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PostPosted: November 24th, 2014, 7:45 pm 
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... includes a great video of a rising moon.

http://iso.500px.com/basic-astrophotography-tutorial/

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PostPosted: November 27th, 2014, 7:37 pm 
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I tried some astrophotography for the first time this summer (good black sky on the shore of Lake Superior). Most of the my images looked OK. I went to this link and learned some more tricks - then I read his last tip/technique- digital processing in Lightroom after the image was taken. I think I now know why his images look spectacular but don't look real.....

Thanks for posting the link.


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PostPosted: November 28th, 2014, 8:52 am 
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I also read this when it first came out and came to the same conclusions a long time ago.
They are neat, but it is something that you will never see in real life.
The Same with high def images. I like to shoot what I see and share so that if you go there you will have a chance of seeing the same things, if you are lucky enough to have the same atmospheric conditions.
Jeff

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PostPosted: November 28th, 2014, 9:07 am 
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JJ,

Quote:
They are neat, but it is something that you will never see in real life.


I agree, IMVVVHO they are more like special effects rather than documentary photography and photojournalism. Still, anything goes, if the photo is the thing that's valuable.

YW, JC...

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PostPosted: November 28th, 2014, 8:17 pm 
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Just a note about post production. Working with the image in the "digital darkroom" - in this case Adobe Lightroom, is not fundamentally different than working a print in a darkroom using a film negative. The difference is that digital sensors are capable of capturing a considerable dynamic range, and the post production software is more capable of utilizing the RAW file, or "digital negative" than could have been possible with film and photo paper.

Ansel Adams, the grandfather of landscape photography, once compared the photographic process to music by saying "...the negative is the score, and the print is the performance."

To those who think that post-production work on and image is somehow akin to cheating, the reality is that photography has always been a two part process. That modern cameras and proper technique allows the photographer to create images that reach beyond the view of the naked eye not only makes for some exciting, thought provoking images, it opens our minds skyward, a realm which in much of the world has been snuffed out by city lights and urban distraction.

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PostPosted: November 29th, 2014, 9:37 am 
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CG, IIRC the history of photography (no photographic memory here!), Ansel Adams had been making photos that were only so-so effective, until he used a red filter to darken the sky deeply in a photo of Half Dome in Yosemite... he called the new breakthrough that changed his style something along the lines of interpreted realism (fuzzy memory from the 70s).

Another famous photographer summed up his work with something like... "I take photos so I can see what something looks like when it's photographed"... again fuzzy memory can't remember who it was.

When I was a kid in ancient times, I couldn't wait to get to the drug store to see how my pictures turned out and I spent much more time looking at each valuable picture, much more than now.

<where's my Instamatic>

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PostPosted: November 29th, 2014, 10:07 am 
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Mike I don't think good post production work is cheating, sometimes it is the only way to show what the eye sees in the short window of good conditions we encounter out in the woods.
And I really like how those astro photos show how complex our heavens are.
And they are very good.
I am more in lines of pointing my finger at those that use the processes available and change what is actually is there or add things to a photo that don't really exist.
Some shots are done very artistically and are sold that way, no problem with that either because the images can be very good on the eyes.
But the ones posted and saying this is what they saw at location "X" and is so photo shopped are the ones I have problems with.
Jeff

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PostPosted: November 29th, 2014, 11:00 am 
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Jeffi,

I hear what you're saying about over-doing it with post production. This is why I personally don't create HDR images - they often wind up looking like a video game. I still use graduated filters (the old-fashioned way) and generally compose images in the field as though I'm shooting slide film, trying to get it as right-on as possible in the camera. When working on night shots in post I'm often working with contrast & deepening the blacks to give more punch to the image. RAW files are not meant to be a final product anyway, and come out of the camera looking a little dull.

For anyone who has a technical handle on the SLR, and some decent gear, composing night shots is a fun & creative way to spend an evening in the north, especially when solo tripping or with another photographer. In other company it tends to be viewed as tedious and anti-social. On those trips the camera stays home in favour of the guitar, and all is well. :-)

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