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 Post subject:
PostPosted: January 7th, 2003, 10:00 am 
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Joined: March 28th, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 129
Location: New Hampton, New Hampshire USA
Out of curiosity, has anyone done, know anyone who has done, or know of any write-ups about this river on the North Coast? It sounds like an epic river, huge, long, wild, 15 km portage, way out of my league but still fascinating. My infrequent web searches turn up sites that are all en francais.
Thanks!

Dave


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: January 8th, 2003, 8:02 pm 
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Joined: April 3rd, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 11
Location: St-Lazare, Quebec Canada
Hello!

Good start and info can be found on "General map of Quebec Canoe routes."

River Petit Mecatina reads very difficult route, made of rapids belonging to Class IV or lower. 5% belong to Class V or higher. Large body of water exposing travellers to very high winds. Many long portages over poorly groomed or even undetected trails make-up 30% of the route. Strong current. River runs north of Quebec to south and ends at the St-Laurent Golf (Cap Mackinnon).

Sounds like a good challenge and adventure...Note, I am just copying info from my map and relying info to you. I have never did this river and you may consider other Northern routes which the Province of Quebec offers.

Please see http://www.canoe-kayac.qc.ca

Cheers!

Solo2


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: January 8th, 2003, 9:00 pm 
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Joined: March 5th, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 1067
the web site is actually

http://www.canot-kayak.qc.ca/


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: January 8th, 2003, 10:06 pm 
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Joined: October 25th, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 170
Location: Ottawa, Ontario Canada
I don't have the magazine but would like to see this following article myself:

RAPID TRANSIT. Does impassable on a map mean impossible in person? On Labrador's wild Little Mecatina River, there's only one way to find out: in a canoe. Rod Beebe, En Route (inflight magazine for Air Canada), Vol. 19 No. 2, February 1991, p. 34-41.

Should I find it I'll let ya know.

How does someone in New Hampshire come up with "Skookum' as a handle?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: January 9th, 2003, 11:41 am 
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Joined: March 28th, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 129
Location: New Hampton, New Hampshire USA
I have that same Quebec map, that is why it is so intruiging (sp) - that super long strip of bright red with nothing else around (roads, sign of man, etc.)
I did find the same reference to that article and have fired off two e-mails to EnRoute about three days ago, If I do get the article I'll let you know what it is like or send on a copy or post it.
And no worries, I have no intentions of running this river (anytime soon)

There is a brook in New Hampshire's White Mountains called Skookumchuck Brook, and I found a translation that read "rapidly moving water", although I'm sure there are other translations. So I cut off the "chuck" and used skookum as my trail name while thru-hiking the Appalachian Trail in 1996.

Dave


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: February 12th, 2003, 2:38 pm 
There's also a set of rapids on the Magaguadavic River in New Brunswick, Canada called the Skookum Rips. I've flipped my boat in them. I think Skookum is an excellent canoeist handle.

Nanook of the Nashwaak


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: February 13th, 2003, 8:36 am 
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Joined: March 28th, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 129
Location: New Hampton, New Hampshire USA
Thanks - I'll have to check those rapids out, I need a good swim


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: February 16th, 2003, 7:37 pm 
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Joined: October 25th, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 170
Location: Ottawa, Ontario Canada
Ooops, late to respond here.

To the best of my knowledge Skookumchuck is a word from the Coast Salish people out around the Vancouver area. The Skookum means powerful and Chuck means water. There are a couple Skookumchuck Creeks out there and the famous Skookumchuck tidal rapids:
http://www.paddleguides.com/rivers/bc/skook/skook.pdf

'Skookum' is often used amongst the locals to describe something cool and powerful (don't let it go to your head), and you will often here 'Skookum move dude!' being exclaimed by local snowboarders.

Anyhow, Cool Name!


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 Post subject: A bit late...
PostPosted: July 8th, 2003, 10:29 am 
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Joined: May 1st, 2003, 3:58 pm
Posts: 12
Location: Montreal
Nothing quite like bringing up a year-old post on the Petite Mecatina but for interest sake, on a recent visit with my parents, I stumbled across an article about the river in an early-90s edition of "Canoe" magazine which my father refuses to throw out.

The author said that officials from various government agencies had responded to their queries using the word "unavigable" to describe the river; after reading the article, I'm inclined to believe it.

The river is dynamite, laced with class III-VIs throughout its run. But the real kicker is the canyon. From what I gather, it's 8-9K in length with 700-800 ft sheer walls, packed top to bottom with CIV-VIs.

About half of the article is based on the group's experiences portaging (perhaps bushwacking is a better word) experience which took them 3-4 days to complete if I remember correctly. In the end, they accomlished the task by ascending a small brook to the height of land above the canyon and then lined/rapelled the canoes over various cliffs and other debris back down to the river...it was tiring just reading about it.

