It is currently January 15th, 2019, 11:32 pm

All times are UTC - 5 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 115 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 4, 5, 6, 7, 8
Author Message
PostPosted: January 12th, 2019, 7:57 pm 
Offline

Joined: April 26th, 2012, 2:42 pm
Posts: 49
What year did you find the pack?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: January 12th, 2019, 11:05 pm 
Online

Joined: September 19th, 2003, 8:46 am
Posts: 661
What year? Not certain. I was on a solo so it must have been a year or so before Ferguson mine was changed into Ferguson Lodge. I informed the RCMP. Early 80s? May I ask why? I did keep an eye for people down to Yathkyed Lake. That's where I changed watersheds. Ferguson River then over to Maguse River etc. Just remembered - passed a short time with a group called The Edmonton Explorers. I believe he name of the individual in picture is Gleason.

Image

Image

Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: January 12th, 2019, 11:10 pm 
Online

Joined: September 19th, 2003, 8:46 am
Posts: 661
Here is a link to the individual (Keith Sharp) who owned Ferguson Lodge. I believe Juanita and I were there the first/second year it was opened.

http://www.explorenunavut.com/rankininl ... dation.php


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: January 13th, 2019, 12:43 am 
Offline

Joined: April 26th, 2012, 2:42 pm
Posts: 49
Know of a couple groups that had some difficulties, but they were later.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Yesterday, 11:04 am 
Offline

Joined: January 22nd, 2005, 12:16 pm
Posts: 3974
Location: Toronto
Thanks to David for what some may consider to be an excessively gentle response regarding my fox’s paw about Grinnell’s credibility.
I should have referred to the following, rather than to the broken-glass item.

Lanouette’s journal for the day of Moffatt’s death is provided in
http://www.myccr.com/phpbbforum/viewtop ... 81&t=46738
The leading passage regarding the dump that caused Moffatt’s death:
After a satisfying lunch, chowder and 3 ‘tacks apiece, we shoved off again around 2:30. The weather was still dismal, even though the wind had dropped almost completely. The river flowed on swiftly and within a few minutes we heard and saw another rapids on the horizon (Note: At this time, Art figured we had shot the last 2 rapids into Marjorie so this surprised us—actually, what we earlier thought were rapids were only riffles. What lay ahead was the real beginning of the first rapids). From the top, these rapids looked easy—a few small waves, rocks…nothing serious—we didn’t even haul over to look it over, as we usually did. The river was straight and we could see both the top and foot of the rapids quite clearly. What we didn’t realize, is that we couldn’t see the middle, even though we thought we could. We barreled happily along. We bounced over a couple of fair-sized waves and took in a couple of splashes but I didn’t mind, as I had made an apron of my poncho and remained dry enough. I was looking a few feet in front of the canoe for submerged rocks. Suddenly, Art shouted “Paddle”—
Opinion. The remainder of the journal is not relevant to the discussion. But the reader may wish to confirm this statement.

The Sports Illustrated condensation of the above.
After a fine lunch of fish chowder, we shoved off again at around 2:30. The weather was still dismal, although the wind had dropped. In a few minutes we heard and saw rapids on the horizon. This surprised us. Art had figured we had already shot the last two rapids before Marjorie Lake. Actually, what we had gone down were only riffles, and what lay ahead was the real beginning of the first rapids. At the top, the rapids looked as though they would be easy going, a few small waves, rocks—nothing serious. We didn’t even haul to shore to have a look, as we usually did. The river was straight and we could see both the top and foot of the rough water quite clearly, or we thought we could. We barreled happily along. We bounced over a couple of fair-sized waves and took in a couple of splashes, but I didn’t mind, as I had made an apron of my poncho and remained dry enough. I was looking a few feet in front of the canoe for submerged rocks when Art suddenly shouted “Paddle.” [Sports Illustrated, 16 March 1959, p 85].
Opinion. The condensation is a faithful one.

Grinnell’s version of the Sports Illustrated condensation.
After a fine lunch of fish chowder, we shoved off again at around 2:30. The weather was still dismal, although the wind had dropped. In a few minutes we heard and saw rapids on the horizon. …
At the top, the rapids looked as though they would be easy going, a few small waves, rocks—nothing serious. We didn’t even haul to shore to have a look, as we usually did. The river was straight and we could see both the top and foot of the rough water quite clearly, or we thought we could. We barreled happily along. We bounced over a couple of fair-sized waves and took in a couple of splashes, but I didn’t mind, as I had made an apron of my poncho and remained dry enough. I was looking a few feet in front of the canoe for submerged rocks when Art suddenly shouted “Paddle.”
[Grinnell book (1996), top of p 202]

Comparison reveals that Grinnell redacted the three-sentence passage
In a few minutes we heard and saw rapids on the horizon. This surprised us. Art had figured we had already shot the last two rapids before Marjorie Lake. Actually, what we had gone down were only riffles, and what lay ahead was the real beginning of the first rapids.
and replaced it by an ellipsis.
And so some might conclude that passage to be something special.

