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PostPosted: August 14th, 2018, 6:56 pm 
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Good day MYCCR community.

I’m looking for some advice on if this Canoe is worth fixing up?

It was a bit of an impulse buy :lol:

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Then I figured I need to take stock of what is there and work out what needs doing and realistically how much it is going to cost vs buying a decent 2nd hand one.

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Would you fix it up? I realise it will need at least new gunwales, patching up at the bow and paint.

I’m worried if I start it I’ll have to finish and that it may end up costing more then getting a decent 2nd hand one.

Can anyone identify it? It’s approximately 16’6 and I cannot locate a HIN..

Thanks in advance.


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PostPosted: August 14th, 2018, 7:38 pm 
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Joined: March 23rd, 2006, 11:21 pm
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Location: Burns Lake, BC
I'm guessing it's better than the one you have. So yes.

A bit of grinding, a little fiberglass work, and some painting.
If you can't save the gunnels then buy some 1"-1 1/4" x 20' pvc pipe for an easy bombproof fix.

$100 tops.

When you find a better one then sell this for $75 + cost of fixing.
Some other person without a canoe will gladly pay $175 for a sound canoe.


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PostPosted: August 14th, 2018, 8:41 pm 
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Canoeheadted wrote:
I'm guessing it's better than the one you have. So yes.

A bit of grinding, a little fiberglass work, and some painting.
If you can't save the gunnels then buy some 1"-1 1/4" x 20' pvc pipe for an easy bombproof fix.

$100 tops.

When you find a better one then sell this for $75 + cost of fixing.
Some other person without a canoe will gladly pay $175 for a sound canoe.


Thanks for the advice, I hadn’t thought of using PVC pipe. The gunwales are completely shot, i can only assume the canoe has been stored upside down in a swamp.

From what’s left of them, it appears to have originaly been just a 1x1” ash strip with a cut down the middle to accept the hull. I don’t feel as though this would be that hard to remanufacture assuming I can source some cheap hardwood...


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PostPosted: August 14th, 2018, 8:56 pm 
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If you are capable of doing it why not? Though that should have been free IMO that's pretty rough and looks like it was not a good brand name canoe to begin with.

It does look a little like a Scott but those usually have the metal strip on the bow and stern - and yes Rolf just told me in another recent post what those are called but I cannot remember :-) And the seats don't look right for a Scott even if those are replacement seats.


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PostPosted: August 14th, 2018, 9:45 pm 
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Location: Geraldton, Ontario Can
New gunwales, patch work, decks, paint job........but it will still be the old lipstick on a pig thing.


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PostPosted: August 14th, 2018, 9:58 pm 
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Prospector16 wrote:
It does look a little like a Scott but those usually have the metal strip on the bow and stern .


Like this?


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RHaslam wrote:
New gunwales, patch work, decks, paint job........but it will still be the old lipstick on a pig thing.


Yeah this is what I thought..


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PostPosted: August 15th, 2018, 6:50 am 
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No the metal strip on the Scott is sort of like a skid plate - in that picture it would go from the screw along the bow or stern and extend about 18 inches or so along the bottom. It would be perpendicular to that one.


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PostPosted: August 15th, 2018, 11:59 am 
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Joined: September 21st, 2006, 8:41 pm
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Location: Brampton, Ontario
I agree with Prospector, this canoe should have been free. It's condition is a canoe that you would put dirt in and plant flowers at the cottage.
But if your willing to put in several hours, or many several hours..lol and have the patience and skillset, it is a good fixer upper project for sure. You can fix the gunnels and all the rest of it with an epoxy filler compound. Marine Tex, if you like DIY and have not heard of this, it is the secret epoxy product that those of us in the Yachting world use to repair things when there is no time for resin layups, its awesome!! can be used on anything including repairing steel, wood, plastic, fiberglass, you name it. can be drilled and tapped, sanded down, painted pretty much used in any application. The rest is just patchwork a good sanding and some paint/gelcoat.
Marine Tex will patch that old junker in no time, try it you'll love it.

All depends on how much you want to invest in material and time if it is worth it to you.

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Last edited by Captaincanadian on August 16th, 2018, 7:16 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: August 15th, 2018, 12:30 pm 
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It did come with these paddles which look in good shape and is partly why I thought it was a fair price.

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I will look into marine tex - thanks for tip capt.


