It is currently November 27th, 2021, 3:14 am

All times are UTC - 5 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 37 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: October 2nd, 2021, 9:09 pm 
Offline

Joined: February 18th, 2021, 9:21 am
Posts: 61
Our two main canoes are old canvas covered cedar canoes. When we got them from the gentleman who restored them, he told me the rule with canvas covered was that "nothing touches the hull but water or air" .

Accordingly, I always launch from the water, and when we camp, I dont drag them up on shore, but rather I leave them floating in the water, tied off with a mooring line.

I always assumed this was normal, but I happened to be talking today with a friend who does a lot of out tripping. She always pulls her canoe up on shore (though hers are kevlar), and she said that leaving them floating as I do was "absolutely wrong" .

What say you guys?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: October 2nd, 2021, 9:13 pm 
Offline

Joined: April 18th, 2012, 5:23 pm
Posts: 116
Location: Burlington,ON
I find a place protected from wind and store it upside-down, preferably on some small bushes so it doesn't move in case the wind is picking up.
I have a 18'6" canoe, at 42Lbs. Carbon/kevlar. I would never leave it in the water.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: October 2nd, 2021, 9:40 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: August 29th, 2006, 7:57 pm
Posts: 610
Location: Toronto
We usually turn our canoe into a campsite table in the vicinity of our cooking area. It is a clean space to put various food-related stuff, plates, and utensils. The butane cookstoves benefit too as the canoe sometimes acts as a windscreen. Meanwhile, it gives us a chance t to check for new scratches and gouges if it has been an especially rough day of rapids.

Image

On that occasional windy occasion, before we crawl into the tent for the night we have put it on its side and placed it between the wind and our tent for a bit of a windscreen.

I've never heard of - or seen in all our canoe trips - anyone leaving their canoe bobbing in the water overnight.

_________________
http://albinger.me/canoe-tripping/


Last edited by true_north on October 2nd, 2021, 9:46 pm, edited 2 times in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: October 2nd, 2021, 9:42 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: December 20th, 2003, 9:27 am
Posts: 1006
I pull mine up on shore in a place that is out of the way of our travels down to the water. I put it upside down and tie at least one end to a reasonably solid tree. I've seen a few canoes, that were not tied down, go flying into the lake or river. It seems to me that there is a considerable possibility of damage to the boat if it is left in the water overnight. Winds and storms seem quite likely.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: October 3rd, 2021, 12:18 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: April 14th, 2018, 7:19 pm
Posts: 164
this canoe is fine to be brought ashore and leaned against a tree, etc. gunwales making the contacts. tied up. no need to 'drag' it up the shore. if you can carry it on portages, you can carry it to camp. wood/canvas boats are fairly durable and not afraid of land but of man (careless treatment).

night storage, depending on lake/position/river etc, i'd be fine leaving it in water (fully floating, none on shore), but it would only be for convenience sake, not to 'protect' it from site. if rain or high winds are not unlikely, i'd bring it up every time. same goes for other materials, except maybe plastic.

but if extended remote trip, boat always comes up regardless, and gets wedged into bush leaned over or anchored to tree/rock leaned over. on group trips the boats automatically go up to serve as kitchen tables, shields for packs, etc, and just to keep things organised.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: October 3rd, 2021, 8:08 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: December 19th, 2006, 8:47 pm
Posts: 9194
The trouble with mooring lines is you need two one aft and one fore. Otherwise the boat will spin bow into the wind and perhaps bash itself against shore rocks. Wind shift during the night is not unknown,

I tie mine on shore to two objects. One tie point is risky as if the boat is light enough it can pinwheel.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: October 3rd, 2021, 8:40 am 
Offline

Joined: March 10th, 2014, 5:10 pm
Posts: 188
Our boat is our way home. To me leaving it in the water is a risk. We get out before we hit shore, life the boat out of the water and place it gently somewhere safe.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: October 3rd, 2021, 11:37 am 
Offline

Joined: August 28th, 2020, 12:08 pm
Posts: 33
Usually upside down on the shore. Occasionally a boat will be used to hold all of the food and moored out from shore. Never had a problem doing that.

Anywho, many years ago we had a canoe go awol in the middle of the night. A mid-November snowfall left a foot or so of the white stuff on the ground. Our plan was to paddle the Moon River off highway 69. Turned out to be frozen over so we ventured out to Twelve Mile Bay. Buddy at the marina did us a favour and broke up the ice with his motor boat. Nice! Found some crown land and set up camp. Middle of the night card game was disturbed by a racket outside the tent. All four of us thought the sound came from a different direction. Turned out to be melting snow releasing one of the upturned boats sliding into the water with an east wind pushing it towards Georgian Bay. Found it the next morning several miles away lodged into an L shaped dock. Yup, overturn and tie now.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: October 3rd, 2021, 2:10 pm 
Offline

Joined: June 28th, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 2057
Location: Freeland, Maryland USA
I am an oddity in open canoe storage in camp.

I have storage covers for most of our boats, snap-on Cooke Custom Sewing center covers that span the drainage baffled partial bow and stern covers. Even in torrential rain and nylon humidity sag if I store the canoe upright at a slant all of the accumulated rain runs off the side.

ImagePA060100 by Mike McCrea, on Flickr

I used in-camp storage covers first with the decked canoes, because I didn’t like hazarding the rudder, or coaming edges, when flipped over. And quickly found that I could leave all of the paddling gear safe and dry and sight unseen in the hull, ready to go the next morning instead of cramming stuff in the vestibule, and carrying that gear back and forth from boat to camp to boat.

ImageP1050476 by Mike McCrea, on Flickr

In sand and mud and driving rain I’d rather not have my open boat gunwales, of any material, resting on the ground, with hard driven rain splashing muck and mud splashing inside (see your bespattered tent fly after a deluge). But storage covers are most convenient for having all of the paddling gear already in the boat, especially if base camped and simply wanting to take an early morning paddle.

