It is currently October 16th, 2018, 10:09 pm

All times are UTC - 5 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 9 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: First night in a hammock
PostPosted: May 7th, 2018, 8:34 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: August 8th, 2017, 9:14 am
Posts: 639
So I tried a hammock for the first time this weekend - overall I'd say neither positive nor negative. I'll have to try it a few more times to figure out if it is really for me. I wrote it up on my blog if anyone is interested.

http://www.prospector16.com/2018/05/fir ... mmock.html


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: May 7th, 2018, 8:47 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: June 28th, 2008, 2:06 pm
Posts: 257
Location: GTA
Good write-up!

I feel the same way as you about limited space in the hammock for storage. But with one of the large Hex-Tarps, there is a very large area that stays pretty dry even in the worst of rain.

Also, if you have a large dry bag/canoe pack like a SealLine Pro Pack, you can keep things in there fairly securely and just under the hammock of you hang it high enough.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: May 7th, 2018, 10:31 pm 
Offline

Joined: October 9th, 2009, 9:52 am
Posts: 731
Location: Toronto Beach(es)
Yes, the bottom side of your sleeping bag will compress and loose insulating power, which is why hard core hangers use underquilts (which strap on under the hammock where they don't get squashed) and top quilts. However, a blanket or even a beach towel clothespegged underneath will keep some wind off and add some insulating power. I know you don't want to invest a lot on something you're not sure of, but with a 2QZQ bug screen modification, you could zip your sleeping bag OVER your hammock like a pea pod in the non-buggy seasons and not squash the insulation.

My Warbonnet RidgeRunner bridge hammock (also a kijiji find) is double layered so I can slide a 26" T-rest between the layers and use a sleeping bag on top without it skootching away like it likely would in your Hennessy.

I am a fan of the taut-line hitch and use it on my tarps, but would be leary of using it for my hammock suspension ... I've seen them slide. My suspension is different than yours, but with the stock Hennessy suspension, I'd be more inclined to use a trucker's hitch with a quick release finish, or the knot Hennessy recommends.

My RR sleeps flatter than your Hennessy, so space underneath for storage is greater, as long as it is set high enough. My 10 x 12 Chinook tarp provides plenty of coverage. I like to keep one side in porch mode in good weather, which combats the claustrophobia.

I did find some sway in my first hammock which was a Hennessy Safari, but little to none in my RidgeRunner.

Lots of great info to be found here:
https://www.hammockforums.net/forum/content.php


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: May 8th, 2018, 7:26 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: February 24th, 2005, 1:15 pm
Posts: 237
I left the ground for the hammock about 12-15 years ago, when the first generation of the Hennessy hammocks came out, along with a couple scouting guide instructor team friends who have converted as well.

I went to hammock camping because I rarely camp at prepared campsites, and when canoeing remote Adirondack lakes and ponds, nearby ground that is flat and clear enough for even a tiny solo tent is a rarity. I often hang my hammock over low growth brush or heavy blowdown, over wet or rocky or hummocky uneven ground, or on steep slopes. Can't put a tent in any of those places.

I will admit there is quite a trick to sleeping bag entry, especially in a bottom entry model. It can be quite comical to witness someone try to get settled for their first night. Before the discovery of under quilts, it was necessary to use an insulating pad, even on relatively warm Adirondack summer nights. The trick was finding a way to hold the pad in place, as the hammock's main purpose seemed bent on squirting the pad out from under the sleeping bag as the occupant struggled to get in. That can be countered in a couple of ways. I started by sewing an old thin sheet together into an overbag to put both sleeping bag and pad into, thus holding the pad firmly in place. Another method is to get a sleeping bag with a built in pad holding sleeve on the bottom, such as the Big Agnes style of bag. I use one of several different weight BA bags I have to this day. I put fresh clothing inside the hammock with me, which provides a bit of side insulation on my shoulders where i may need extra warmth.

