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PostPosted: October 20th, 2021, 3:16 pm 
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Joined: September 28th, 2021, 12:57 pm
Posts: 4
Hi all,

I'm quite torn up about this, so appreciate keeping civil & topic focused on our goal of finding replacement knives.

Zip version: About 15 yrs ago friends strongly recommended Grohmann, bought a few for myself, friend's wedding gift, and recently my partner. People said Carbon holds an edge better, got hers in Carbon, it died almost instantly on a its first trip. Day 1 badly tarnished, by day 4 - 5 it had dozens of black corrosion pitting marks. She cleaned and dried that knife immediately after every use. Grohmann told us to kick rocks. Very long & polite email exchange including *begging* for their help, even offering to pay to have them swap a stainless blade into her original handle for sentimental value (was her first wilderness canoe trip). Kick rocks, nothing we can do, buy a new one.

We don't deal with or support companies like this.

Looking for recommendations for great quality handmade knives, ideally in Canada, but US OK too. We want a company that is at least a few decades old & has demonstrated excellent customer service over their history. Sorry, not really interested in hobby hand makers who may or may not be there in 10, 20 yrs to support. But my mind could be changed on this, I suppose, if your wisdom said otherwise.

I'll be selling 2 Grohmann D.H. Russel #4 belt knives extremely cheap. They have no value. And I don't want to carry mine anymore, I don't want the memories associated with this company. I'm quite sad, it has been my knife for about 15 years, and been on many trips with me. [Not asking for offers here, will post in other Buy & Sell thread or IRL.]

I sincerely appreciate any recommendations. Thank you,

-C


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PostPosted: October 20th, 2021, 3:59 pm 
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Joined: August 19th, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 754
Location: Simcoe, Ontario Canada
https://postknives.com/

Watch the video.

I have a small Post belt knife (model 105). The workmanship is amazing.

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PostPosted: October 20th, 2021, 5:16 pm 
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Joined: July 17th, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 1659
Location: Toronto, Ontario Canada
Look at this web site:
https://www.madeinmooseland.ca/knives-made-in-canada/

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PostPosted: October 20th, 2021, 9:36 pm 
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Joined: December 9th, 2012, 9:57 am
Posts: 395
My son and I are both happy customers.
https://mossingtonknives.com/


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PostPosted: October 21st, 2021, 6:10 am 
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Joined: February 28th, 2018, 10:54 am
Posts: 126
Location: SW Quebec
I'm happy with my Bark River.


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PostPosted: October 21st, 2021, 8:14 am 
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Joined: February 18th, 2021, 9:21 am
Posts: 61
I'm sorry I dont have any replacement recommendations (I carry a classic buck knife, myself) and i'm sorry you had such a bad experience with Grohmann.

If I might be able to interject an observation though.

This reminds me a little bit of my favourite movie - michael mann's 1992 The Last of the Mohicans. I watched this 36 times in theatre, and probably hundreds of times since then at home. I eventually wore out my VHS copy, and so I went to the store and bought the new DVD version. Little did I know, that would start a ten year odyssey that would result in me owning 15 different DVD copies! Long story short, as it turns out when it came time to make the DVD release, Michael Mann decided to re-cut the film. Thus the DVD release was the "new director's cut" . The new cut was an abomination though. He removed so many great scenes, and added back in a number of bad scenes which had clearly been edited out originally for good reason. The result was an unwatchable monstrosity, and my epic efforts since have focused on procuring a copy of the original theatrical release.

What does all that have to do with knives (besides the fact that Hawkeye was very handy with one?)?

For many years I would watch the original movie and marvel at what a perfect production it was. Who was this michael mann, I wondered, who could make such a perfect movie?

Then when I saw the terrible directors cuts (he tried several times to fix his mistake, with each new version of the re-cut being worse than the last!) I was shocked, and could not understand how the same person who had made the original movie could also have made such a terrible re-cut.

What that experience got me on to was the philosophical distinction between the work and the person who made the work.

And that is a subject that gets considered and discussed, in, albeit, a rather shallow manner, every time some artist who has produced some important work of art but is later found to have some big problem in their personal life, and so then everyone has to debate whether it is ok to still appreciate the art while disapproving of the artist.

On a much more personal level though, every child has to go through this as they grow up and discover that their parents are people too - real people who, unlike the idealised version that the child perceived when they were young, have made real mistakes and have real faults. We discover, for example, that our grandfather actually had some racist tendencies, and so we have to struggle through how to reconcile that - how do we separate the warm, loving grandfather we knew from the grandfather who used that racist phrase and wouldn't let his kids date someone of another race? How do we continue to love one while rejecting the other? It's a difficult dance that requires hard growth in our emotional maturity, but if we try, we can do it, and we reach a stage that psychologists call the "second naivete" .

Anyway, all that is a long and possible off-topic comment, but it just occurred to me that the grohmann knife you've carried for so long does not necessarily need to be tainted by your recent experiences. If you wanted - and you would have to want to, and if you dont want to, that's fine too - but if you wanted, you could teach yourself to respect your long-appreciated knife on its own terms, aside from the context of the people who made it, just like we can learn to appreciate parents who have their human faults, art made by problematic artists, canoes made by anti-vaxers, or - dare I say it - even the original version of a movie.

Good luck with your knife!


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PostPosted: October 21st, 2021, 8:35 am 
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Joined: September 28th, 2021, 12:57 pm
Posts: 4
@Callee: Wow. Just...wow. Thank you so much for taking the time to write this. There is a lot to think about. If it were just my knife, I feel I would take these words to heart, and keep my knife. I think you are very right. However, the sting that would remain is that we really loved carrying the same knife. I know, I know, silly romantics! And hers is irreparably damaged. And we now know the company will do nothing for us in the future. We have little interest in buying another from them. But you've given us lots to think about, so thank you.

@All Others: Thank you so much for taking time to reply. We sincerely appreciate it. It's a bit of an emotional time. Didn't expect it to be so! A knife just has such a core connection to you in the wilderness. You, knife, compass, and all will be well. I fully expected to hand this knife to my son or daughter, one day. To think I have to toss the history we have together in the trash is a bit heartbreaking.

We'll be reviewing *all* of your recommendations in depth, including all that are made after this comment, before buying. We really appreciate your help. Thank you.

Edit: Have checked out a few things. I really love this community. It's an honour & pleasure to be a member. We're very grateful that all of you are trying to help us get through this tough nut, and that you all kinda understand & know where we're coming from, as you all also have "your knife", which has been by your side through thick and thin for years. And hate the thought of having to get rid of it.

Thank you all.


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PostPosted: October 21st, 2021, 3:04 pm 
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Joined: October 11th, 2021, 4:19 pm
Posts: 45
Callee wrote:
What that experience got me on to was the philosophical distinction between the work and the person who made the work.!


Excellent post. Very well thought-out. Thank-you Callee.

I'm much like the OP, in that I become 'used' to a certain knife (and certain pieces of gear) after awhile. It'a double-edge though. The loss of, or inability to replace becomes an uncomfortable obsession with me.
Strangely. I've also discovered that if I (force myself to) give my knife to someone in good will, a new knife always finds me. Usually quite unexpectedly. This last time a glint from under the moss revealed a nice Premier, ultra-slim folder, that had obviously been buried for decades, and ceaned up nicely. Before that a free-box at a garage sale, before that a find at the bottom of a rust-filled tool-box I had salvaged.

Used hand-tools have good Dharma.
Your next knife will find you.


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