To the best of their knowledge, they were the first group to complete the entire river from headwaters to the St Lawerence; other groups had either extracted before the canyon, or put in just below it.

Another article of interest I ran across was about a group of kayakers that ran the Magpie. Same area as the Mec and by their accounts, just as crazy!

Timbo


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: July 9th, 2003, 8:02 am 
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Joined: March 5th, 2003, 7:00 pm
Posts: 97
Location: Lac-Mégantic, Quebec,Canada
A descriptive map exists at "La federation quebecoise du canot-kayak"
http://www.canot-kayak.qc.ca/
It is not a guide-map but a "survey"...
For 18.00$ca (members only) you can obtain this "survey"...
I bought the pontax river survey this spring and I discover that it was of very big help... all campsites, rapids, .. were indicated... so I expect the same for the Petit Mecatina..

David


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: July 9th, 2003, 8:47 am 
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Joined: March 4th, 2003, 7:00 pm
Posts: 41
Location: N Central MA
Skookum,
I suspect that the article that Timbo is referring to is in the February/March 1985 issue of Canoe magazine titled "A Month Of Mecatina Madness" by Bill Coursey.

As Timbo mentions, about halfway through the trip, apparently there was a technical (climbing gear required) 9-mile trailless mountain portage around a class IV to VI canyon. Suffice it to say that they were not portaging ABS canoes around that canyon! Can't say as I blame them. :)


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 Post subject: Moisie River
PostPosted: July 9th, 2003, 10:00 am 
Hi I think the river you are thinking about is the Rivière Moisie... on the «Côte  Nord»

Here's some link, in english!
http://greatcanadianrivers.com/rivers/m ... -home.html
http://www.missinaibi.com/moisie.htm
http://www.sunrise-exp.com/quebec.html

Here an exerp from Sunrise Expedition:
The “Yosemite of the North” — Rising off the remote Labrador Plateau, and cutting an awesome glacial canyon through the Quebec North Shore, the mighty Moisie is a “world class” whitewater river trip. One of the most spectacularly beautiful rivers in Canada, the Moisie dwarfs the paddler with precipitous headlands and sheer cliffs towering up to 2000 feet. Successions of waterfalls cascade to fringes of the riverbed.

But the Moisie is not for everyone. As the river surges through these deep gorges, through the jumbles of gigantic glacial boulders, it creates rapids and falls of considerable magnitude. An expedition both technically demanding and physically arduous, it is suited for the serious canoeist seeking a challenge. However as with all our trips, top professional guides coach on technique throughout.

Access is by float plane out of Sept Illes, Quebec, where the trip meets. Egress is via the bi-weekly Quebec North Shore & Labrador Railway run from the Labrador interior to the coast.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: July 9th, 2003, 10:03 am 
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Joined: March 5th, 2003, 7:00 pm
Posts: 97
Location: Lac-Mégantic, Quebec,Canada
Guest,
Unfortunatly, the Petit mecatina really exist...
Regarding the Nahanni of the east.. . you're right... ti's the MOISIE!
The Petit Mecatina starts ont the Quebec-Labrador Plateau near the beginning of the Romaine and Natashquanr rivers...
it's a +500km journey!!!
D


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: July 9th, 2003, 10:49 am 
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Joined: May 1st, 2003, 3:58 pm
Posts: 12
Location: Montreal
"I suspect that the article that Timbo is referring to is in the February/March 1985 issue of Canoe magazine titled "A Month Of Mecatina Madness" by Bill Coursey."

Although I thought it was in the early 90's, I'm pretty sure that was the title of the article. :oops: Thanks for the correction MarshalM.

As David pointed out, the Petite Mec and Moise are two very different rivers. The Moise, although very challenging, is well known, readily accessible by train and has considerable traffic. The Petite Mec empties into the St Lawrence at Harrington (access by boat) east of the Moise and is only accessible by flying in. It's the Moise on steriods.

For more info check the aerial reconissance posting in the Newfoundland and Labrador Canoe Routes portion of this site

Timbo


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 Post subject: Petite Mecatina
PostPosted: August 20th, 2003, 10:03 am 
A month ago this thread started about the Petite Mecatina, but unfortunately none of the respondants had canoed the river. I have just returned from the Petite Mecatina and have a word for anyone considering canoeing it: DON'T! This was the most difficult, demanding, physically exhausting trip I have ever done. It is a big volume river with dozens of class 4-5 rapids, which means we did a portage-fest.. When there is no way to get around at water level you are forced up into the forest, which is extremely dense with thousands of down trees, perhaps the result of a very heavy hemlock looper infestation. Portaging in the traditional sense is impossible. You are shoving the canoes through woods a few feet at a tiime. And that canyon is truely impassable -- the portage around that is a whole story in itself. Sometime in the future, when I heal up, I'll write a trip report. Tom McCloud


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