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PostPosted: December 15th, 2012, 6:18 am 
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Joined: August 29th, 2007, 11:29 am
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Has anyone paddled this stretch of ocean? Is it feasible in a canoe with spray deck, rather than sea kayak?
Many things to consider I know, but any information on tidal ranges, and whether mud flats force you a long way off-shore?


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PostPosted: December 15th, 2012, 6:13 pm 
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Joined: September 19th, 2003, 8:46 am
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this book will supply information

http://www.amazon.com/Kabloona-Yellow-K ... 0888012187


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PostPosted: December 15th, 2012, 11:51 pm 
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Joined: September 29th, 2005, 5:57 pm
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Hello John -

I know of a couple of canoe trips along this coastline.

George Luste paddled from Bathurst Inlet to Kuglugtuk in 1996 – this article shows the route but no details on this section of a long solo trip:

http://news.ourontario.ca/Nastawgan/123421/page/2?n=

Paul vanPeenen, Kuglugtuk to Bathurst Inlet in 2001 after paddling the Coppermine. Brief article here:

http://www.clippercanoes.com/artic.php

If you send me a PM I will forward you Paul’s e-mail.

Good luck,

-jmc


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PostPosted: January 11th, 2013, 8:42 pm 
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Joined: January 24th, 2009, 12:14 pm
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Hi John,

We paddled (or rather pulled our kayaks on the ice) from Kugluktuk to Bathurst Inlet as part of a longer trip to Taloyoak in 2011. We left Kugluktuk June 11th and pulled the kayaks for the first three weeks, occasionally being able to paddle shore leads and areas near the mouths of larger rivers. Obviously if you were only going as far as Bathurst Inlet you would leave much later. We were able to paddle uninterrupted from Wollaston Point (July 5th) onward. Bathurst Inlet was almost completely clear of ice by then.

The trip itself is extremely beautiful and well worth doing. The latter half of June and first half of July are really the nicest time to be in the area, owing to the beautiful flowers and breeding birds. Lots of Muskox and Caribou during that part of the trip.

There is very little difference between high and low tide in the Coronation Gulf and there are no currents, so you shouldn't have a problem in that regard. When we were able to paddle sections where larger rivers entered, we never had to swing away from the shore. The strongest winds were from storms coming from the northwest - you wouldn't want to be on the water during those occasions (but they didn't affect us, as we were pulling the kayaks over the ice). The most common winds (on the entire trip) were from the east and they usually were associated with good weather (they generally didn't exceed 10 - 20 kph)

You can see some photos here: http://agguanittuq.wordpress.com/

Have fun,
Bob


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PostPosted: January 16th, 2013, 11:41 am 
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Joined: August 29th, 2007, 11:29 am
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Thank you Bob and everyone else for the great help. It sounds a beautiful bit of coast, and do-able in a canoe with deck. I'll let you know how it goes.


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PostPosted: March 25th, 2013, 9:43 am 
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Joined: February 8th, 2006, 5:17 pm
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john harrison wrote:
Has anyone paddled this stretch of ocean? Is it feasible in a canoe with spray deck, rather than sea kayak?
Many things to consider I know, but any information on tidal ranges, and whether mud flats force you a long way off-shore?

Hi John:

Just saw this. And The Saunders great trips.

In 1996 I paddled solo in a prospector canoe - with removable spray deck - from Great Slave Lake to Bathurst Inlet and then to Kugluktuk.

The Coronation Gulf part from Bathurst Inlet to Kugluktuk was great - with very nice shore and ample islands. Very enjoyable part. I did sit out wind and waves a number of times. My most nervous part was crossing Arctic Sound (Bay?) at the top rather than going around on shore. My most dangerous moment was having the canoe seat bolt snap and send me over backwards in the canoe and almost swamping while fighting the waves. (After that I had a backup shelf made under the seat - to catch if it ever again goes the same via the hanging part.)

Tides are minor (compared to Ungava Bay trips) - and I did recall a stretch where there were rock shelfs coming out from shore for some distance - that causes substantial waves breaking from the ocean swells - swells themselves are easy to do - I managed ok. And carry enough fresh water in the canoe so that if you have to land where there is no fresh water and get windbound - you can still enjoy the time.

Rather than say "good luck" - I prefere to say may you have "the absence of bad luck".

Best wishes.

George


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