Interpretation of the redacted passage.
Lanouette and Moffatt were surprised because J B Tyrrell had advised Moffatt by various means (book, correspondence, map and journal) that the rapids where he died need not be scouted.
Indeed, JBT’s rapids advice had proved so reliable over the previous 11 weeks of the trip that the Moffatt party experienced but one swamp, not one pin and not one dump. As well, the only two dumps of the entire trip occurred in those rapids.
And so I ask the reader to consider Grinnell’s motivation for redacting those three sentences.

Aside regarding the remainder of the trip.
Several persons have commented negatively regarding the survivors’ decision to portage to Aberdeen Lake on the Thelon, rather than continue down the Dubawnt. And so I mention that one canoe had been left over Moffatt’s body. Given than the canoes carried also gear and food, three persons in one canoe would have been less than ideal in the significant rapids (for example JBT’s London rapids) known to lie above the junction.

Thanks again to David. Allan

_________________

A literal mind is a little mind. If it's not worth doing to excess, it's not worth doing at all. Good enough isn't.  None are so blind as those who choose not to see. (AJ)



Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Yesterday, 1:55 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: August 27th, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 2444
Location: Geraldton, Ontario Can
Very interesting discussion, kind of reminds me of Luther, Zwingli, Bucer and Melanchthon in the consubstantiation vs transubstantiation debates.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Yesterday, 9:16 pm 
Online

Joined: September 19th, 2003, 8:46 am
Posts: 661
Alan: "I should have referred to the following, rather than to the broken-glass item."

Came after:
"Monday, August 1. Camp #23. Middle of Boyd Lake.
"We stopped on a sandy little island, part of an esker which is being washed away, for lunch. We discovered, much to our annoyance, that 3 of the 12 jars of peanut butter in our canoe were broken and moldy. We now have about 10 jars left, as we were able to salvage some of the peanut butter that had not been affected by either mold or broken glass."

Which means??

To me this: Puts new complexion on Grinnell's "....... two jars of peanut butter had fallen out of a wanigan and smashed into myriad pieces on the bedrock of the river bank......No sooner had we come to this decision (to abandon them), than everyone said, "Well, if no one else wants them, I'll take them." We all laughed and gobbled down the peanut butter as fast as we could get our fingers into the jars, our teeth crunching on the larger chunks of glass, the salty taste of blood mingling with the nourishing taste of peanuts as the thinner slivers punctured our tongues and cheeks....."

and calls into question Alan Jacobs: " I express here and elsewhere my conclusion that nothing written by Grinnell is to be believed. Alan's opprobrium followed by my post on Grinnell's glass impregnated peanut butter chow down.

If Lanouette found reason to salvage 3 jars of peanut butter without remonstrance then surely Grinnell's 2 jar salvation is reasonable.

In both cases, reckless - on the level of dismissing one lying eyes/ears for 50 year old text. Lanouette journal: "The river flowed on swiftly and within a few minutes we heard and saw another rapids on the horizon (Note: At this time, Art figured we had shot the last 2 rapids into Marjorie so this surprised us—actually, what we earlier thought were rapids were only riffles. What lay ahead was the real beginning of the first rapids). From the top, these rapids looked easy—a few small waves, rocks…nothing serious—we didn’t even haul over to look it over, as we usually did."


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Yesterday, 10:17 pm 
Offline

Joined: January 11th, 2005, 4:58 pm
Posts: 1818
Location: Manitoba
There must be a tale to tell re that lost pack.

Unfortunately Keith Sharp died a couple of years ago. He and the lodge—I’m sure there are many fine stories there.

Loved canoeing the Ferguson River. The lodge was a ghost town when I passed by.

I’ve been enjoying the lengthy discourse...

_________________
Brian
http://www.JohnstonPursuits.ca

 


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Today, 9:53 am 
Offline

Joined: January 22nd, 2005, 12:16 pm
Posts: 3974
Location: Toronto
Is an accusation of lying appropriate for this venue?

_________________

A literal mind is a little mind. If it's not worth doing to excess, it's not worth doing at all. Good enough isn't.  None are so blind as those who choose not to see. (AJ)



Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Today, 5:22 pm 
Online

Joined: September 19th, 2003, 8:46 am
Posts: 661
Alan Jacobs: "Is an accusation of lying appropriate for this venue?"

If this Sartre quote "Man is condemned to be free" is true, then the door is wide open to accuse without restriction. And to be subject to contrapuntal engagement in The Eternal Golden Braid in the warp/weave that dresses reality. It's fugal to resist.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 115 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 4, 5, 6, 7, 8

All times are UTC - 5 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group