It is currently December 6th, 2019, 12:41 pm

All times are UTC - 5 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 12 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: October 21st, 2019, 11:56 am 
Offline

Joined: September 16th, 2019, 1:47 pm
Posts: 28
Out of curiousity... I often solo paddle Canadian style, heeled well over. What is it that defines a good hull for this? I'm thinking I could move a 18'6" hull along at a good pace if I have the advantage of the narrow waterline profile when heeled. I expect the longer waterline profiles would be better for outside-edge turns. Would a flared and concentrated mid-section give me back the responsive inside-edge turns? I'm thinking along the lines of a Wenononah Sundowner, Sawyer Charger, or Jensen WW2 type of craft.
Thank-you for any insight you can provide. :thumbup:
Daniel


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: October 21st, 2019, 12:19 pm 
Offline

Joined: January 11th, 2005, 4:58 pm
Posts: 1896
Location: Manitoba
I knew someone who did epic long distance canoe travel (Inuvik to Gulf of Mexico, etc.) solo paddling a Clipper Jensen WW2. Worked for him.

_________________
Brian
http://www.JohnstonPursuits.ca

 


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: October 21st, 2019, 2:18 pm 
Offline

Joined: September 16th, 2019, 1:47 pm
Posts: 28
Has he written about his experiences Brian? I'd love to give it a read, or speak with him.
Daniel


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: October 21st, 2019, 6:48 pm 
Offline

Joined: January 30th, 2018, 12:46 pm
Posts: 81
I think that in general you look for boats with nice gently rounded shoulders and also some nic gentle font o rear curvature (rocker). So Prospectors are ideal since they are gently round side to side and also front to rear. When leaned they become a "smaller boat" in terms of their footprint on the water...plus they still behave predictably when leaned a little more or less because the gently rounded shape never changes suddenly.

The Wenonah Argsoy and Rendezvous solos are a good contrast. They are efficient paddling straight ahead when vertical but they have sharp, square-edged center sections and they will both scare the bejeezus out of you when leaned.

The WWII looks terrible for Canadian style with zero rocker and sharp shoulders. Probably a fine choice for solo tripping with huge loads when paddled level but I'm willing to bet a dollar that it wasn't paddled leaned over.

When you are leaned over with the ends out of the water I'm not sure you'll get the speed benefits of a longer canoe. If you are near a Clipper dealer you might test one of their longer Prospectors.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: October 22nd, 2019, 12:18 pm 
Offline

Joined: January 11th, 2005, 4:58 pm
Posts: 1896
Location: Manitoba
No he haven’t.

_________________
Brian
http://www.JohnstonPursuits.ca

 


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: October 22nd, 2019, 12:23 pm 
Offline

Joined: January 11th, 2005, 4:58 pm
Posts: 1896
Location: Manitoba
“ The WWII looks terrible for Canadian style with zero rocker and sharp shoulders. Probably a fine choice for solo tripping with huge loads when paddled level but I'm willing to bet a dollar that it wasn't paddled leaned over.

When you are leaned over with the ends out of the water I'm not sure you'll get the speed benefits of a longer canoe. If you are near a Clipper dealer you might test one of their longer Prospectors.”

Good points here. Best to test the Clipper WWII/Wenonah Minnesota II and compare it to a more traditional style canoe when heeled over.

_________________
Brian
http://www.JohnstonPursuits.ca

 


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: October 24th, 2019, 12:22 pm 
Offline

Joined: March 9th, 2014, 11:10 pm
Posts: 19
agreeing with daypaddler here. you would want a boat that is fairly soft and rounded in the bilge to sides for the transition from upright to heeled. an 18+ long canoe would be massive to solo, even for a big guy and would be prone to wind something fierce. if you solo a lot, perhaps a dedicated solo boat is in order? sounds like you need to demo where possible.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: October 24th, 2019, 2:24 pm 
Offline

Joined: September 16th, 2019, 1:47 pm
Posts: 28
I'm sorry for muddying this thread up by mentioning commercial models. I was trying to use them as a (poor) example. I'm hoping to nail down a group of attributes that are complimentary, and will give me the theoretical hull that best serves me. If it doesn't exist, I have the ability to build it.

I've some fairly solid experience in long, very skinny kayaks in exposed coastal conditions. The seas here tend to be short-period, and choppy, over a larger swell, with confused current up to 7knots - OR large volume and period swell with long fetch wind-waves on top - when I'm paddling on the outside.

symmetrical
rounded-hull
length 18'6"
beam 30"
performance load of 500lbs.
rocker 3-4" starting close to center position


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: October 24th, 2019, 8:12 pm 
Offline

Joined: March 9th, 2014, 11:10 pm
Posts: 19
i'm doubtful such a highly specialized canoe with the given dimensions exists, and there's a lot of specialized canoes out there. Wenonah isn't afraid to explore the niches. if you build it, pictures would be awesome.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: October 25th, 2019, 10:38 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: December 19th, 2006, 8:47 pm
Posts: 8937
Location: Rattlesnake Pond ME
Wenonah would be the closest that would build to that length and width but 3-4 inches rocker sounds more like Esquif. ( but those are wider) The Mistral is their longest canoe but at 37 inches wide.
However in Canadian style why does the flat width matter?

I have Canadian style soloed a Wenonah Odyssey ( deepwater version of the MN II). The stems do come up out of the water even though it technically lacks rocker. It has quite a bit of side rocker and depth so Heeled way over the stems are loose. Begs the question of pack ejection and windage.. At 18.5 feet it is very sensitive to wind and you have to heel way over almost to the rail to unstick the stems. Seems a very tenuous way to canoe trip.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: October 26th, 2019, 12:21 am 
Offline

Joined: March 9th, 2014, 11:10 pm
Posts: 19
symmetrical
rounded-hull
length 18'6"
beam 30"
performance load of 500lbs.
rocker 3-4" starting close to center position

this boat does not currently exist.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: October 26th, 2019, 2:50 am 
Offline

Joined: September 16th, 2019, 1:47 pm
Posts: 28
I came across a youtube video of Sue Plankis very recently. In it, she finishes in a birch-bark canoe by Ferdy Goode. A beautiful, practical, and unusual craft.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 12 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 5 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group