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PostPosted: August 15th, 2018, 4:36 pm 
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Location: Geraldton, Ontario Can
Well, if you don't have a canoe, it can be salvaged. It is what canoe snobs refer to as a "Chopper". Doesn't mean it's a bad ass bike, means that the fiberglass is chopped up and sprayed into the form. Generally, choppers are considered to be the lowest quality fiberglass canoes, although I have seen them live on for decades after horrible abuse.

I restored one fairy similar to the one you have, and when i was done, it looked like a million bucks.

First thing to do would be to strip all the wood off it. Basic gunwales are very easy to make if you have access to a table saw. Buy a piece of finished hardwood from your local home depot or some other such store. Cut the board in to 3/4 inch strips. Google "scarf joints" and glue the pieces to full length gunwales. Sand them down and oil them, or varnish them, whichever gunwale school you are from.

While your gunwales are curing, sand the outside hull, use some of that marine tex stuff, or a similar product to fill in those holes and scrapes. Sand them down when it dries, then just use good old tremclad from crappy tire. You won't need more than a quart, should do two or three coats easily. If you roll it on with a sponge roller and tip it off with a sponge brush it will come out awesome. Red will make your canoe go faster, and increase re-sale value.

Re-attach your gunwales now. You don't really need new decks unless you want it to look great. Instead you can use about a six inch piece of your hardwood, about an inch and a half wide, and install grab handles at the bow and stern. These will assist with carrying it, and also add some stability to the hull.

Personally, I'd add a stern thwart about 20 inches forward of the stern seat, and a bow thwart, about three inches behind the bow seat. These should be hardwood too. If you take out those fugly seats, and make some basic seats covered with webbing, things will really start to shape up.

This could all be done in a day or two if you have materials at hand. Have fun!


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PostPosted: August 15th, 2018, 6:27 pm 
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RHaslam wrote:
This could all be done in a day or two if you have materials at hand. Have fun!


Thanks for taking the time to reply in such detail. Very useful information there.

Well I have ordered some Marine Tex as a start! Going to shop around for the hardwood, and hopefully pick some up cheap.

Is this the normal method for joining the inwale and outwale with the hull?

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PostPosted: August 15th, 2018, 6:34 pm 
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Location: Geraldton, Ontario Can
That is one way, and looks nice when you do it, but I wouldn't bother with it on a fiberglass canoe. Just make the inwale and outwale the same, level them with the fiberglass and screw them on. Put the inner gunwale on first with some small half inch screws. Then you can attach the outer by either screwing from the inner gunwale out, or from the outwale in. I prefer to go from the inside so there are few visible screws on the outwale.

Or you can just glue them on, which seems pretty popular, but not a building trait I follow.


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PostPosted: August 16th, 2018, 9:05 am 
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Thanks for the advise RHaslam.

What’s the best way to strip this thing? It was originally red then painted green. Is it safe to use paint stripper to remove the green coating or do I have to sand it all off.. i know it will still need sanding in before paint but I’m thinking it might reduce the mess and effort somewhat if I can use a stripper, but maybe this will attck the fibreglass though?


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PostPosted: August 16th, 2018, 10:28 am 
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Not sure, try a test piece. You won't need to sand it all off, unless you want a perfect hull. I'd just sand off the loose stuff, then give the rest of it a light sanding with 100 grit or somewhere around there, just to rough up the paint a bit so the new stuff will have something to adhere too.


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PostPosted: August 16th, 2018, 7:08 pm 
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Location: Toronto, Ontario
A few years ago, a friend and his son helped me fix-up a canoe with gunwales in much worse shape than yours.

Stainless steel screws, nuts and bolts cost about $60 from Fastenal.
Long strips of ash wood for gunwales and thwarts cost about $70 from Exotic Woods.
We were able to reuse the seats.
We broke some cheap plastic clamps of his, so another $20 to replace those.
Other supplies and tools probably cost another $50.

I think it took us a full day to get all the old stuff off, and all the new stuff on the canoe, and then another day to finish. Not the greatest finished product but respectable, and we learned some lessons and had some fun. I still paddle that canoe, and it would be hard for me to sell it now, or even make any changes, because of the time and effort invested by everyone.

I'd recommend paddling your canoe for a little while first, to see if you like the way it paddles. Do an overnight trip or two, to make sure it's not too heavy on the portages. Invest $25 in a small Dubuque or Jorgensen wooden handscrew clamp and some duct tape, in case one of the gunwales breaks.

Knowing what I know now, and being not too far from the 1/2 century mark, I'd save my ducats and invest in the lightest canoe I could find. A ducat invested in canoe, is a ducat saved in physio and chiro.

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