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PostPosted: March 30th, 2005, 1:26 pm 
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Joined: July 9th, 2003, 11:48 am
Posts: 1693
Location: Back to Winnipeg
I have a wooden pole that is probably about 13' long? All I know is it's a tough fit to bend it around seats and thwarts and get it to the floor of my Prospector 16'.

I don't know anything about poling and have only tried it once, the pole came with the used canoe. As did a sailing rig, anybody want a sailing rig?

P.


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PostPosted: March 31st, 2005, 5:17 pm 
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Joined: May 11th, 2003, 2:57 am
Posts: 561
Location: Burlington On.
There's a great book on everything to do with poling by Garret Conover
called Beyond the Paddle.I got it out of my local library.Well worth a read.


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PostPosted: November 15th, 2021, 8:21 am 
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Joined: September 14th, 2021, 10:36 pm
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for those who have carbon fibre poles, what wall thickness tube did you use to make them?


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PostPosted: December 8th, 2021, 11:21 am 
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Joined: June 28th, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 2097
Location: Freeland, Maryland USA
We have a couple poles, wood closet rod poles and a take-apart aluminum “Texas Towers” pole, all DIY’ed using Fred Klingener’s easy instructions. One half of the aluminum pole has a paddle blade and tee grip that button clip in at either end, and can be used for stand up paddling.

Both of my sons are occasional polers, I am not, at least in the traditional sense. But I do use a shorter “push pole” while still seated, and we have several of those.

ImagePC261477 by Mike McCrea, on Flickr

Those push poles have different end stubs, one with a “Coots Foot” for marsh and swamp work. We have a spring loaded “Duck Bill” end as well; the rigid Coots Foot actually works better.

ImagePC261479 by Mike McCrea, on Flickr

The five and six foot poles are handy when briefly grounded out on a sandbar, cobble riffle or mud shallows, where a single lifting push will see me again floating free, and also serve a hiking staff and even a spare tarp pole in camp.

I wanted one for the Yellowstone Solo. The Cooke Custom Sewing paddle pockets and lash straps bow and stern on the spray covers of that little canoe are perfect for my usual paddle propulsion, double blade secured up front, single blade stored aft.

ImagePB270030 by Mike McCrea, on Flickr

But our usual tripping canoe push poles are too long.

ImagePB270032 by Mike McCrea, on Flickr

Even our shortest, a five footer, was too long. I needed a shortstuff push pole for a shortstuff 14’ canoe. A four footer fits perfectly; stained and urethaned, with a broad, grippy crutch tip stuck on the sanded down fitted bottom peg, and a Mohawk pear grip epoxied on the fitted top peg.

ImagePB280035 by Mike McCrea, on Flickr

I really like those plastic Mohawk pear grips for revamped single blades or push pole purposes, perfect OD match for that 1 ¼” hardwood dowel and many paddle shafts. The slender cherry single blade in the stern paddle pocket is a DIY with one of those pear grips.

ImagePB280037 by Mike McCrea, on Flickr

https://www.mohawkpaddles.com/product/p ... placement/

I had a shorter, skinnier 3 foot dowel in the shop, and while the pegging sander, urethane and epoxy were out, what the hell, might as well peg-end that one and make a winky three footer with an ugly old T-grip, which fortuitously had the perfect OD to match that 7/8” dowel.

ImagePB280033 by Mike McCrea, on Flickr

The cane sized three footer doesn’t fit between the paddle pocket and lash strips very securely, but the four footer fits perfectly, and I may need to make another at that size. I have not (yet) epoxied the crutch tips on the bottom pegs, one or the other or both may serve a different purpose. A constant paddler friend is recuperating from a motorcycle accident; broken leg, ligament damage and shoulder surgery.

He is hobbling around with a cane, a standard aluminum crook-topped Granny model, and facing some months of shoulder rehab. I’m not a physical therapist, but as someone who makes their living guiding paddle trips he may eventually benefit from making a gentle paddling motion before ever getting in a boat.

