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 Post subject: Re: Portaging Footwear
PostPosted: March 6th, 2018, 3:40 pm 
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Joined: November 7th, 2010, 4:35 pm
Posts: 323
I've heard good things about the 5.10 Canyoneer and Water Tennie, especially in terms of traction on slippery rock, but just checking on their website it appears they've been bought out by Addidas and those two are no longer available.

Alan


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 Post subject: Re: Portaging Footwear
PostPosted: March 6th, 2018, 7:03 pm 
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Early and late season I go with rubber boots. In midwest usa Farm and Fleet stores sell Servus rubber boots for under $35 and they last.

In warmer times I drill drain holes in a well fitting work boot and make sure they are not made with card board inside. Years of tripping and happy with the strategy. On the longest portages I may switch to my good camp boot if its a dry one. On a long trip I make sure my camp foot wear is capable of all around use in case of portage boot failure.

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 Post subject: Re: Portaging Footwear
PostPosted: March 6th, 2018, 9:07 pm 
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Joined: August 10th, 2016, 9:37 am
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This really does just seem to come down to whatever you feel the cost comfortable and the safest in.


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 Post subject: Re: Portaging Footwear
PostPosted: March 10th, 2018, 4:18 pm 
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Joined: November 6th, 2004, 9:31 pm
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Rubber boots with wool socks and felt insoles. Easy to slip off to get more comfortable in the boat, wring out the socks and replace the insoles after a soaking and you're warm and dry again in minutes.


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 Post subject: Re: Portaging Footwear
PostPosted: March 31st, 2018, 7:49 am 
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Joined: May 9th, 2013, 6:28 pm
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I used to paddle and portage in the Keen sandals that so many paddlers wear, but gave them up because they collect so many stones, twigs, etc., and don't provide ankle support. Now I wear old running shoes (they will stink and come apart after a while) or water shoes like Columbia Drainmaker or Salomon CrossAmphibian. They drain & dry quickly and have a bit more ankle support than sandals.

If I know the route I'm doing has a longer, rougher portage, I'll keep a pair of mid-height day hikers (and socks) handy and change into them when I get on land. I do the portage in the hikers (they have prevented more than one sprained ankle) and then change back into whatever I wear in the canoe before getting back in the boat. That way, the hikers stay dry (as long as the portage is not too wet).

You want to always have one set of dry footwear for camp. Waterproof hikers will keep your feet dry, but your feet will still get cold if the boots are wet and take a long time to dry in cool weather.


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 Post subject: Re: Portaging Footwear
PostPosted: March 31st, 2018, 8:13 am 
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Joined: December 19th, 2006, 8:47 pm
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Location: Rattlesnake Pond ME
Alan Gage wrote:
I've heard good things about the 5.10 Canyoneer and Water Tennie, especially in terms of traction on slippery rock, but just checking on their website it appears they've been bought out by Addidas and those two are no longer available.

Alan

I found them on Amazon

https://www.amazon.com/Five-Ten-Mens-Ca ... th=1&psc=1

True they have been dc'ed.. But there is still limited stock.


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 Post subject: Re: Portaging Footwear
PostPosted: March 31st, 2018, 3:55 pm 
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Joined: March 30th, 2010, 4:10 pm
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Location: Ringwood, NJ
Alan[/quote]
I found them on Amazon

https://www.amazon.com/Five-Ten-Mens-Ca ... th=1&psc=1

True they have been dc'ed.. But there is still limited stock.[/quote]
Well worth their price. Great traction in the water as well as on lengthy and rocky portages. I found them very comfortable, unlike some Amazon reviewers did. Huge improvement compared to Canyoneer 1.

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 Post subject: Re: Portaging Footwear
PostPosted: March 31st, 2018, 8:59 pm 
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Joined: June 21st, 2015, 7:06 pm
Posts: 25
I used to like regular rubber boots, but now I'm sold on the 17" Tingley rubber overshoe worn over a running shoe. Advantages:

1. Very flexible and light, so it is nearly as comfortable as wearing a running shoe.

2. If the weather turns hot, you can roll them up and easily stow them in a pack, and wetfoot in your running shoes if you desire.

