It is currently October 20th, 2020, 4:33 am

All times are UTC - 5 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 14 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: October 6th, 2016, 6:04 pm 
Offline

Joined: September 8th, 2009, 8:29 am
Posts: 318
Location: Burlington, Ontario
This excellent trip started on Thursday Sept 8, in the year of our Lord 2016. Our access point was Opeongo Lake in Algonquin Provincial Park. This was a trip with no portages due to an Achilles tendon injury I sustained just after my last winter trip. This was also my one and only canoe trip for the year. I had to cancel the spring trip due to the injury. We were on the water just after 1015. Due to the recent rain, the fire hazard rating went from high to low. The wind wasn’t too bad until we reached Windy Point. At this point we were canoeing into a headwind. We arrived at our site at the East Narrows by noon. After lunch, we headed out in the canoe for a wood run. Shortly after heading out in the canoe, we startled a moose in a small bay just behind our site. We heard the moose charging away from us before we saw it. It ran a good distance in the shallow water before bolting into the bush. It happened so quickly that I could not take a picture. Below are some pictures of the site and of the view from the site:
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
After getting back to the site it stopped raining and we set up the tent and the tarp. I finished processing the wood before dinner. We had steak, rehydrated beans and two ice cold beers each for dinner. We had some hot drinks sitting around the fire. I topped the evening off with a scotch and water while my dad enjoyed cradling a rye straight up. My reading material for this trip was a Catholic Bible and George Orwell’s classic 1984.
On day two we were up at 0630 and on the water before 0830. Our plan for this trip was to explore the East Arm of Opeongo and Annie Bay. We originally wanted to check out Pine Island and camp at this site if it was decent. Below is a picture of the view of the west side of the lake:
Image
We arrived at the island well before lunch but we did not particularly care for the sites. We then backtracked and checked out the site at Twin Islands. We did not really like that site either. From the Twin islands we noticed that there were some beach sites along the shoreline. We found a really nice site on the mainland. It was flat and there were a lot of beautiful Red Pine trees. It strongly reminded my dad of Finland and he wished to stay here for the next four nights. I happily agreed. We had lunch upon arrival and afterwards set up the tent and tarp. We then had hot drinks and did a wood run. Below are some pictures of the site and the view from the site:
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
My dad went for a walk along the shoreline after we got the camp set up. I stayed behind and processed the firewood. My dad came across the bones of a moose. When he came back to the site, I went with him to check them out. Here are some pictures of the bones:
Image
Image
Image

