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 Post subject: Teslin R TR
PostPosted: August 6th, 2001, 1:40 pm 
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Joined: June 20th, 2001, 7:00 pm
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Location: Hanmer, Ontario Canada
This is scouter Joe's wife. I owe him a big apology. He spent all day writing up this report and asked me to check it. I did. I also hit some random button and guess what??? Right - it was all gone for the second time, so now I get to be the writer. Just my few observations before he starts. I lost 12 inches off my butt from all the MOSQUITOES!!!!! Other than that the trip was AWESOME!!!!!!! Now for Joe's report......
We just returned from our trip to the Yukon. It was fantastic. We didn't do the Big Salmon River as planned as everything was in flood and the outfitter suggested that we do the Teslin instead. Apparently the week before a person drowned and a few outfitters lost some equipment on that river. The log piles and sweepers are too much for most people. We started at Johnsons crossing . The Teslin was a good choice because the scenery was beautiful which was the reason why we had chosen the Big Salmon in the first place. The Teslin is a big river and starts out slowly with marshy banks covered with willow and tag alders backed by snow capped mountains. After 40 km. the banks get steeper with numerous cut banks and the current picks up considerably. It remains this way to Dawson City and requires only ruddering if you're so inclined, (not to paddle). This is a remote river and we didn't expect to see many people. We saw lots of other paddlers every day, most of which were from Europe. There weren't so many people that it seemed crowded but you did see someone at least once a day. We saw moose, caribou, black bear, grizzly bear, dall sheep, mountain goats, beaver, pregrine falcon, eagles, otters and large assortment of differents ducks. Did I mention the MOSQUITOES!!!!!!! There were lots of flowers everywhere and the colour was unbelieveable. There is lots of history on the river. Lots of trapper cabins, old mine sites, remnants of the gold rush, gold dredges, paddles wheelers, and native settlements. All abandoned. The river was fast and it was necesary to watch the map to make sure that you are on the right side of the river where you want to stop and camp. The current was so fast that front ferrying was almost impossible unless you started well ahead of where you want to stop. We really had to work to get across a couple of times. The campsites were numerous and good although they aren't marked like in Algonquin or Temagami. After Carmacks the campsites were less frequent and mostly on gravel bars that weren't underwater. The campsites that were on shore and in the bush had lots of MOSQUITOES!!!! We had originally planned about 40 km a day which we had hoped would not be too much. As it turned out we averaged about 60 km and never spent more than 8 hrs. between camps. 770 km with no portages. We really got spoiled. Mama got dry rot on her paddle.The scenary only got more beautiful as we went . Around every bend there seemed to be another magnificent vista . Would we recommend this trip to others . You bet .If you are interested in heading out to the Yukon or have any questions email me and I will try to answer your questions .


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PostPosted: August 6th, 2001, 10:50 pm 
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Joined: June 20th, 2001, 7:00 pm
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Location: Wahta Mohawk Territory
Thanks for the report! One quick question: what made you decide to go so late in the year?

Cal White
Wahta


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PostPosted: August 7th, 2001, 7:37 am 
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Why do you think it was so late in the season? The people we talked to suggest that late July and August would be the best time to go. The water levels would be more stable opening up more gravel bars for campsites and the BUGS are less of a problem. The high water levels were due to abnormally high amounts of rain in June and early July.


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PostPosted: August 7th, 2001, 8:33 pm 
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Location: Wahta Mohawk Territory
Just showing my inexperience, I guess. I thought you'd be right in the middle of bug season.

Cal White
Wahta


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: March 23rd, 2002, 7:31 am 
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Joined: March 21st, 2002, 7:00 pm
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Location: Ivybridge, British Columbia UK
I canoed the Yukon in 2001, last week of August and first 2 weeks of September.
The weather was fine, a bit chilly at nights but warm in the days. Only as we got down to Carmacks did we run into wet weather. But, best of all, we had no problems with bugs. So it seems that late August is not late, we are back on the Teslin next year same time of year.
We'll let you know how we get on


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: June 7th, 2002, 7:55 am 
Hi All
I just found this list so please excuse my fumbling around. We're headed for the Yukon in August and plan to take the Stewart from below the Dawson-Whitehorse road down to the Yukon and then to Dawson. Can anyone tell me anyting about what to expect on the Stewart?

Thanks very much!

Steve Baker (still trying to register)


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PostPosted: June 9th, 2002, 7:47 pm 
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Location: Hanmer, Ontario Canada
The Stewart is a big river and was used at one time to move ore to the Yukon River by barge so there shouldn't be to many obstructions . Where we crossed the river there seeemeed to be a fair amount of current . Should be a nice trip . scouter Joe


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PostPosted: June 10th, 2002, 5:36 am 
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Location: Hanmer, Ontario Canada
Steve ,There is a few pages on the Stewart River in the Rivers of the Yukon paddlers guide book . Sounds like its a 150 kms to the Yukon river and another 110 kms to Dawson City . There must be a good current as the guide says 4 to 5 days will take you to Dawson Scouter Joe


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: June 11th, 2002, 7:43 am 
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Location: New Lenox, Illinois USA
Thanks to everyone for the tips. Does anyone know where I could buy a copy of the "Rivers of the Yukon Guidebook"?

Steve


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PostPosted: June 11th, 2002, 10:23 pm 
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Location: Wahta Mohawk Territory
Steve:

Do a search at http://www.alibris.com/ under: Rivers of the Yukon: A Guidebook. It's by Ken Madsen. They have copies on sale for $7.65 US$. I hope this is the one you're referring to but, if not, try http://www.bookfinder.com. That's how I found the above.

Cal White
Wahta MT


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: June 12th, 2002, 8:19 am 
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Joined: June 6th, 2002, 7:00 pm
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Location: New Lenox, Illinois USA
Excellent! I found it on the first try. Thanks!


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