It is currently August 18th, 2019, 5:16 pm

All times are UTC - 5 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 17 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: August 23rd, 2007, 10:11 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: August 7th, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 1018
Location: Duluth, MN USA
I'm looking for this book, and having no luck through the usually sources (addall, abebooks, alibris).

Anyone have any advice? I've heard this it's very small - perhaps I could scan a borrowed copy and return (for trade, payment, or similar loan - my library is ok).

thanks, Andy


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: August 24th, 2007, 10:09 am 
Offline

Joined: January 26th, 2006, 12:49 pm
Posts: 358
Location: Ontario
If you are ever in Toronto, the Toronto Public Library has a copy. Maybe your library can borrow it from them?

Location Collection Call No. Status
TRL STACKS REF-STACKS Request-N-SPC 971.9402 D28 In Library

I am assuming TRL stands for Toronto Reference Library

Toronto Reference Library

789 Yonge St.
Toronto, ON
M4W 2G8
Phone: 416-395-5577


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: August 24th, 2007, 10:22 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: June 20th, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 7513
Location: Scarbados, Ontario Canada
You know your way around reading material, don't you, Redstart!

For those that are not aware of it: at the TRL, you can only read in the library and not take the book out.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: August 24th, 2007, 10:25 am 
Offline

Joined: January 26th, 2006, 12:49 pm
Posts: 358
Location: Ontario
One of the benefits of being a student - access to the WorldCat database! :lol: Yes I am a nerd.

It is interesting that there are only two libraries worldwide that have the book - Toronto Reference Library and the Library and Archives Canada in Ottawa. No wonder you are having a hard time finding it, paddlenorth!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: August 25th, 2007, 1:42 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: January 2nd, 2006, 8:57 pm
Posts: 231
Location: Fort McMurray Alberta
what's the book about

_________________
These waves didn't look that big when I scouted it!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: August 25th, 2007, 2:44 pm 
Offline

Joined: September 29th, 2005, 5:57 pm
Posts: 595
Paddlenorth -

I remembered that Clayton Klein had mentioned Dunnning's book in "Cold Summer Wind 2", so I checked for his source.

He said he couldn't find one on the internet, but got one at the "Eskimo Museum" in Churchill. This was a few years ago.

If you haven't checked there already, you might give them a call. Google gives their phone # as 1-204-675-2030.

Regards,

jmc


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: August 25th, 2007, 3:46 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: June 20th, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 3449
Location: Toronto, Ontario Canada
Quote:
He said he couldn't find one on the internet, but got one at the "Eskimo Museum" in Churchill. This was a few years ago.


Was there last summer, can't say if they had this particular title but they did have a nice selection of stuff including many titles which I'm sure are not easily available elsewhere.

_________________
"What else could I do? I had no trade so I became a peddler" - Lazarus Greenberg 1915


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: August 29th, 2007, 1:49 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: August 7th, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 1018
Location: Duluth, MN USA
THANKS! Just ordered a copy from the Eskimo Museum. The funny thing is that I was up there 3 weeks ago and didn't see the book.

The book is compiled interviews of multiple people who used to live in Northern Manitoba/S. Nunavut 50-80 years ago - mostly (all?) trappers.

The book is mentioned in Cold Summer Wind II, and by Bill Layman's Thlewiaza article.

-Andy


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: August 29th, 2007, 3:10 pm 
Offline

Joined: September 29th, 2005, 5:57 pm
Posts: 595
Glad that worked out, Andy.

Post a review when you've received it?

-jmc


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: August 29th, 2007, 3:25 pm 
Offline

Joined: March 3rd, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 809
Location: Toronto, Ontario Canada
You might be interested in a little book I have called "Dwellers in Artctic Night". Printed in 1928, it's the memoirs of Archibald Lang Fleming, Archdeacon of the Arctic for the Missionary Society of the Church of England. A fascainating read with great illustrations and Plates.

_________________
Hell is other goats.

Jean-Paul Satyr


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: September 3rd, 2007, 9:43 am 
Offline

Joined: February 8th, 2006, 5:17 pm
Posts: 211
Andy: Just saw this thread. Glad you found a copy. I'm sure you will appreciate it.

Here is some info on it.

Years ago Norther Books used to sell it but at the moment I only have my own copy left. I don't think many copies were printed. It is I'm guessing a do-it-yourself self publishing effort. It is spiral bound, 124 pages with a number of photos, the most interesting by Francis Harper taken in 1947. There is no publication date but I think it must have been around 1988. On the back cover it states that the author (Gerry Dunning) "presently resides in Air Ronge, Saskatchean".

From the Preface:

"When the Foxes Ran" is an oral history dealing with interviews from retired trappers and trappers' wives. Each story provides an account of their past when they lived in the Keewatin area.

The years that are concerned fall primarily within the 1920-1948 period. The stories have been told to me by six of the Churchill's old timers. They have relived with me their prime in a country rich with wildlife.

...."

