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 Post subject: Oberholtzer-Magee, 1912
PostPosted: August 12th, 2017, 1:02 pm 
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Was this first recreational party to paddle in the barrenlands?
http://www.wilderness.net/NWPS/Oberholtzer
http://canoeing.com/celebrating-the-obe ... udson-bay/
http://arcticjournal.ca/bound-for-the-barrens/ , etc
Bound for the Barrens: Journal of the Ernest Oberholtzer & Bill Magee 2,000-mile Canoe Voyage to Hudson Bay in 1912. Edited by Jean Sanford Replinger with Nancy Paddock.
.

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PostPosted: August 13th, 2017, 10:05 pm 
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Not sure...but David Pelly's book "The Old Way North" is a must read...thanks for those links they are great.


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PostPosted: August 13th, 2017, 11:34 pm 
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Allan -

"Recreational" may not be that easy to define, but I assume you want to eliminate priests, fur traders, geologists and prospectors.

I think David Hanbury predated Oberholtzer by a decade or so, although not all his travels in the Barrens were by canoe. In the west, "recreational" musk ox hunters like Warburton Pike, Henry Toke Munn, and Caspar Whitney (Hubbard's editor at Outing magazine) all penetrated the Barrens north of Great Slave in the 1880s and 1890s. Again, not all of their travels were by canoe. And Ernest Thompson Seton's trip to Aylmer Lake ("The Arctic Prairies") also predates Oberholtzer.

-jmc


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PostPosted: August 14th, 2017, 12:34 pm 
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"Canoeing north into the unknown" by Hodgins and Hoyle is a database of old canoe trips. I'm guessing Ernest Oberholtzer had more in common with modern paddlers than the wealthy hunters. Hanbury's book appears to be online (IN this narrative I have endeavoured to give a plain and unvarnished account of twenty months' journeying through the Northland of Canada. The book deals with sport and travel, no attempt having been made to accomplish elaborate geographical or other scientific work..). Hanbury's obit from 1910 (also online) describes him as the son of an Earl.


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PostPosted: August 14th, 2017, 8:24 pm 
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Thanks, guys, not a good post on my part.

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PostPosted: August 14th, 2017, 10:46 pm 
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Hornby, regardless of personal opinions on the guy, was "surviving" on the barrens NW of Oberholtzer's journey, a few years earlier too...Guy Blanchet, on downtime from surveying spent time exploring the eastern barrens...I would put his trip around Dubawnt area in a similar "recreational" category as Oberholtzer's...personal motivation...albeit it was a decade or so later in time...another great read "the Northern Horizons" for anyone out there that hasn't read it.


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PostPosted: August 15th, 2017, 12:13 am 
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Nothing wrong with your post, Allan. I think it was quite thought provoking. I agree with paddlenorth that Oberholtzer's motivations were likely closer to those of most northern paddlers today than those of some of the others mentioned. I think the "canoe trip" was his focus, while to the others the canoe was just a means to an end.

I'm not sure about Hornby - while he was in the Great Bear Lake area with Cosmo Melvill just prior to the Oberholtzer expedition, their efforts also included some trading activity, and I'm not sure they were as "recreational" as Oberholtzer. His more well known (and finally fatal) expeditions tool place after the first world war.

-jmc


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PostPosted: August 15th, 2017, 5:28 pm 
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Eric Sevareid's 'Canoeing with the Cree' was a read I enjoyed.


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PostPosted: August 15th, 2017, 9:30 pm 
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i agree - I thought the post was an interesting question. Like Downes and Severeid, I think there's a lot I can identify with in Oberholtzer, and there's a good case for him and Magee being the first recreational paddlers on the barrens. He has a biography - Keepers of the Wild, which I can recommend. -Andy

His coffee table book is amazing (Toward Magnetic North).


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PostPosted: August 17th, 2017, 9:28 am 
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Read both Edgar Christian and Ernest Oberholtzer. Hornby would never have seen this photo Image


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PostPosted: August 19th, 2017, 8:35 am 
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Oberholtzer-Magee was the first recreational trip to what is now Nunavut?

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