After processing the wood and checking out the moose bones, we went for a swim and washed up. We had a rehydrated dinner of spaghetti and meat sauce. After dinner, we did our normal routine around the fire. I also meditated on the Sorrowful Mysteries of the Rosary. Later that evening, a couple in a motor boat camped at the site next to our site. Below are some pictures of the site and of the sunset:
Image
Image
Image
Image
On day three we were up at 0630. After breakfast, we canoed to Annie Bay. My dad did some trolling while I paddled. Below is a picture of Annie Bay and of a log my dad caught. We were really wishing it had been a fish that he caught:
Image
Image
We did another wood run while in Annie Bay. Afterward, we headed out of Annie Bay following the shoreline while my dad was trolling. We ate lunch at site along the shoreline and arrived back to the site at about 1300. It started to rain as we got back to the site. Upon arrival, we got the fire going and I processed some more wood. I did some reading until dinner. Below is a picture of my dad sitting around the fire and a view of the lake:
Image
Image
We had a rehydrated meal I had prepared for dinner. It included rice, and a meat sauce with fried, onion, mushrooms, celery and cream of mushroom soup. The wind really picked up after dinner and we let the front of the tarp down to offer protection. Below are some pictures of the sunset:
Image
Image
Image
After dinner, we did our normal routine around the fire. I enjoyed reading while having hot drinks around the fire. We had our evening meal. My dad topped the evening off with some rye and I had a scotch and water.
On day four, we slept in until 0700. The wind was blowing all night and it was a cold morning. We were wearing toques until later in the afternoon when it warmed up a little. We had been planning to portage to Wright Lake to do some fishing, but due to the wind, we stayed around the site. After breakfast we did a wood run. Due to the chill and wind, we got a fire going at about noon. The couple that camped beside us the night before came by for a visit. The man was from Poland and his fiancé was from Russia. He was doing his Phd in environmental science. He and I talked about politics and camping while my dad and his fiancé told stories about their respective homelands. My dad told about how at the end of WW2, a Soviet patrol was camped about two miles from their home in Finland and how he and his family were evacuated to a nearby village until the patrol left the area. Thankfully none of the nearby houses were damaged. I had wanted to get a picture of the couple but I forgot. They headed out later that day. Below is a picture of my dad sitting under the tarp and a few pictures of the sun set:
Image
Image
Image
After the couple returned to their site, I finished processing firewood. By this time, the wind had died down and I went for a swim and I washed up. I meditated on the Glorious Mysteries of the rosary after lunch and the Joyful Mysteries of the rosary after dinner. We had rehydrated spaghetti and meat sauce for dinner. We did our normal evening routine around the fire that evening.
On day five we were up at 0630. Below is a picture of the sunrise:
Image
After breakfast, we canoed to the portage that would take us to Wright Lake. We took a few pictures of the foundation of an old building and rock cairn:
Image
Image
Once we got to Wright Lake, I paddled while my dad did some trolling. Below are some pictures of the two bass my dad caught and a view of the lake:
Image
Image
Image
Image
Once we got back to Opeongo, the wind had really picked up. Below is a picture of the lake once we got back to the bay that we were camping in:
Image
After getting back to the site, we had lunch and hot drinks. We then did another wood run. After processing the wood, I meditated on the Sorrowful Mysteries of the rosary and did some reading until dinner. We had fish and rice for dinner. Below is a picture of fish I ate:
Image
After dinner, we did our normal evening routine around the fire.
On day six, we were up at 0600 and on the water by 0800. We ended up camping at the most northern site just south of Squaw Bay. We arrived at the site before noon. After lunch we had hot drinks, set up the tent and then set up the tarp. Afterwards we did a wood run. After processing the wood, we went for a swim in the lake and washed up. For dinner, we had the rehydrated cream of mushroom meat dish with rice. After dinner, I meditated on the Glorious Mysteries of the Rosary and we did our normal evening routine around the fire. Below are some pictures of the site and of the view from the site:
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
On day seven, we were up at 0630. We arrived back to the access point before 10:00. All in all, we were blessed with a great trip. One of the benefits to having no portages on this trip was that my dad could handle staying six nights in the backcountry as opposed to five nights.
About one week after getting back from this trip, I did car camping at Agawa Bay in Lake Superior. I haven’t camped here for about seven years. I have never been able to post pictures on a report since it isn’t a canoe trip. I thought I would sneak some pictures from that trip into this report. I don’t think that most people will mind; especially jedi jeffi and Harlan if they check out the report. Here are two pictures from the first night:
Image
Image
Here are some pictures taken from day five. The wind had really picked up at noon and this brought about some nice wave action. This batch of pictures was taken along the lake heading west along the shoreline until I reached the river:
Image
Image

Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
The wind picked up as the day progressed. Here are some pictures taken in front of my site after eating dinner:
Image
Image
Image
I hope you enjoyed the report.

_________________

"Tradition means giving votes to the most obscure of all classes, our ancestors. It is the democracy of the dead. Tradition refuses to submit to that arrogant oligarchy who merely happen to be walking around." - G.K. Chesterton, Orthodoxy, 1908



Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: October 6th, 2016, 6:39 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: May 5th, 2015, 2:14 pm
Posts: 69
Location: London, ON
Great post, thanks for sharing. Looks like you had a great time on both trips. I think we have the same CCS tarp but mine is green - I like the orange, do you ever find it gets too... orange?

Thinking about going up to Surperior PP for the first time next year with a canoe. Out of the week of camping, how many days do you think were suitable for paddling?

Cheers
Marko


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: October 6th, 2016, 7:43 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: September 13th, 2014, 11:52 am
Posts: 386
Location: Toronto
Sorry about your injury, Cousin Pete, but SO HAPPY you were able to get out once with your dad!