3. the rubber clings to your calf underwater, so if you do overtop them, you don't get much water in them.

4. If you do get them wet, you can turn them inside out and quickly dry out the inside.

5. You can carry an innertube patch kit, and apply a patch in the field that will last for years. I haven't had to on a trip yet though.

Disadvantages:

1. Hard to put on and take off.

2. Butt ugly. You won't be on the cover of outside magazine! At least according to my daughter.


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 Post subject: Re: Portaging Footwear
PostPosted: April 1st, 2018, 6:51 am 
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How hard could it be? Portaging footwear is a lot easier than portaging a canoe :lol: you can either wear the footwear and just walk across the portage, or carry your shoes/boots/whatever as you wear something else on your feet. Some people tie their shoes to a thwart on the canoe and let them dangle during the carry, or put them in a plastic bag or dry bag and carry them on on in a pack. Just don't carry them one at a time, or you will have to traverse the portage 3 (or more) times. Thats how you portage footwear. :wink:

Kidding aside, I have a couple of different kinds of Merrell water shoes, one pair does have fair ankle support. When racing where there are portages, I do not worry about wet feet, as there is no time to change during a race. I wear the same shoes or boots in and out of the canoe. Otherwise, if it it not too hot I might wear a pair of Chota Trekker boots, that have lots of support. If on a serious long backcountry trip I will change into my regular leather hiking boots.


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 Post subject: Re: Portaging Footwear
PostPosted: April 1st, 2018, 7:51 pm 
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If you want something for summer that dries fast and is a running shoe with no need for big ancle support then consider the Columbia Drainmaker. We each have a pair and they are holding up nicely. End of season they are much cheaper if you can get your size. We find them great. More closed in than sandals but sand can get in the drain holes. Decent grip. We use them on the good old shield not the beach. Fall yes plain old rubbers boots are ok if a bit of a battle between height-comfort-keep the wet out.


Last edited by steve.of.london on May 22nd, 2018, 3:28 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Portaging Footwear
PostPosted: April 6th, 2018, 3:02 pm 
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I have worn the Chota Quetico Trekkers (only available from either the Chota website or from Piragis in Ely, MN. I know there are other options that may be better, but those boots have prevented rolled ankles many times. And when going solo in the remote wilderness a broken ankle could be a death sentence. You could also look at the Morrell Moab or the military SEAL team amphibious boots.


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 Post subject: Re: Portaging Footwear
PostPosted: May 22nd, 2018, 7:10 am 
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I went to Trailhead a couple of weeks ago intending to buy the NRS workboots mentioned earlier in this thread but they don't even come close to going on my feet. The size 9 I could not even get on - I have a slightly high instep but not massively high like some. I fought and fought and no luck. So I tried the size 10 and after a good deal of fighting I did get one on, but the fit was too narrow. My feet are slightly wide as well.

Oddly enough I tried the next series of NRS boot down from the workboots and the size 10 is a great fit. They zip down the side so they are easy to get on and off, and they are a wider boot than the workboots.

Too bad, I was really looking forward to being just like a Navy Seal! :-)


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 Post subject: Re: Portaging Footwear
PostPosted: May 22nd, 2018, 4:18 pm 
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Joined: June 20th, 2001, 7:00 pm
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Location: Toronto, Ontario Canada
The NRS workbooks are SMALL, I normally wear size 9.5 for regular shoes or boots, for the NRS even a size 11 is very tight and that's with thin socks, I'm probably going to move up to 12's for the next pair.

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 Post subject: Re: Portaging Footwear
PostPosted: May 22nd, 2018, 4:26 pm 
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Maybe I'll try an 11 next time but then I think they'd be too long for me but the width would be OK


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