He could start with the three footer, 7/8” dowel, eight ounces with tee grip and crutch tip, and work his way up to the five footer, 1 1/8” dowel, just over 1lb, left for now uncut too tall to be Hopalong cane handy.

Easy enough to cut down to hobble-around size; I’ll bring them both and a saw next time I pay him a visit. I can always make another, and kinda want to. The pear grip is comfy on a paddle, but a tee-grip is handier on a short push pole. In boat or in camp; it can become a “pull” pole to hook a friend’s gunwale when muckling up, snatch something out of reach in the bow, grab a limb or branch, etc

I don’t have another crappy old tee grip, but I’ll find one somewhere.


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PostPosted: December 8th, 2021, 4:22 pm 
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Joined: October 11th, 2021, 4:19 pm
Posts: 61
CraigB wrote:
for those who have carbon fibre poles, what wall thickness tube did you use to make them?


Carbon-fibre is pricey stuff for use as a pole Craig. I imagine the light and snappy-feeling of it would be nice. I do wonder if excess floatation might make it harder to plant. Possibly foam-fill it for durability? My poles always seem to get bashed-up, twisted and broken. Leaving a forest-harvested pole behind, and making another (when needed) keeps the canoe clear. Sometimes cheap, easy and available is also most functional. 13' long and 1-5/8" diameter fits the hand nicely. As to how thick the wall should be - I've no direct experience except paddleshafts - I'd suspect 1/8” would be functional. Best pole I had was a gorgeous octagonal Sitka Spruce pole with perfect grain that a friend made me. A bit big and heavy at 1-7/8" but served me very well. Crappiest, and still functional pole was a whippy alder pole that gradually bent to a C-shape with use. Lower limbs off Western Red Cedar - though naturallly arced have worked well for me in a pinch. I'm eyeing a wild-cherry at my cabin for my next pole.

Sorry if I didn't answer the question as asked, thought maybe I could save you some expensive frustration?


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PostPosted: December 8th, 2021, 7:42 pm 
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Joined: June 28th, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 2097
Location: Freeland, Maryland USA
Lendal made a 2-piece carbon fiber pole in the 2000’s. A couple poling friends had them and seemed to like them. The 2-piece connect/disconnect was quite rigid, but required the use of a hex key.

There may still be information around on the carbon wall thickness that Lendal used.


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PostPosted: December 9th, 2021, 1:01 pm 
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Joined: June 28th, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 2097
Location: Freeland, Maryland USA
Palmer wrote:
what size (length) of pole do you use?

what, approx, is the girth at widest point?


To the OP’s initial questions, 12’ long seems a “standard” length, some friends use an 11’ pole.

Usually 1 ¼” diameter, sometimes 1” depending on the material; much wider than that can be heavy, or a handful of girth. Kinda like paddle shaft diameter, unless you have big mitts the diameter needs to be sized for grasping comfort.

If you are looking for a “first pole” the closet rod DIY is an easy place to start. All of the parts and piece are big-box hardware available. The selection of 12’ closet rods requires some selection and testing, some are light, some heavy, some have too much grain run out, and some, tested against others held and bent at a 45 on the Home Depot floor, are stiff and some floppy flexible. Pick a good one.

These detailed and documented instructions, above on Tommy C1’s post, are all you need to make a closet rod pole:

http://www.brockeng.com/AmusingRaven/pole.htm

I’ve poled some, both with closet rod and aluminum poles. Not really my thing, and on the whole I preferred wood.

Apologies for the forthcoming photo deluge. I was looking for a specific poling photo; didn’t find that one, but did find a few memorably photos and, can’t resist commentary. Some paddling friends enjoy performing poler tricks. Gunwale stands; I’m still unsure how they get both feet up there at once, it is like some gravity-defying skateboarder trick.

ImageIMG021 by Mike McCrea, on Flickr

Or sillier stuff, of even less practical use.

ImageEK_0021 by Mike McCrea, on Flickr

That is a Lendal carbon fiber pole on the three stacker. And two of those canoes being bizarrely abused are mine.

