mather. A Guide to Paddling in the Yukon. Primrose Publishing (Caribou Commons Project), Whitehorse (2004).
Route description: Summit Lake, Little Bell River, Bell River junction, Rat River (the other one) confluence, Eagle River confluence, Porcupine River junction.

Ogilvie River and Peel River. Online, Guide.
Source: NT Government library.
Route description: Dempster Highway, Ogilvie River, Blackstone River confluence and start of the Peel River, Hart River confluence, Aberdeen Canyon and Falls, Wind River confluence, Bonnet Plume River confluence, Snake River confluence, Trail River confluence, Fort McPherson or Inuvik.
http://spectacularnwt.com/sites/stage.s ... lriver.pdf

Ogilvie River. Dempster Highway to Blackstone River and start of Peel River. Guide.
Source: Peepre, Juri and Sarah Locke. Wild Rivers of the Yukon’s Peel Watershed. Whitehorse (2008).

Ogilvie River. Dempster Highway to Blackstone River junction and start of Peel River. Notes.
Source: Madsen, Ken and Peter Mather. A Guide to Paddling in the Yukon. Primrose Publishing (Caribou Commons Project), Whitehorse (2004).

Ogilvie River, Peel River, Fort McPherson; Summit Lake, Little Bell River, Bell River, Porcupine River, Old Crow. Notes.
Source: Thomas, Alister. More of Canada’s Best Canoe Routes. Boston Mills Press, Erin (2003).
Author: Faye Hallett.
Route description: Dempster Highway, Ogilvie River, Peel River, Aberdeen Canyon, Wind River mouth, Bonnet Plume River mouth, Snake River mouth, Fort McPherson, up Rat River part way; flood-forced retreat to Fort McPherson; float plane to Summit Lake; Little Bell River, Bell River, Porcupine River, Old Crow; flight to Dawson.
Title at source: Rat-Peel-Porcupine Rivers: Rediscovering Historical Roots and Routes.

Peel River. Information.
The Peel is not often paddled by itself, partly because the impassable Aberdeen canyon requires a lengthy portage.
Consult also entries filed under
Blackstone River,
Ogilvie River,
Hart River,
Wind River,
Bonnet Plume River and
Snake River.

Peel River. Blackstone-Ogilvie to Fort McPherson. Guide.
Source: Peepre, Juri and Sarah Locke. Wild Rivers of the Yukon’s Peel Watershed. Whitehorse (2008).

Peel River. Ogilvie-Blackstone junction to Dempster Highway. Notes.
Source: Madsen, Ken and Peter Mather. A Guide to Paddling in the Yukon. Primrose Publishing (Caribou Commons Project), Whitehorse (2004).
Route description: Peel River start at the Ogilvie-Blackstone junction, Hart River confluence, Aberdeen Canyon, Wind River confluence, Bonnet Plume River confluence, Peel Canyon, Snake River confluence (common egress point at the “Taco Bar”), Caribou River confluence, Dempster Highway.

Porcupine River. Miner-Whitestone junction to Old Crow. Features.
Ed note: To be expanded.
Junction of Miner River and Whitestone River, Bell River confluence, Driftwood River confluence, Old Crow River and Old Crow settlement.

Porcupine River. Old Crow to Fort Yukon AK. Online, Notes, Photos.
Author: Christian Roux.
http://translate.google.com/#fr|en|
http://www.cgrizz.com/index.htm
(click on Porcupine River, then on En savoir plus.

Porcupine River. Bell River confluence to Old Crow. Notes.
Source: Madsen, Ken and Peter Mather. A Guide to Paddling in the Yukon. Primrose Publishing (Caribou Commons Project), Whitehorse (2004).

Snake River. Information.
The Wind, the Snake and the Bonnet Plume: Three Wild Northern Rivers. Yukon Wildlands Project. Available at http://www.yukonbooks.com . Ed note: Coffee-table book.
Three Rivers: The Yukon’s Great Boreal Wilderness. Harbour Publishing, Madeira Park (2005). Ed note: Coffee-table book.

Snake River and Peel River. Duo Lake to Dempster Highway. Online, Journal.
Source: Kayak Yukon library.
Author: Tim Gregg.
Route description: Duo Lakes, Snake River, Peel River, Dempster Highway.
http://www.kayak.yk.ca/html/rivers/snake/index.html

Snake River and Peel River, from Duo Lake. Online, Notes, Photos.
Access: float plane from Mayo to Duo Lakes.
Egress: various points on the Peel River.
Author: Christian Roux.
http://translate.google.com/#fr|en|
http://www.cgrizz.com/snake/snake0.htm
http://www.cgrizz.com/snake/yallersnake.htm

Snake River. Online, Photos.
Author: Chris Lepard.
Ed note: Photos only.
http://chrislepard.com/root/ChrisLepard ... /main2.cfm

Snake River. Duo Lake to Peel River junction. Guide.
Source: Peepre, Juri and Sarah Locke. Wild Rivers of the Yukon’s Peel Watershed. Whitehorse (2008).

Snake River. Duo Lakes to Peel River junction. Notes.
Source: Madsen, Ken and Peter Mather. A Guide to Paddling in the Yukon. Primrose Publishing (Caribou Commons Project), Whitehorse (2004).
Route description: Duo Lakes by float plane, portage to the Snake River, Peel River junction.

Wind River. Information.
The Wind, the Snake and the Bonnet Plume: Three Wild Northern Rivers. Yukon Wildlands Project. Available at http://www.yukonbooks.com . Ed note: Coffee-table book.
Three Rivers: The Yukon’s Great Boreal Wilderness. Harbour Publishing, Madeira Park (2005). Ed note: Coffee-table book.

Wind River. McClusky Lake to Peel River junction. Guide.
Source: Peepre, Juri and Sarah Locke. Wild Rivers of the Yukon’s Peel Watershed. Whitehorse (2008).

Wind River and Peel River; McClusky Lake to Snake River. Online, Photos.
Author: Ted Parker.
Content: Photos plus brief commentary.
Route description: McClusky Lake (by float plane from Mayo, reached by road from Whitehorse), Wind River, Peel River, Bonnet Plume River confluence, Snake River confluence, Taco Bar, float plane to Mayo.
http://www.parkerclan.ca/windriver.php

Wind River and Peel River; from McClusky Lake. Online, Journal.
Source: Kayak Yukon library
Author: Tim Gregg.
http://www.kayak.yk.ca/html/rivers/wind/index.html

Wind River and Peel River; from McClusky Lake. Online, Notes, Photos.
Egress: various points on the Peel River.
Author: Christian Roux.
http://translate.google.com/#fr|en|
http://www.cgrizz.com/Wind/wind0.htm
http://www.cgrizz.com/Wind/yallerwind.htm

Wind River. McClusky Lake to Peel River junction. Notes.
Source: Madsen, Ken and Peter Mather. A Guide to Paddling in the Yukon. Primrose Publishing (Caribou Commons Project), Whitehorse (2004).
Route description: McClusky Lake, creek, Wind River, Bond Creek confluence, Bear River confluence, Royal Creek confluence, Little Wind River confluence, creek confluences (Illtyd, Hungry, Basin, Beaver), Peel River junction.