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PostPosted: November 21st, 2001, 4:07 pm 
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Joined: November 17th, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 2
Location: Copenhagen, Denmark
I am looking for information on the above mentioned river, so if any of you have such information or know any who has paddled the river, part of the river, It would be much appreciated.


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PostPosted: December 30th, 2001, 12:14 pm 
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Joined: December 29th, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 4
Location: tippecanoe, Ohio usa
hi there, at one time i had some interest in possibly canoeing the hayes river. i was unable to find many references to it anywhere. i did however find an article written in the 70's by a botanist who kayaked the hayes, solo. he was primarily interested in the local flora, and did not describe the river in too much detail. i don't recall too much specifically, except the river seemed to be a typical tundra river ie; big, some runnable rapids, some unrunnable, very remote, hard to arrange logistics, expensive. this makes it very seldom visited, which in itself may make it an interesting destination. depends what you are looking for in a trip. i do remember that he lost his kayak in a rapid and was forced to sit for a few weeks, awaiting his rescue. when he did not show up in chantrey inlet, the pilot flew upstream until he was located. i have looked in my files but can't find the article and i don't recall which magazine carried it. i seem to think it was in the archives of the explorers club in new york city. i would suggest trying to get hold of them. i think they forwarded the story to me. good luck. sorry i can't help more.


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PostPosted: January 3rd, 2002, 11:35 am 
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Joined: June 20th, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 418
Location: Wellington ON
The Hayes River was featured as part of last seasons 'Great Canadian Rivers' series on the discovery channel. If I am not mistaken this TV programing should be available fro purchase from their web site.

http:/www.exn.ca/Stories/2001/01/04/51.cfm

Neverthless, I think the series is to be repeated this year. They should be able to supply you with dates and times if the particular segment on the Hayes is to be repeated.

Dann


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PostPosted: January 5th, 2002, 5:53 pm 
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Joined: December 29th, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 4
Location: tippecanoe, Ohio usa
i believe that the hayes river that was featured on great canadian rivers was the hayes river in manitoba. the original post was referring to the hayes river in nunavut.


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PostPosted: December 13th, 2002, 5:55 pm 
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Joined: December 12th, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 16
Location: Enfield, New Hampshire USA
The Hayes was paddled a few years ago by the "Geriatric Adventure Society" from New Hampshire. The leader was Will Lange (will.lange@valley.net). They had a cold and miserable trip, but I don't think the river itself was the main problem. I am sure Will would be happy to tell you about it.


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PostPosted: December 13th, 2002, 8:14 pm 
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Joined: June 25th, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 3197
Location: Kanata, Ontario Canada
The Hayes is covered in Hap Wilson's
Wilderness Rivers of Manitoba
available through the CRCA


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PostPosted: December 16th, 2002, 4:16 pm 
You can check the web site we did of the trip in 2000 from Norway House to York Factory

http://rkgroff.tripod.com/riverweb/Default.htm


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PostPosted: December 17th, 2002, 9:40 am 
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Joined: April 23rd, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 434
Location: Two Harbors, Minnesota USA
Yo, folks! The original poster was refering to the Hayes River of Nunavut, not the one in Manitoba!!


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PostPosted: December 20th, 2002, 11:21 am 
I paddled up the Hayes about 100 miles this summer and can say it's an awesome place. The water is pretty and relatively warm, there are interesting sand formations on the banks, and the whitewater is not so tough. Best of all, it's so far out there, and no one much goes there.


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 Post subject: hayes river, nunavut
PostPosted: May 7th, 2003, 10:48 am 
I did most of the hayes from a lake in the upper river (don't have the maps handy to point out which lake) to chantry inlet in 1998. Started mid July, as soon as we could depend upon the ice being out. Weather for first 4-6 days cool/cold rainy, typical. After that it was too warm.

River seemed to be running low, as far as we could judge, which made the trip a little slower as there are long stretches of rocky rapids, usually ending in a ledge or big water. Had to do a lot of "bump and run" and lining.

