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 Post subject: Re: Perfect Saw Sheath
PostPosted: September 11th, 2022, 8:35 pm 
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not sure if the blade will serve as magnet attract point. probably.
but sounds iffy/experimental to me so im gonna stick with 'trusty' velco for the piggy cases.

i might also see if Chris can modify slightly to taper case so its narrower at bottom.
not sure if that's easy enough to do.
wait, that won't work, because gboy pouch will be as wide as case (above) to fit gboy+its case in.

i may request tiny upside down pocket behind yellow handle, to prevent spare blade from sliding out.
or maybe a sleeve for it, as someone suggested.

man purses are great and handy, i carry a mountainsmith drift pack, has hip & shoulder straps
(detachable shoulder straps)
Image

i do really like the (new) MEC waistpacks shape/design but at 1.5L volume they're small.
i could make it work but i rather make work the case, than the contents.
what do you use the black clip for ( tag attached) ? what is volume of your purse?


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 Post subject: Re: Perfect Saw Sheath
PostPosted: September 12th, 2022, 6:57 am 
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Location: Freeland, Maryland USA
remogami wrote:
man purses are great and handy, i carry a mountainsmith drift pack, has hip & shoulder straps

what do you use the black clip for ( tag attached) ? what is volume of your purse?


Two guys talking about their purses, what has the world come to? The Mountainsmith man-purse is an older version of this. IIRC it is 13L in volume.

https://www.amazon.com/Mountainsmith-16 ... 7P7HA?th=1

No way I would ever pay $90 for a man purse; the one I have was an REI Deal of the Day bargain, made from hemp. I have yet to try smoking it, but I did waterproof it (it is lined on the inside).

My previous man purses were small soft-side coolers, which had the advantage of being waterproof, but the disadvantage of lacking any internal pockets for organization.

The previous man purse was this soft side cooler; too much blind grubbing around inside to find what I wanted.

ImageP8310009 by Mike McCrea, on Flickr

The “tag” on the clip, which is also attached to a back-up compass, is a pocket thermometer, a cheap little thing that has to be 20 years old, amazingly still intact and still accurate. There are some other odd doohickies among those essentials.

The wee metal thing between the sheath knife and the Ibuprofen bottle is an adapter for Iso-butane stove canisters, used to refill the Windmill piezo lighter. Paddling in coastal winds a Bic doesn’t cut it.

https://www.bestglide.com/products/wind ... of-lighter

And no, I would not have dropped $65 on a lighter, it was a gift. But it has been through hell and back for the last 15 years and I would buy a replacement in a heartbeat.

The thing in the tube with red caps is a Pocket Bellows.

https://www.amazon.com/Epiphany-Outdoor ... 9915237670

Love that little device, so much that I bought a handful of knock-offs as gifts for friends.

Reading glasses, sunglasses, digital WP pocket camera (in the blue bag), two flashlights, minor boo-boo 1st aid kit, paddling gloves in winter and etc that Mountainsmith bag gets fairly full, and the interior pockets and sleeves are an organizational boon.


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 Post subject: Re: Perfect Saw Sheath
PostPosted: November 19th, 2022, 3:47 pm 
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Joined: June 28th, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 2467
Location: Freeland, Maryland USA
Quote:
The folding Gomboy, which I appreciate as an always-available saw, weighs an acceptable 1O ounces, and folds down to 10 ½” long by ¾” thick, but the oversized plastic case adds excessive bulk, and another 5oz in weight. That is half the saw’s weight. And twice the bulk, it’s not just the weight of the case, it’s the overkill size.

worse, the Gomboy will only go into the plastic case in one orientation, and I continue to bat .500 on that initial effort, with a now routine muttering of profanities.


Last paddling trip I again realized how klunky/kludgy/bulbous the plastic case Gomboy case was, and how much space it wasted in my essentials bag. I wanted something less bulky, and water-proofish, in case I forget and leave it out overnight sheathed atop the woodpile.

No belt loop lash, I don’t carry the saw in that fashion. No floatation added, although that would have been as easy as putting a piece of foam inside the sheath; if I drop the saw during in-canoe branchy sweeper cutting I’m probably dropping the saw itself overboard, not the saw in the sheath. The Gomboy, when not in use, lives in my essentials bag, which does have supplemental floatation.

Not even a grommet, just the simplest saw sheath I can make. I do not sew even a little if I can help it, so that made the choice of material easy; heat sealable Packcloth. I had some red remains on a roll that will do nicely, and cut an 8” x 18” rectangle from that material.

ImagePB180001 by Mike McCrea, on Flickr

I cut up the extra 8” along the full width of that 58” roll while I was at it, in part so I had a straight edge to work with the next time I used it. But I had a plan for the “scrap”; I’ve made a dozen or more red overhang flags for roof racked boats from that stuff, but most have headed up the driveway on someone else’s canoe, and I have but one or two left for our own use.