The six interviews are with
Clifford Cochrane
Jenny Tootoo
Eddy Batstone
Frances Voisey
Frits Oftedal
Charlie Scweder


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: September 5th, 2007, 2:17 pm 
Offline

Joined: May 22nd, 2004, 6:14 pm
Posts: 58
Location: La Ronge and North
On the topic of great books like When The Foxes Ran

look for A Thousand Miles From a Post Office by Rev J Lofthouse
and Caribou Eskimos Of The Upper Kazan River, Keewatin by Francis Harper.

On the topic of books that should have never been been written you can look at No Mans River by Farley Mowat. I quite like most of Mowat's other books once you get past the obvious grandstanding but this one leaves me cold. I have no idea what his purpose was other that to crank out yet one more best seller. The innuendo relative to the Schweder family and Rita did not need to be written. Also there are many errors. Thlewiaza means Little Fish in Dene not Big Fish as he says. Mowat also has David Thompson going up the Cochrane River when in fact he was the first European to cross from Reindeer Lake to Wollaston Lake via the Swam Blondeau route. Cvetka Kocjancic who is writing a book about Eskimo Charlie Planinshek, and who we have corresponded with, told us that she had sent a copy of her draft to Mowat. He used some of her material in his book and made no mention that she had done all the research. Rather poor form I would say.

Interestingly Charles Schweder in the Dunning book makes it very clear he had little if any use for Mowat and quite liked Harper. Yet in No Mans River Mowat says exactly the opposite and makes out that he and Schweder were best of pals. Now that both Harper and Schweder are dead Mowat can, and does, say anything he likes. For corroboration of what Charles felt about Mowat go to the Legion in Churchill for a beer and buy one for Robert Schweder (Charlies' son) and if he'll talk to you and ask him what his dad told him about Mowat and Harper.

Anotelik, whose picture is in the Dunning book and the Harper book, only died last year in Arviat (he went by the name of Luke Anotelik). The first time we went to Arviat I saw the name Luke Schweder written on the side of a house and asked an Inuit friend, Joe Savikataaq, who this was. It was, of course, Anotelik. We met him and told him we had been to the Schweder homestead 3 times. We also told him that we knew his sister Rita's daughter Angie who lives in Saskatoon. He told us in Inuktitut that he remembered the place and that the Schweders saved their lives when they in essence adopted them. Angie went to Luke's funeral and I was very touched when she told us that she and her husband Doug took a picture of Lynda and I standing with Luke that we had given to them and put it in the grave with her uncle.

Also interesting is that Lofthouse travelled with J W Tyrell in 1900 when he explored the Thelon for the Surveyor General in Ottawa (see Thelon, A River Sanctuary by David Pelly.)

Its is really amazing how much there is to read about the barrens.

_________________
Canoe Gear for the Subarctic
http://www.townoflaronge.ca/features/bl ... icGear.php


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: September 5th, 2007, 4:59 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: August 7th, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 1018
Location: Duluth, MN USA
Regarding the Cochrane River,

We have David Thompson's NWC map in our living room. He maps the Cochrane. Tyrrell notes in Thompson's Narrative that he first surveyed the Cochrane river - but where did David Thompson get his info? The way he draws the Cochrane, it looks surveyed rather than native info? Perhaps Peter Fidler in 1807?

>>>No, Peter Fidler didn't survey the Cochrane either. A.S. Cochrane first mapped the river for the Survey in 1881. Thompson labels the river the Rein Deer River.

Here's the map:
http://www.archives.gov.on.ca/English/interloan/big/thompson_mapa.htm

......
If George Luste reads this, Michael Peake is another possility if you go with a Thomspon theme.
http://travel.canoe.ca/Travel/NorthernCrossing/
......
Bill, thanks for sharing that story. If anyone is interested, there's a $200 whale carving in the Northern Images store in Churchill by Fred Schweder, Jr. He lists his location as Ennadai Lake (199something).


Last edited by paddlenorth on September 6th, 2007, 9:06 am, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: September 5th, 2007, 5:59 pm 
Offline

Joined: September 29th, 2005, 5:57 pm
Posts: 595
This obituary of Francis Harper in "Arctic" -

http://pubs.aina.ucalgary.ca/arctic/Arctic53-1-72.pdf

gives an overview of his northern work, and a fairly impartial account of his dispute with Mowat.

It also has a good photo of Harper with Rita and Anoteelik, and the Schweders. Is this the photo reproduced in the Dunning book?

-jmc


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: September 5th, 2007, 6:10 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: August 7th, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 1018
Location: Duluth, MN USA
jmc wrote:
It also has a good photo of Harper with Rita and Anoteelik, and the Schweders. Is this the photo reproduced in the Dunning book?

-jmc

Definately not. Thanks! I was looking for a photo of the post, and there isn't one in his books (Harper has another book on the Caribou with several photos of the area.)

Here's a modern photo for comparison. That out-building in the background is also gone.
http://www.canoeing.com/g2/main.php?g2_view=core.DownloadItem&g2_itemId=392&g2_serialNumber=1
The cabin looks shorter than it is because they piled dirt/rock around the base.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 17 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC - 5 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group