This is termed “An aggressive step-out”; I’m told that if your head isn’t wet it is still considered a “step out”. Easily blamed on Mobey the dog, who I will note is still inside the canoe, and dry. Mobey was a barking PITA at times, but he loved to play fetch in rapids, and learned to work upstream ferry angles, ruddering with his tail. Mobey may have read water better than his human.

ImageIMG004 by Mike McCrea, on Flickr

Some dogs are better balanced than others. Mollie and Ruthie for example; those two had more canoe time than most paddlers.

ImageIMG018 by Mike McCrea, on Flickr

Poling on frigid snowy days to me seems fraught with chilly peril, but then I rarely stand up in current, even in the best of weather. Low water winter saw a lot of small stream poling trips.

ImageFH000006 by Mike McCrea, on Flickr

On group river trips poling companions are usually snubbing downstream, where standing tall gives them a better view of the rocks and shallows ahead.

ImageIMG000 by Mike McCrea, on Flickr

Closet rod pole, one of mine in fact, with a black band painted on at the center balance point.

ImageIMG001 by Mike McCrea, on Flickr

Soloized Penobscot, soloized Explorer. The vee bottom of the Explorer make for a fine poling canoe

ImageIMG004 by Mike McCrea, on Flickr

ImageIMG005 by Mike McCrea, on Flickr

Even on downstream trips poler companions will pause at small rapids for some upstream play.

ImageIMG015 by Mike McCrea, on Flickr

Fun to sit and watch, especially the occasional “Oh shit” moments.

ImageIMG018 by Mike McCrea, on Flickr

I am a dedicated sitter, but it is fun to look downstream and see a poling contingent standing tall ahead.

ImageIMG022 by Mike McCrea, on Flickr

ImageIMG003 by Mike McCrea, on Flickr

If there is no “aggressive step out” I’ll follow their line.


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PostPosted: December 12th, 2021, 9:39 am 
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Joined: May 6th, 2005, 12:52 am
Posts: 127
Location: Ottawa
On pole size. From my experience with several aluminum poles.
I am over 6 ft tall, and sometimes find 12 ft pole a bit better than 11 ft. With my lovely 11-ft 2-piece pole I find I am jugging hand positions to get it a few inches deeper in the water more often than the 12-ft. Maybe optimum length is (2 x height) ???
Diameter I use 1" or 1.125" with the latter a bit better for grip. I have used 1.25" but my hands/wrists are a bit small to find that comfortable.
YMMV of course.

Lovely pictures Mike. Makes me want to go out for a paddle and pole....

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PostPosted: December 12th, 2021, 1:30 pm 
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Joined: June 28th, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 2097
Location: Freeland, Maryland USA
vpsoccer wrote:
On pole size. From my experience with several aluminum poles.
I am over 6 ft tall, and sometimes find 12 ft pole a bit better than 11 ft. With my lovely 11-ft 2-piece pole I find I am jugging hand positions to get it a few inches deeper in the water more often than the 12-ft. Maybe optimum length is (2 x height) ???
Diameter I use 1" or 1.125" with the latter a bit better for grip. I have used 1.25" but my hands/wrists are a bit small to find that comfortable.
YMMV of course.


Length and diameter are certainly a matter of personal preference for weight, hand-size grip and type of craft/waters. The Lewis and Clark expedition brought 18 foot long setting poles shod with iron as part of their gear. Humans may have been shorter back then, but barge pusher men were made of tough stuff.

I have good sized hands (and feet to match). In an admittedly limited amount of poling I was happiest with a 1 ¼” closet rod pole, which is what my sons prefer over our aluminum poles; just feels nicer in hand. Although carbon felt nice too, kinda like wood or carbon/glass vs aluminum paddle shafts.

