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PostPosted: January 20th, 2003, 5:54 pm 
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Joined: October 11th, 2001, 7:00 pm
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Location: Sudbury, Ontario Canada
I have an old wooden pair of snowshoes but the meshing is getting old and is ready to break. Does Anyone have any idea on what type of material I could use to replave it? Where can I get it? etc..

Any advice is appreciated........
thanks,

Derek


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PostPosted: January 20th, 2003, 6:32 pm 
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On 2003-01-20 17:54, lukey wrote:
I have an old wooden pair of snowshoes but the meshing is getting old and is ready to break. Does Anyone have any idea on what type of material I could use to replave it? ,

Derek


Yes, monofilament. Weed whacker type of mono might be OK


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PostPosted: January 20th, 2003, 10:44 pm 
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http://www.jackmountainbushcraft.com
Seems you might need the appropriate rawhide.


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PostPosted: January 20th, 2003, 10:57 pm 
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Maybe, I should clarify. I would like to completely redo the snowshoes not just repair.

If it were something like the weed whacker mono I think it'd be hard to bend it and manouver around. Too bulky?

Good idea, though, it might work.


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PostPosted: January 20th, 2003, 11:02 pm 
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Location: Big Flats, New York USA
There are several materials that are actually better replacements than rawhide. Neoprene has become very popular, although I haven't seen that material. Gil Gilpatrick's book on making snowshoes recommends nylon cord, typically found in your local hardware store. I've seen snowshoes made from nylon and they are great. Once coated with spar varnish they look like rawhide at first glance. The material is much lighter, doesn't absorb water and lasts a long time. He also describes the weaving process in great detail.

I'm in the process of following his book to make my own snowshoes. Failed miserably in my first attempt at bending. I'm trying to use a steam box instead of the boiler he uses. There is no way I could get a boiler to work in these temperatures. Does anyone have a recomendation on the steaming process?

Tony


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PostPosted: January 20th, 2003, 11:26 pm 
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On 2003-01-20 22:44, Kim Gass wrote:

Seems you might need the appropriate rawhide.


Where would I be able go get some rawhide suitable for this?


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PostPosted: January 20th, 2003, 11:27 pm 
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On 2003-01-20 23:02, maubdib wrote:

Gil Gilpatrick's book on making snowshoes recommends nylon cord, typically found in your local hardware store. I've seen snowshoes made from nylon and they are great

Tony



Do you know the name of his book? and where did you get it?


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PostPosted: January 21st, 2003, 10:35 am 
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Location: Geraldton, Ontario Can
Tony...

Haven't steamed wood for snowshoes, but i have done it for canoes.....only way I have success with hardwoods is to slice it up into 1/4 inch pieces and laminate them together afterward.....would probably work with snow shoes too...I'm assuming you are bending the wood around some kind of form or jig and clamping it?


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PostPosted: January 21st, 2003, 11:11 am 
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The book I am using is "Building Snowshoes" by Gil Gilpatrick. I think this book is out of print, being replaced by "Building Snowshoes AND Snowshoe Furniture", but it can still be had if you do an on-line search. I found mine through Amazon's affilitated dealers program (I think).

I think most of Gil's books are self published, and can be pruchased here. Gil is a Maine guide and has written one the most recommended books on building strip canoes.

I am following the instructions in the book that have been successfully used by a friend of mine, which include building a bending form. I'm going with a mild 1-1/12" to 2" upturn at the toe. The only difference is that I am trying to steam versus boil. My friend's boiler is a 10'piece of galvanized pipe which he lays on a two burner camp stove. I don't have a workshop and trying to get a boiler like this hot in subfreezing conditions is impossible.

I am using a 10' piece of 3" PVC as the steam box in my kitchen (I have a very tolerant wife). Boiling takes 2-3 hours, I steamed for 1.5 hours but ended up splitting the wood. The wood seemed to be flexible enough when first out of the steamer but cooled too much by the time I placed the sheet metal strips and started bending. I'm thinking for my next attempt of soaking the wood in water first, then steaming for two hours. Hopefully the increased moisture content will allow a greater working time.

Tony


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PostPosted: January 21st, 2003, 2:26 pm 
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When I'm bending the ash for outside stems, I steam it for about 1.5 hours as well. I find if you have two people so you can work quickly, it helps a lot. Also, just as i am bending around the critical angle, I pour the boiling water right on that spot, seems to help. I'm using the same kind of contraption as you are, PVC pipe, but i don't have a wife to contend with, don't know if that makes things better or worse.