In coated nylon any of the covers are the size of a loaf of rye, well worth it to me.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: October 3rd, 2021, 5:33 pm 
Offline

Joined: January 11th, 2005, 4:58 pm
Posts: 2102
Location: Manitoba
One of the attractive aspects of canoeing is that there are often different ways of doing thing, and few are absolutely wrong.
I believe the most common method of overnight camp canoe storage would be on land upside down, tied to a tree.
The next most common way might be upright, tied to a tree. Either fully out of the water or mostly out of the water.
Left fully floating, moored would be very unusual.

_________________
Brian
http://www.JohnstonPursuits.ca

 


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: October 4th, 2021, 1:16 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: April 14th, 2018, 7:19 pm
Posts: 164
as littleredcanoe noted, you may need 2 lines to prevent boat end reaching shore rocks etc,
but 2 lines prevent boat spinning such that its stem faces wind.
for demo, lets assume the wind is blowing straight toward your site shore.

the canoe with 2 lines is oriented such that it's broadside to wind and waves.
(if instead it faced wind and waves, then 2 lines were not needed after all).
(shore rocks not capable of being hit, in that case)
so, since we do have 2 lines, it means the canoe is broadside to wind and waves.

we also know it's somewhat shallow; otherwise likely boat out farther (not needing 2 lines).
so, waves and wind hit boat broadside. splash enters boat. drip by drip. slap by slap.
(if raining, add rain to the splash pool).

issue is not just the hull rolling over via wind while those 2 lines yank against.
issue is also the rocking canoe taking on water via the up-splash (and/or rain).
gradually sinking lower, which makes it more of a 'wall' to the waves,
which increases the up-splash, increasing weight, increasing wall, increasing up-splash, etc.
the worse it gets, the faster it gets worse.

boat fills becomes a bit like a swooshing bathtub. and getting worse.
hull gets deeper, boat now moving like a cradle with in/out current, huge swaying force.
hull may be hitting rocks below, and if so, much deadlier than when paddling the shallows.
anchors could here dislodge, lines could snap, tie off points could blow.

doesn't have to be a thrashing storm. can be moderate waves and decent wind over a long period.
rain is the 'grease' that gets the whole thing going.

so bottom line is this:
if using 2 lines, things can go disaster (albeit unlikely).
if using 1 line, i think you're better off.
because A, minimal up-splash (no wall), B, minimal hull-rocking in wind. C, minimal up-splash due to being potentially deeper (rollers vs. chop).
so i'd suggest 1 line as i think it's correlated with a better set of circumstances.

but this is not the advice i give. it's what i'd say to someone who IS going to float their canoe overnight.
the advice i give is to bring that baby in to camp.
and i don't see another reason for doing so, ignoring even more unlikely things (eg, proven knots coming undone, hurricane like winds, seagull shit party, etc)

i'd like to say "Hey do what you like, whatever floats your boat !"
but i can't, as now i notice, that would be putting a restriction on what you do LOL
which defeats the saying.


Last edited by remogami on October 4th, 2021, 6:59 am, edited 2 times in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: October 4th, 2021, 5:58 am 
Offline

Joined: June 28th, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 2057
Location: Freeland, Maryland USA
remogami wrote:
as littleredcanoe noted, you may need 2 lines to prevent boat end reaching shore rocks etc,
but 2 lines prevent boat spinning such that its stem faces wind.


I use both bow and stern lines, pulling in opposite directions (aka springlines) to secure the canoe even when stored ashore. The painter lines are always there, no reason not to use them both.

Years ago on a coastal trip we had a half dozen canoes, ()()()()()()upside down with bow lines tied off for the night. One of the canoes, upside down in the middle of the pack, was a UL carbon boat.

It was very windy that night. Next morning we still had a half dozen canoes tied off via the bowlines, but the carbon boat had caught a gust, leapt up from upside down in the middle and was now at the end of the row, upright, perpendicular and straining at the leash.

Ever since then I use both the bow and stern painters, pulling in opposing directions as springlines. In some coastal areas there may be only a bayberry bush to use as a tie down.

ImageP2180691 by Mike McCrea, on Flickr

To provide the opposing force springline I bring a screw-in dog run stake.

ImageP2180692 by Mike McCrea, on Flickr

I bring that screw-in stake on any coastal or desert river trip where there may be a dearth of trees.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: October 4th, 2021, 8:22 am 
Offline

Joined: January 25th, 2004, 2:59 pm
Posts: 272
Location: Ottawa
+1 for tying the boat down at night, even if it's upside down on shore. I woke up one morning after a big wind overnight. Went down to the water to fill up the coffee pot at which point I observed my boat sitting upright on a perfectly calm lake about 100m from shore :)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: October 4th, 2021, 9:06 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: August 11th, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 5869
Location: Sunny Wasaga Beach
Upside down, usually not tied but set in between trees

_________________

Old canoeists never die---they just smell that way.



Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: October 4th, 2021, 11:43 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: September 21st, 2006, 8:41 pm
Posts: 227
Location: Southern Ontario
Like most have mentioned, I never run my boat up on shore, always a wet entry/exit. I then lift it out for storage on dry land. overturned, I rarely ever tie it down but do make sure it is wedged or blocked so it cant fly away on me. As True North stated, they make great tables and wind blockers if needed. I don't think I would ever be comfortable leaving my canoe fully in the water, I would not sleep a wink if this were the case. I have never seen this done before with canoes.

_________________
https://www.instagram.com/outbound2explore/

Wilderness is not a luxury but a necessity of the human spirit. ~ Edward Abbey


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 37 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3  Next

All times are UTC - 5 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group