One of the aluminum poles is a one-piece 1” x 11’ sailboat spar, flotsam found washed up on a peninsula point on the Chesapeake Bay. A non take-apart pole usually means strapping it to the roof racks or inside the canoe for transport. And a take apart aluminum pole is easy enough to make; Fred’s DIY aluminum pole page:

https://ravensjester.smugmug.com/Boats/ ... -Aluminum/

Aluminum tubing from Texas Towers, and a couple easy parts. I expect there is a similar ham radio antenna tubing source in Canada. The sleevable square stock can be not-for-poles DIY handy as well.

http://www.texastowers.com/aluminum.htm

A friend on the smaller size uses that 1” dia spar pole, and that found a treasure trip was a good one. With one disgusting memory; the aluminum sailboat spar wasn’t the only thing washed up on that debris trapping windage point. Just behind a fringe of invasive Phragmites was this horrific sight.

ImageIMG016 by Mike McCrea, on Flickr

That rim of plastic water bottle trash stretched for 50 yards in either direction; beautiful sandy beach, aesthetic ruined if you looked inland. If those had each been redeemable for a nickel each we’d have been rich, and needed bigger boats. What is wrong with people; buy water, the same stuff that comes out of your sink, and then throw the empty plastic bottle overboard? Twain was right, the more I learn about people, the more I like my dog.
(Rant over)

FWIW, the DIY’ed take-apart Texas Towers pole with attachable paddle blade and tee grip.

ImageDSCF1997 by Mike McCrea, on Flickr
ImageDSCF1995 by Mike McCrea, on Flickr

I wanted to make sure the take-apart (or taken apart for stand-up paddle) pieces each floated, so I stuffed them with a long strip of foam pipe insulation. The “ferrule” sleeve connection, tee grip and paddle blade all use button clips, so not exactly watertight.

ImageDSCF1972 by Mike McCrea, on Flickr

Really junky old paddle blade, but the aluminum shaft OD was a perfect match for the Texas Towers aluminum pole ID.

ImageDSCF1987 by Mike McCrea, on Flickr

Dang, now I want to make another pole. Hmmm, I have a 15” long carbon fiber ferrule with a 1 1/8” ID. Might be a fun take-apart wood pole project if I can find a decent closet rod; making a pole is good, easy shop fun that requires minimal tools.


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PostPosted: December 12th, 2021, 6:26 pm 
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Joined: March 23rd, 2006, 11:21 pm
Posts: 1271
Location: Burns Lake, BC
CraigB,

I don't know the brand of my 12' carbon pole but it's made with 1/16" material.
(at least that's as close as my caliper gets)

Nice shots Mike.


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PostPosted: December 15th, 2021, 3:40 pm 
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Joined: June 28th, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 2097
Location: Freeland, Maryland USA
Members of that poling contingent had a thing about not sitting.

ImageIMG021 by Mike McCrea, on Flickr

Crouch, bend sideways and finagle a 12’ pole through the branches before taking a seat. Pride cometh before a fall.


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PostPosted: December 16th, 2021, 6:41 am 
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Joined: June 28th, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 2097
Location: Freeland, Maryland USA
Tom was occasionally willing, or forced, to relinquish his pole, but only in extremis.

ImageIMG025 by Mike McCrea, on Flickr

About pride, and falls, the “step out” photo of Tom and Mobey has a memorable back story. Tom was poling sweep on a group trip. Just downstream of some bouncy water the group took a shore break. Standing beside our canoes on the bank Tom poled into view and got his camera out to take a photo of us, leaning the canoe on edge to turn it and better frame the shot.

Someone said “Wow, he’s really good”. Seconds later Tom was wet from the waist down, so technically just an aggressive step out.

Tom’s new, expensive, not-waterproof camera did not survive. The SD card did, and the three photos Tom took told the tale. The first featured a horizontal horizon, the second a slanted horizon and the third a blurry, near vertical horizon.

My favorite after-the-fall poling photo is friend and poler extraordinaire Doug, taken mere minutes after he proudly intoned for all to hear “I haven't swum in fifteen years”.

ImageIMG022 by Mike McCrea, on Flickr

I believe he is indicating “I’m number one”. Still smiling though.


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