ImagePB180007 by Mike McCrea, on Flickr

The Gomboy is only 11” long, but I had plans for the 18” sleeve. First a nice even seam ironed up the long edge, folded over heat-sealable sides ironed together, using the usual cardboard ironing sub-surface and a wood fence for a straight heat-sealed hem.

ImagePB180006 by Mike McCrea, on Flickr

The clock with sweep second hand is important; needing 25-30 seconds on every inch of the heat sealed seam it is easy to lose track of time and proceed to quickly. Then a wider heat sealed seam at the bottom, to better resist the Gomboy being dropped inside the sheath. Although, once properly heat sealed together, that material is damn near impossible to tear apart.

That fits the Gomboy nicely, but there is that 5” of extra sleve left at the top. Cut intentionally long; I had a plan. First a wrap of Gorilla tape at the open end. The Gorilla tape stiffens the open end edges, like the thick black vinyl fold overs on many dry bags. You can see where I’m going with this. Plenty of extra sheath length for three fold-overs.

I needed some way to hold the “dry bag” sheath fold-overs closed. Dry bag style side release buckles would be overkill, and a snap awkward. I know I dissed Velcro hard in this thread, but in this KISS saw sheath it seemed the best, and easiest, choice.

A couple short pieces of self adhesive Velcro, each with a bead of flexible Loctite “Vinyl, Fabric and Plastic Adhesive” around the perimeter to make sure they stayed stuck when pulled apart. The Loctite lays thin enough that it won’t interfere with hook to loop adhesion.

ImagePB180010 by Mike McCrea, on Flickr

While the Loctite set up I turned back to Flagman duties. The overhang flags don’t need to be excessively large, although there is purportedly some “1 square foot of flag” regulation in a few states. I doubt that regulation is often enforced; I’ve driven Maine to Florida and cross country more than once dangling a red rag, sometimes just a red sock.

I do want the flags long enough to dangle near face level, as a “Don’t bonk your noggin on the boat (or, worse, a rudder)” warning, for me or other wander abouts. That is more a matter of how long to make the tie down cords to dangle warningly. Rounding off the flag ends that go flappityflap at highway speeds seems to help with longevity, or maybe I just prefer the aesthetics of rounded ends.

ImagePB180011 by Mike McCrea, on Flickr

Ends rounded, then a grommet seated in each flag. Pounding a grommet kit punch through that Packcloth is an exercise in hammer smashing futility. Melting a sealed hole through with a hot nail head is quick and easy. The “What size nail head to use?” quandary was also easy; I had left the correct nail in with each grommet kit. Maybe I am smarter than I look.

ImagePB180012 by Mike McCrea, on Flickr

Melt sealed holes ready tap for grommets the pièce de résistance on those overhang flags is a squib of prismatic reflective tape on each side. That reflective tape doesn’t need to be big, even a small piece on either side is surprisingly effective in a peculiar way.

ImagePB180014 by Mike McCrea, on Flickr

Quote:
All of the boats got red flags with prismatic reflective tape. Joel and I have both noted that the winky blinky of the reflective tape in car headlights at night keeps people from riding our bumpers. Blessed is the red flag with reflective tape; I detest tailgaters, especially glaring headlights in the mirrors at night.


ImagePB030013 by Mike McCrea, on Flickr

Each of the new red flag shop supply got a piece of prismatic tape on both sides, and each piece of tape got a bead of Locktite adhesive. The adhesive on that tape is quite tenacious, at least in canoe hull application, but in 70mph flappage the Loctite can’t hurt.

Experimentally (at first) the prismatic tape on the reverse got a bead of E-6000; thinking time would tell which adhesive bead fares better in flappage and UV/weather exposure. The perimeter of the grommets likewise got a bead of E-6000, to soften the transition between sharp edge brass grommet and Packcloth, also can’t hurt.

A shop stash of 10 new prismatic winkyblink red flags oughta hold me for a while. Of course I said that last time. I had some thin line with reflective tracer; black guy line that came with some tarp. Reflective or not, black guy lines are a terrible idea. And a mini-beener for quick connect

ImagePB190028 by Mike McCrea, on Flickr

I need to buy a handful of cheap minibeeners; I’m not giving away the stainless steel ones, nor the gated CCS mini beeners. Cheap beeners will do fine for give aways.

The saw sheath dry bag got prismatic tape on both sides as well, for nighttime flashlight “Where did I set the saw?” revelations.

ImagePB190029 by Mike McCrea, on Flickr

For my simplistic purposes the slender dry bag sheath is perfect, and not, like the OEM case, freaking uni-directional, the Gomboy fits in any orientation. I should have made one after the first trip with the Gomboy’s ridiculous plastic case.

I cannot imagine a future use for that OEM Gomboy sheath. But I hate to throw material away; who knows when I’ll need a piece of clear plastic to make a tiny window. Probably never.

One minor boo boo on the saw sheath; I should have made the Velco closure full width for a better seal. I’ll leave it be for now, I’m not planning on submerged waterproof; if that Velcro ever peels off the heat sealable Packcloth I can replace it with full width pieces for a better seal.