And I liked those photos you snuck in there of Superior. Those are some incredible waves.

_________________
Instagram:
@tear_knee

Website:
thehappyadventure.com

Friends of Temagami:
friendsoftemagami.org


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: October 7th, 2016, 9:07 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: May 17th, 2003, 9:06 am
Posts: 471
Location: Hamilton, Ontario
Heh Pete, great report as always. I wondered why you had not been out for awhile. Sorry to hear about your injury. Not a pleasant one. You mentioned that you had spaghetti and meat sauce. When you do have that meal is the sauce only dehydrated or do you do both. I was going to bring noodles uncooked and add the sauce once it was rehydrated. Just wondered how you approach that one. Thanks for sneaking in the LS images.

_________________

    Things turn out best for the people who make the best of the way things turn out. John Wooden.



Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: October 7th, 2016, 10:32 am 
Offline

Joined: December 11th, 2015, 9:32 am
Posts: 73
Great pictures and I am sure a wonderful and treasured time spent together. Thanks for sharing.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: October 7th, 2016, 1:48 pm 
Offline

Joined: February 25th, 2011, 7:15 am
Posts: 90
Super report and pictures! And awesome tarpology. I would be grateful if you would post a step by step guide for setting up a tarp like that. Very useful when trees are not handy on a campsite.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: October 7th, 2016, 6:54 pm 
Offline

Joined: September 8th, 2009, 8:29 am
Posts: 318
Location: Burlington, Ontario
Hello MarkoMrko: Thanks for the kind words. It is CCS tarp. My prior tarp was a blue CCS tarp 10' by 16' but it was too small. This one is 15' by 15'. I really like the orange. I think it allows more light in compared to the darker colors. You will love LSPP. I would be too scared to canoe on Superior. However, I think that the first four days would have been suitable for canoeing. I have some videos of Bill Mason tripping on Lake Superior. You should check them out.

Hello Mrs. tearknee: The injury is much better. It was great getting out with my dad for six nights. I still learn stuff from him each trip. I am glad that you enjoyed the pics from LSPP. Thanks for the kind words. I hope you and Andrew get out for another trip.

Hello skeeter: I am glad you enjoyed the report. Regarding the dehydrated meal. I only dehydrate the sauce(ground beef, onions, celery, peppers, spaghetti sauce). I do not dehydrate the noodles. When travelling solo, I add the noodles in with the sauce and as the sauce rehydrates, the noodles get cooked at the same time. When tripping with my dad, we rehydrate the sauce in the frying pan and boil the noodles in a pot.

Hello Hoolio316: Thanks for the kind words. I really enjoy getting out for the trips with my dad.

Hello swampwalker: I am glad you enjoyed the report. Maybe I can take pictures the next time we set up the tarp and explain what we are doing. The basic idea is pretty simple. We have a really long tarp line; even longer than the rope that we use to haul up the food bag. We run the rope through the outer loops on the top of the tarp and attach them to two trees for the ridge line. To prevent horizontal movement of the tarp, we center it around the fire and then tie a rope on the end loop on each side of the ridge line and attach it to the same two trees that the ridge line is attached to. We then lift the ridge line by using a spruce pole on either one side or both sides of the ridge line. We make long pegs from dead spruce trees to guy the line to the ground. We then guy out the corners either directly to the ground, to surrounding trees or we use dead Spruce poles to raise up a section if needed and then guy that line to the ground with a homemade peg. I hope this made sense. At LSPP I used four 2" by 2" by 8' pieces from Home Depot. I cut out grooves with my knife to properly attach the guy line so it does not slip down.

Take care,
Cousin Pete

_________________

"Tradition means giving votes to the most obscure of all classes, our ancestors. It is the democracy of the dead. Tradition refuses to submit to that arrogant oligarchy who merely happen to be walking around." - G.K. Chesterton, Orthodoxy, 1908



Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: November 17th, 2016, 7:31 am 
Offline

Joined: August 4th, 2015, 1:12 pm
Posts: 49
Location: Barrie, ON
Another great trip report Cousin Pete. I agree with Swampwalker about the tarpology. I will use those ideas when I get out camping next year. I now have to save up for a CCS tarp, as I have read and seen so many positive reviews about them.