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PostPosted: January 21st, 2003, 4:29 pm 
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Location: Revelstoke, British Columbia canada
Soak your wood to be bent in water for a day or two.Before steaming clamp or tape a piece of metal strapping of the same width of your stock to the outside of the wood ,this will help stop any grain from running out on you.Do not over steam the 1/4 inch rule is a good one. For every 1/4 inch of wood steam for 15 minutes Stagger your pieces for timimg when you put them in the steam box-1st piece in 1st out and so on.Give them a quick flex test,with a little experience you will be able to quickly tell when they are ready to go.Any pieces that do not bend but may because they have cooled leave them for 24 hours before re-steaming. You have a little time to work with the wood before it cools too much do not be in a panicky rush take your time And finally the old timers always say to bend towards the tree- meaning that the wood will bend easier if the grain is forced in a natural manner.

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: dboles on 2003-01-21 16:32 ]</font>


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PostPosted: January 21st, 2003, 7:39 pm 
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[quote]
On 2003-01-20 22:57, lukey wrote:
Maybe, I should clarify. I would like to completely redo the snowshoes not just repair.

If it were something like the weed whacker mono I think it'd be hard to bend it and manouver around. Too bulky?

Lukey, That was me who made the orig suggestion. I've seen wooden shoes re-strung commercially by somebody in PQ using monofilament. It probably wasn't weed whacker. The owner of the shoes had used them a few years since re-stringing and was quite pleased
Heavy duty mono is used by commercial fishermen for trawl lines and such. You can probably buy some o-line from a website that supplies fishermen.
wotrock


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PostPosted: January 21st, 2003, 7:40 pm 
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[quote]
On 2003-01-20 22:57, lukey wrote:
Maybe, I should clarify. I would like to completely redo the snowshoes not just repair.

If it were something like the weed whacker mono I think it'd be hard to bend it and manouver around. Too bulky?

Lukey, That was me who made the orig suggestion. I've seen wooden shoes re-strung commercially by somebody in PQ using monofilament. It probably wasn't weed whacker. The owner of the shoes had used them a few years since re-stringing and was quite pleased
Heavy duty mono is used by commercial fishermen for trawl lines and such. You can probably buy some o-line from a website that supplies fishermen.
wotrock


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PostPosted: January 21st, 2003, 8:53 pm 
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Location: Sudbury, Ontario Canada
Quote:
On 2003-01-21 19:40, wotrock wrote:
Quote:
Lukey, That was me who made the orig suggestion. I've seen wooden shoes re-strung commercially by somebody in PQ using monofilament. It probably wasn't weed whacker. The owner of the shoes had used them a few years since re-stringing and was quite pleased
Heavy duty mono is used by commercial fishermen for trawl lines and such. You can probably buy some o-line from a website that supplies fishermen.
wotrock




That's really neat, thanks a lot.

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: lukey on 2003-01-21 20:53 ]</font>


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PostPosted: January 21st, 2003, 9:07 pm 
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Location: Big Flats, New York USA
Quote:
On 2003-01-21 16:29, dboles wrote:
Soak your wood to be bent in water for a day or two.Before steaming clamp or tape a piece of metal strapping of the same width of your stock to the outside of the wood ,this will help stop any grain from running out on you.


I'm using vice grips to apply the metal strapping, that is what is took me so long to get to the form. I like the idea of attaching the metal before putting into the steamer, but I don't have room for clamps unless there is a small type that I am not aware of. How do you tape the metal? What type of tape will withstand steaming? Would it be possible to tack the metal in place?

Quote:
Do not over steam the 1/4 inch rule is a good one. For every 1/4 inch of wood steam for 15 minutes Stagger your pieces for timimg when you put them in the steam box-1st piece in 1st out and so on.

So for 3/4" stock that works out to 45 minutes? What happens if you go too long? How can you tell?

Quote:
Give them a quick flex test,with a little experience you will be able to quickly tell when they are ready to go.

I'm positive this is an art that takes experience, and some broken wood. Thanks everyone for all of your advice in helping me up the learning curve. I'll be taking another shot at it this weekend.

Tony

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: maubdib on 2003-01-21 21:15 ]</font>


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