Terrain is interesting if you like the barren grounds, which I do. Transitioning to the high arctic from the lower tundra around the kazan, etc. One can see a difference from the upper to lower river. Few or no willows on upper river. Willows and more vegatation on lower river.

River silts up very heavily as you descend. Not as estethically pleasing as clear mountain stream, and bothersome to clean drinking water.

It bears repeating, this is a very remote river, and should be attempted only by paddlers with a lot of wilderness experience. Doesn't require the highest technical paddling, as there are no "must run" stretches, but requires excellent judgment.

Of course, expensive to get in and out.

For specific questions, email gtc5341@yahoo.com


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PostPosted: December 2nd, 2014, 11:43 pm 
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Joined: June 23rd, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 40
Location: Boston, Massachusetts USA
I'll be with a group on the Hayes River and a very unknown upstream tributary, the Amittaq-Ammut River, in July 2015. Details @

http://www.wanapiteicanoe.com/trips.asp?ID=19

If you've got info or tales, let me know please.

Best
James


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PostPosted: December 3rd, 2014, 2:27 pm 
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Joined: January 11th, 2005, 4:58 pm
Posts: 1847
Location: Manitoba
Hey James, Not many people have paddled the NU Hayes. If you have not read it already, look up Duke Watson's account as I think he paddled it. There was also an epic trip several years ago -- maybe dragging boats to the river then downstream or upstream and then dragging onward -- I can't recall. Will Lange also paddled it. I'm sure there are others, but not many.

What have you been up to since the Laughlin River? I spent another summer canoeing lakes, river and ocean back to Cambridge Bay on the southern part of the island after a summer canoeing rivers and ocean on the northern part of the island.

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Brian
http://www.JohnstonPursuits.ca

 


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PostPosted: December 3rd, 2014, 3:26 pm 
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Joined: June 23rd, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 40
Location: Boston, Massachusetts USA
Thanks, Brian. Yes, Duke Watson documented a trip on the Hayes which we'll be referencing for sure. There's 1-2 folks here who have knowledge of it too. The tributary we're planning to paddle seems completely unknown.

I paddled the Hess River in the Yukon Territory last summer. Wonderful, very remote trip in the mountains and obviously of special interest due to its proximity to the Peel River watershed. Your adventures on Victoria Island sound amazing. I really want to go back there.


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PostPosted: December 3rd, 2014, 7:09 pm 
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Joined: January 11th, 2005, 4:58 pm
Posts: 1847
Location: Manitoba
Years ago I looked at the Hayes and I recall there are a fews starting options and route to where the Hayes becomes more river than creek like. I'd guess a couple of those tributaries have been paddled, others not.

Lots of good news of late about the Peel, see
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/pee ... -1.2856884

By the way, I've got a book out recently that you and the folks at Wanapitei would be interested. I consider it a community project to protect and share the cairn notes from Tyrrell's Dubawnt River cairn. It's called, On Top of a Boulder: Notes from Tyrrell's Cairn
See
http://www.lssd.ca/~bjohnston/FOV1-0003 ... =S011378CE

_________________
Brian
http://www.JohnstonPursuits.ca

 


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PostPosted: December 3rd, 2014, 7:41 pm 
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Joined: June 23rd, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 40
Location: Boston, Massachusetts USA
Thanks, Brian! As you know, trips in the Baker Lake area are tough to do these days because of limited air lift capacity. There are no Twin Otters based there anymore and the lone Single Otter is on wheels, overtaxed, expensive x10, and won't carry hardshell canoes.

LOL: I attended J.B. Tyrrell Secondary School in Scarborough, ON and have long been a fan of the brothers' smarts, audacity, skills, etc. If your book's on Amazon, I'll grab a copy.

Also, have you shared a copy with Bruce Hodgins? He's the dad of Shawn Hodgins, the chief guide of all my recent YT and Nunavut trips and owner of Wanapitei Canoe, http://wanapiteicanoe.com. Bruce is a prolific author and expert on all things north and canoe-related. He'd find your book fascinating, I bet.


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