Is that a Hilleberg tent you were using?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: November 17th, 2016, 9:21 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: June 23rd, 2006, 4:25 pm
Posts: 3088
Location: Milton
Great to read your report !
Always good to sneak in a few pics of the Agawa area! :thumbup:
Reading this as I am on a trip (no tenting) with my son in N.B.
Thanks for the post.
Hope your report inspires more to go out on these types of trips!
Jeff

_________________
Choosing to save a river is more often an act of passion than of careful calculation. You make the choice because the river has touched your life in an intimate and irreversible way, because you are unwilling to accept its loss. — (David Bolling, Ho


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: November 17th, 2016, 5:24 pm 
Offline

Joined: October 9th, 2009, 9:52 am
Posts: 873
Location: Toronto Beach(es)
I set my tarp in a similar style, but have bought a couple of the MSR folding poles to raise the ridgeline (and keep it positioned with Prussiks & 'biners).

Most of our trips these days are base camping after 3-4 portages. I have enough trouble finding suitable poles (that haven't been used for firewood (and especially late in the season)) at a single campsite, never mind hunting new ones down every day on a moving trip. What's your secret Cousin Pete?

PS. I find that surface roots, when available, make great tie out points for the side poles (even main poles when trees are scarce) rather than stakes. You might have to excavate just a little bit.

PPS. Great report as always...thanks for sharing!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: November 22nd, 2016, 4:31 pm 
Offline

Joined: September 8th, 2009, 8:29 am
Posts: 318
Location: Burlington, Ontario
Hello Crewser: I am glad you enjoyed the report. The CCS tarps are truly amazing. It is a Hilleberg Tent(Keron 4). Good eyes!

Hello jedi jeffi: Thanks for your kind words. I knew you would enjoy the pics from Agawa Bay. I hope you and your son have a great trip.

Hello open_side_up: I am glad you liked the report. Regarding the poles, we never have problems finding them. We can usually find suitable dead spruce poles within less than 0.5 km from the site. Usually though, when we head out in the canoe to do a wood run we pick up about 3-4 poles. You are absolutely right about using surface roots for tie out points. I forgot to mention using the roots. Thanks for bringing it up.

Take care,
Cousin Pete

_________________

"Tradition means giving votes to the most obscure of all classes, our ancestors. It is the democracy of the dead. Tradition refuses to submit to that arrogant oligarchy who merely happen to be walking around." - G.K. Chesterton, Orthodoxy, 1908



Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: November 22nd, 2016, 9:38 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: August 29th, 2006, 7:57 pm
Posts: 536
Location: Toronto
CP, I enjoyed your post - it is like an annual tradition - not only do you and your dad get to do 'em but then I get to sit back for a while and read about it! Nice to see your dad caught a couple of bass to fry up on the evening fire. Your Agawa Bay shots show a more turbulent scene - until I went back and read the text I was thinking, I hope that Pete and his dad didn't paddle through that!

_________________
http://albinger.me/canoe-tripping/


Last edited by true_north on November 23rd, 2016, 10:00 am, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: November 23rd, 2016, 9:57 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: February 12th, 2004, 9:28 am
Posts: 2272
Location: Waterloo, ON
A good read and some great photos as always. A true_north said, it's almost like an annual tradition. :-)

_________________
No, your other left!
Loon Island Outdoors
"Like" my Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/LoonIslandOutdoors


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: November 24th, 2016, 7:16 pm 
Offline

Joined: September 8th, 2009, 8:29 am
Posts: 318
Location: Burlington, Ontario
Hello true_north: I am glad you enjoyed the report. The fall trip has become an annual tradition. Eating fresh bass was really nice.

Hello Splake: Thanks for the kind words.

Take care,
Cousin Pete

_________________

"Tradition means giving votes to the most obscure of all classes, our ancestors. It is the democracy of the dead. Tradition refuses to submit to that arrogant oligarchy who merely happen to be walking around." - G.K. Chesterton, Orthodoxy, 1908



Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 14 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 5 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group