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 Post subject: paddleboard camping
PostPosted: September 10th, 2018, 7:01 am 
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Joined: April 16th, 2003, 1:50 pm
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Location: Toronto
Saw a group on paddleboards during my trip to Spider lake on the weekend. Anyone else seen this? Generally I've heard far more about paddleboards than ever seen them, so I've assumed they're mostly sitting at cottages and likely unused at that, but this is more like it. Admittedly Spider lake is not exactly remote backcountry, but they were two portages in.


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 Post subject: Re: paddleboard camping
PostPosted: September 10th, 2018, 10:18 am 
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Joined: June 23rd, 2006, 4:25 pm
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Location: Milton
There is a huge number now doing river trips and some very hard rapids and falls.
I have also seen pics and stories of them having dry bags strapped to the top for overnighters.
So I think there are here to stay and only have a bigger presence.
Jeff

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Choosing to save a river is more often an act of passion than of careful calculation. You make the choice because the river has touched your life in an intimate and irreversible way, because you are unwilling to accept its loss. — (David Bolling, Ho


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 Post subject: Re: paddleboard camping
PostPosted: September 10th, 2018, 1:22 pm 
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Joined: September 3rd, 2014, 4:35 pm
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Compared to jet ski's I love being around them. I'm curious to try the canoe with no sides some time. We did a bamboo raft float in Thailand once, I'd guess it's much the same but narrower and no staff to do the work for me :)


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 Post subject: Re: paddleboard camping
PostPosted: September 10th, 2018, 4:22 pm 
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Joined: July 9th, 2003, 11:48 am
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Location: Back to Winnipeg
A friend of mine in BC did the famous Bowron Lakes trip on a SUP. However, as about a 1-week trip, she did need a canoe along to carry gear.

I've heard of ww kayaks and canoes doing trips where they needed rafts to carry their stuff, but for SUPs, canoes have become their "rafts".

I haven't seen it yet, and I don't think I'm likely to try it myself (the camping-by-SUP part, I already have a board), but I expect we'll see more of it.

In the paddlesports business, everyone is focussing on SUPs and even kayak fishing - it can be hard to get their attention for plain ol' canoeing!

P.

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Learning to paddle is like learning a language:
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 Post subject: Re: paddleboard camping
PostPosted: September 10th, 2018, 5:20 pm 
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Joined: May 25th, 2017, 3:02 pm
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Location: Guelph, Ontario
Yes, I can see paddle boarding staying but I would predict that after a period of time it will greatly diminish in popularity. Paddle boards are cool now and everyone wants to try one but I look to windsurfing/sailboarding in the 80s as an example. It was big. Everyone had to try it. There were a bunch of companies jumping into sailboard manufacturing. There are only a few manufacturers left around now. Sailboarding came close to being dropped from the 2016 Rio Olympics and being replaced with kite-surfing.

I suspect we have not yet seen the zenith of paddle boarding. It may become an Olympic sport. I suspect we'll see more going camping with them or running white water but it not something that you can relax while doing. I see lots of solo kayaks replacing canoes for day paddling but I see a fraction of the number of them camping with them. Canoe's and Cargo room still win the day for most wanting to camp.


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 Post subject: Re: paddleboard camping
PostPosted: September 11th, 2018, 7:15 am 
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Location: Toronto
Yeah, boardsailing's demise was pretty much total... it has a high minimum barrier to entry with the water-start, and kite-surfing is remarkably a similar sport that is just cooler still. The thing about paddle-boarding that's occurred to me is how it fits into the picture with respect to flat-water paddling on larger bodies of water with significant waves. In a situation where a kayak could dump and require an elaborate self- or assisted rescue, I would assume it's comparatively easier to get back on the board and restart.


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 Post subject: Re: paddleboard camping
PostPosted: September 11th, 2018, 7:33 am 
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Joined: February 24th, 2005, 1:15 pm
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For the past couple of races, the Yukon 1000 mile race has allowed SUPs to compete.
https://www.yukon1000.org

They are required to travel as paired teams and begin the race with all camping equipment, safety gear, and food on board to be totally self sufficient and last as long as two weeks without resupply. No pit crews, no resupply or you will be disqualified. Take a look at the required equipment list in the rules. Don't be surprised to be windbound for a couple of days, as they have been, while traditional canoes and kayaks paddle right on past.
https://www.yukon1000.org/race-rules/

SUPs have also been paddling successfully in the Adirondack Classic 90 Mile Race for several years. Not finishing fast, but finishing nonetheless.


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 Post subject: Re: paddleboard camping
PostPosted: September 11th, 2018, 11:12 am 
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Joined: June 28th, 2001, 7:00 pm
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Location: Freeland, Maryland USA
jedi jeffi wrote:
There is a huge number now doing river trips and some very hard rapids and falls.
I have also seen pics and stories of them having dry bags strapped to the top for overnighters.
So I think there are here to stay and only have a bigger presence.


I have seen tripping paddleboarders twice on the Green River (Utah). The shortest trip they could do between accessible put ins and take outs is 50 river miles.

On the first occasion the paddleboarders had accompanying canoes carrying much of the gear, with minimal stuff on the boards. The second time however they were completely self-supported.

The Green from access points Ruby Ranch to Mineral Bottom to the confluence with the Colorado is largely flatwater, but it can be/often is very (upriver) windy. The second group of paddleboarders had camped at Trin Alcove and I watched them launch on a windy day when I was glad to be staying put for a layover.

I fully expected them to either swim or struggle, but those guys were obviously accomplished and paddled out of the sheltered canyon and down the windy Green without a hitch.

A paddleboard would not be my cuppa tea for a multi-day camper, my 16 foot solo was stuffed to the gills for a hundred mile trip both times. I kinda wondered if their trip was for some adventure paddleboarding article, or just for sheer bragging rights.

I think paddleboards are here to stay; easier to store, carry and transport than a canoe or kayak, and day trip paddling outfitters must love them for the simplicity. I’m not sure the multi-day tripping aspect will gain many long term adherents once the blush of “firsts” runs off.

I would do the Green again in a canoe, kayak, sit-on-top or inflatable before I was reduced to using a paddleboard.


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 Post subject: Re: paddleboard camping
PostPosted: September 13th, 2018, 9:13 pm 
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Joined: April 6th, 2007, 8:42 pm
Posts: 386
I took the plunge__literally__ this spring and bought an inflatable SUP for a trip abroad involving plane travel. They are a huge growth market now, and as with everything: windsurfers, in-line roller skates, canoes, kayaks, folding boats, they will of course one day experience a decline. No matter. They have potential for some interesting applications. Lots of people in Colorado are tripping in inflatables on rivers, mainly day tripping, though. I met a canoe-supported paddle-boarder in Killarney several years ago. Someone has already done a self-supported circumnavigation of Lake Superior. People are using them as fishing craft. Some outrigger canoe racers (Hawaiian and Tahitian) are using them as cross-trainers as the stroke technique is complementary. A local C1 masters racer here in Ontario told me many of his paddling buddies have moved over to SUP racing. I've really enjoyed mine. I haven't gone on an overnighter with it yet, but haven't ruled that out either.


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