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 Post subject: Using oars on a canoe?
PostPosted: November 13th, 2021, 2:07 pm 
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Location: Pickering, Ontario
Sounds crazy, but I'm sure it's been done. Thinking of modifying our old battleship, 16' Scott Tripper, fibreglass, 78 lbs, with oarlocks and oars. Our Swift Prospector is much easier to paddle as we get older, but the Scott is a bit cumbersome.

Anyone have any experience in this area?

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PostPosted: November 13th, 2021, 7:56 pm 
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It's fairly common to see folks doing this here. Most use a setup that gets the oar-locks well outside the gunnels. Options are commercially available, or home-made. West Coast (Pacific) Handliners are a direct development from rowed canoes, and when I was young, were so common as to be ubiquitous. Many beaches on Vancouver Island had rows upon rows of them pulled-up.


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PostPosted: November 15th, 2021, 7:04 am 
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Dave,

I had (still have, though I haven't used it for several years, a Sportspal that included built-in oarlocks and combination paddles/oars.

I tried using the oar configuration a few times but never liked it It was hard to do facing forward and hard to maintain direction facing sternward. Using a paddle with a J-stroke seemed much simpler, not to mention being able to use a second paddler when available.

The stock Sportspal "paddles" include extra hardware to engage the oarlocks which only add a bit to the weight when using one as a paddle. I soon bought a pair of proper canoe paddles and used them instead.

For a heavy canoe like you have, there might be some advantage to oars when soloing, otherwise I think paddles would generally be more efficient, especially in narrow waters.

- JF -


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PostPosted: November 15th, 2021, 2:08 pm 
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There used to be outrigger kits available for some 17-18 ft canoes.
IIRC Grumman had them and I think OldTown.

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PostPosted: November 15th, 2021, 2:35 pm 
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This is of interest, as I recall the canadian canoe museum has in its collection a canoe rowing system with oars that is front facing.

I quick Internet search found this article on it.

https://paddlingmag.com/stories/columns ... ow-system/

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PostPosted: November 15th, 2021, 4:42 pm 
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Brian and all,

That rowing system would be just the thing for delivering mail in the Kawarthas via the Trent Canal, but I'd hate to have to portage it.

Thanks for posting that -- I love gadgets.

-Jf-


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PostPosted: November 16th, 2021, 2:49 pm 
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Here’s a newer version, that’s available.

https://www.ghboats.com/options/accessories/forwardrow/

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PostPosted: November 16th, 2021, 7:24 pm 
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Paddle Power wrote:
Here’s a newer version, that’s available.

That is a very interesting and ingenious setup. Love the mechanics of it.


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PostPosted: November 21st, 2021, 12:52 pm 
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Paddle Power wrote:
This is of interest, as I recall the canadian canoe museum has in its collection a canoe rowing system with oars that is front facing.

I quick Internet search found this article on it.

https://paddlingmag.com/stories/columns ... ow-system/


Cool! Complicated as all hell, but cool! :lol:

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PostPosted: November 21st, 2021, 2:32 pm 
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Location: Freeland, Maryland USA
Articulated oars for narrower craft have been around for a while. The materials have improved, but the articulation mechanics remain much the same.

Some rowed hunting boats used articulated oars for the forward facing aspect. If you have ever hunted from a canoe or other small boat that advantage is obvious.

Not just hunting; I rowed a variety of craft in my youth, and never much cared for seeing where I’d been, and looking over my shoulder at where I was going.

EDIT: Dating back at least to 1863

https://www.frontrower.com/u-s-marshals.html


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