With the side stabilizer shock cords properly staked or tied to trees or brush, I don't ever notice any excessive swaying side to side. No one I know has any problem with claustrophobia in a hammock. Then again many of my friends are at home cave explorers.

I bring the standard tarp for predicted good weather, or a large hex tarp for expected heavy rain. Anything I put on the ground beneath me stays dry. I get several degrees of warmth when needed from either overhead tarp depending on how high I stake the wings. As a canoer, my gear bag is waterproof and i simply hang it on a nearby tree, having no problems with rain on it. I carry a small tarp or large garbage bag to put under my hammock for boot storage or other items I might need outside of the pack, and to stand on while getting in or out of the hammock.

How you hang the hammock determines how you get positioned along its length. Silnylon is very slippery stuff, so if you tie the head end too high, gravity will slide you away from the widest mid section where you want to be. I find that If I tie the foot end slightly higher than the head, then I am positioned exactly where I want to be.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: August 9th, 2018, 11:31 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: March 9th, 2004, 2:12 pm
Posts: 852
Location: Waterdown
I too am a hammock convert as I found sleeping on the ground terrible for my back, and I kept going through leaky pads... I've pretty much gone to full time hanging in a hammock now as I just find it SO much more comfortable than a tent. I've learned a ton over the past 10 years or so and finally upgraded to a proper 11 foot hammock along with a set of underquilts. I noticed a huge difference in comfort moving from my 9.5 foot hammock to the 11 footer. It's way easier to lay on the diagonal and get that nice flat lay. I'm a side sleeper and have no issues in my hammock. The other thing that took me a while to nail down was the right thickness pillow. A normal pillow was just too thick but I finally found the perfect one (Thermarest pillow) and I sleep like a baby now!


Attachments:
Stephen Elms Photography-1.jpg
Stephen Elms Photography-1.jpg [ 612.86 KiB | Viewed 516 times ]

_________________
-------------------------------------------------------

My Website: http://www.elmsphotography.ca
My Blog: http://www.elmsphotography.blogspot.com
Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: August 9th, 2018, 2:56 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: August 8th, 2017, 9:14 am
Posts: 639
What kind of hammock do you have Steve?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: August 9th, 2018, 3:01 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: March 9th, 2004, 2:12 pm
Posts: 852
Location: Waterdown
I ended up with a Dream Hammock Raven (wide). It is a HUGE step up from the ENO. Comes with a zip-in bug net and is double layered. It does start to get a bit costly when you start adding up the hammock, underquilts (I have 2 now), top quilts, and winter tarps. So far I'm over $1000 in and still have to drop another $400 for my winter tarp.

_________________
-------------------------------------------------------

My Website: http://www.elmsphotography.ca
My Blog: http://www.elmsphotography.blogspot.com


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: August 9th, 2018, 6:27 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: August 11th, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 5406
Location: Sunny Wasaga Beach
Brad Thomas wrote:
Good write-up!

I feel the same way as you about limited space in the hammock for storage. But with one of the large Hex-Tarps, there is a very large area that stays pretty dry even in the worst of rain.

Also, if you have a large dry bag/canoe pack like a SealLine Pro Pack, you can keep things in there fairly securely and just under the hammock of you hang it high enough.



I guess you could take a small 1 man tent along just for storage
i

_________________

Old canoeists never die---they just smell that way.



Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: August 11th, 2018, 3:37 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: September 21st, 2006, 8:41 pm
Posts: 34
Location: Brampton, Ontario
Good write up Prospector.
I have been a 'Hanger" for around 10 years now, I too was not sure the first few times and thought I had just wasted $300 on a Hammock. I woke up almost hating it and could not stand trying to get into my sleeping bag at night. But I decided to give it an honest try and spent some time researching; now I would never go back to a tent, the only time I tent now is if there is only two people and the other doesn't hang and we want to keep weight minimized. Although I now find myself offering up my ultralight one man to the other person so I can bring my hammock. First thing I learned was to ditch the sleeping bag, or unzip it and throw it over like a top built and get and insulator for the bottom. The difference this made alone, made me start to like it. Then I mastered the optimum diagonal set up allowing me to lay nice and flat and sleep in any position (I can sometimes roll around to different positions every hour or so) Now I was starting to love this sleep system. Being able to wake up and just stand up into my footwear and have my body feel totally recovered from a day of hiking was awesome, not to mention the 2 minutes set up or take down was great!(Snake skins are a must, they also allow you to set up and take down in the pouring rain without getting your Hammock wet) I now have a top quilt and bottom quilt and use my MEC blow up pillow. As for storage I upgraded my purchase to have an extra large tarp and have plenty of room and keeps all my gear underneath dry. I also carry a small 3x4 tarp (the cheap blue dollar store one) to throw on the ground so I have something to stand on without footwear to get in and out and change on without standing on the ground. I also purchased a 'Monsoon' tarp shelter to use instead of my normal one if I am going in winter storms or now it will be awful weather, it has doors and can close right up around the Hammock like a tent right to the ground or I can leave it closed on one side and opened up high like a canopy for nice weather on the other. The very first time I slept in my Hennessy it was one of the worst rain storms I have ever witnessed still to this day, it was a hurricane force rain for most of the night and although I had not mastered the art of Hanging yet I was impressed by the fact that the product remained bone dry all night as I lay there watching the lightening show listening for the crack of a widow-maker. I am now experimenting with using the tarp without hanging. I find with a ground sheet it makes the ultimate Bivy sack with the tarp set up overhead if trees aren't big enough to support the hang.
The book "The Ultimate Hang" is a great resource and read for anyone serious about giving this a shot or improving your skills and knowledge,

I hope you continue to try it out, it really is fantastic once you get use to it and master the set up.

My Set Up:
- Hennessy Safari Deluxe Zip - their biggest one for ppl 7' and up to 350lb. i am 6'5 and 250 so i wanted extra room
- Down filled Top and Bottom Quilt by Jacks R' Better, Not cheap but exceptional product and workmanship
( I use the Sierra Sniveller Long top and Mount Washington4 for the bottom)

Options I added later:
- Sometimes use a Carabiner and two wrings super fast set up no figure 8 wrap or knots, easier for tensioning.
- Old Man Winter Tarp from Wilderness Logics (another great company with great products and workmanship) I have attached a couple pics below of this Monsoon style tarp.
- 2QZQ Bottom Quilt Protector, an absolute must if you hammock in bad weather, it will ensure your down stays nice and dry and great value, in fact it was so cheap I bought one for my friend as B-day gift. (not that I wouldn't anyhow but you get the point.lol
- For those not wanting to spend money on a bottom quilt , you can make your own. My friend borrowed mine so he could try out the larger set up and loaned his to another friend, he made a bottom quilt by buying a regular sleeping bag and then having a seamstress attach paracord at each end so he could tie it to the hammock support lines. Worked and looked great and cost him about $100 vs 250 - 500 for professionally made ones. 4 years later and still in use.

Also, my Old Man Winter tarp does not need poles as shown in the pic below, I upgraded with a pole mod, so I have a tent style pole that slides in a sleeve across the top to keep it opened up like the pic but without any hiking poles. well worth the extra 25$

I will attach a picture of two Hennessy set ups mine Safari (green) and my friends Explorer Delux (bark)


Attachments:
File comment: Old Man Winter
Old Man Winter2.png
Old Man Winter2.png [ 564.78 KiB | Viewed 355 times ]
File comment: Old Man Winter
Old Man Winter1.png
Old Man Winter1.png [ 615.54 KiB | Viewed 355 times ]
File comment: My Safari
Hammock1.jpg
Hammock1.jpg [ 119.03 KiB | Viewed 355 times ]
File comment: Friends Explorer
HammockB.jpg
HammockB.jpg [ 133.37 KiB | Viewed 355 times ]

_________________
Outbound2Explore

Wilderness is not a luxury but a necessity of the human spirit. ~ Edward Abbey
Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 9 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 5 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 14 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group