That proved easy enough to make a custom sized “dry bag” sheath for any folding saw. Not counting the wait time for the Loctite or E-6000 to set up the sheath, and the flags, were a couple hour’s work, and half of that was clock watching while holding an iron.

I almost wish I had a couple more folding saws. Which I do; everyone likely has a Sven Saw somewhere, but the Gomboy does everything I need.


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 Post subject: Re: Perfect Saw Sheath
PostPosted: November 20th, 2022, 4:54 am 
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looks great mike, nice.
hard to get any more red than that, what a popping color.

"I know I dissed Velcro hard in this thread, but in this KISS saw sheath it seemed the best, and easiest,
choice."

lol that's funny. perfect match for the case for sure.

i think for the gomboy i'm going to do something similar. though i might ask chris to make a couple small cases. i think i prefer that over piggyback.
because the gomboy (when the bowsaw is around) can just as well be in my pocket, or in a pack pocket.

and when the bowsaw isn't around, the gomboy would be carried on me. things more streamlined by having it not stationed at bowsaw.

if we didn't have pant pockets, i think i would think differently about it.
(or if the gomboy was bigger).

anyway, nice flags. great idea.
amazon (i'm sure you know) has those cheap coghlan's biners, various sizes, in bulk. probably even cheaper ones on there.

lol no one has claimed that gomboy case i offered yet.
maybe i can use it as a toothbrush holder for on the road, can wear it on my belt.


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 Post subject: Re: Perfect Saw Sheath
PostPosted: November 20th, 2022, 11:22 am 
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ps if you're shoving it into your pocket on river/port/campwood repeatedly
the bottom |__| shape might snag pockets.

may not be big deal for you but for me it sort of is i think. if you wanted a more aerodynamic bottom, maybe you could trim (round) the corners with scissors.

i know this would reduce the height of the sealed area there. maybe you could seal it further up, to make up for it. might get a nice U bottom this way rather than a |__| bottom


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 Post subject: Re: Perfect Saw Sheath
PostPosted: November 20th, 2022, 1:33 pm 
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Joined: June 28th, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 2467
Location: Freeland, Maryland USA
remogami wrote:
amazon (i'm sure you know) has those cheap coghlan's biners, various sizes, in bulk. probably even cheaper ones on there.


Great minds. I ordered a 20-pack of 2 ¼” minibeeners last night. I could have ordered a 100 pack of smaller mini beeners for a few bucks more, but was suspect of the quality at that cost/quantity. Those flag attachment beeners don’t need to be high quality, Walmart aluminum cheapies have held up fine.

remogami wrote:
ps if you're shoving it into your pocket on river/port/campwood repeatedly
the bottom |__| shape might snag pockets.
may not be big deal for you but for me it sort of is i think. if you wanted a more aerodynamic bottom, maybe you could trim (round) the corners with scissors.
i know this would reduce the height of the sealed area there. maybe you could seal it further up, to make up for it. might get a nice U bottom this way rather than a |__| bottom


Excellent idea. Right angle corners are more prone to wear, and I do round off the bottom corners on some heat sealable bags, or iron over a dog-ear triangle flap and install grommets as dry bag end tie down points.

Easily done on the Gomboy sheath. The sheath was overlong as initially made; I could have done a 4th fold over with the excess material, but test rolled a 4th time the “seal” was overly bulbous. Adding to the 1” heat sealed hem at the bottom I (re)ironed a 2 ¾” hem.

That not only made the saw fit much better lengthwise, with less excess interior sleeve, but once the bottom end was cut half round it have me a wide expanse of putting green in which to sink a tee.

I mean install a grommet, same as on the dry bag dog eared corners. I know I said “no grommets” (hey, I said “No Velcro”), but realized that I abhor things left on the ground to be stepped on, buried unnoticed in leaf litter when packing up, become mud caked from rain spatter, etc. OK, mostly my back doesn’t enjoy bending over to pick up things on the ground.

A single grommet punched in that rounded expanse, a short loop of cord and I can hang the Gomboy in plain sight.

There was a denouement to flag Day. In a fortuitous turn of events shortly after the new batch of flags were finished Tom and Finn, a purebred West Virginia Porch Hound rescue, stopped by. Finn is the ideal lazy-hound lay on the floor shop dog. Tom is another shop story.

Tom and Finn were unexpected visitors. My young friend Eddie and I were mid-way through adapting new Yakima bars, towers and saddles to his car, which put a brief kink in our progress as we were already semi-confused without Tom’s help.

Tom is my acid test for anything; can it survive Tom? If so it is proven rock solid. Tom had an older red flag on his vintage glass Explorer, his preferred poling canoe. Tom does not take the Explorer off his truck, or previously off his van. For years, and counting, the Explorer lives there, 24/7/365. After many moons of constant weather exposure and highway flappage the reflective tape was reflective no more. And the red flag had fading to pinkish.

ImagePB190026 by Mike McCrea, on Flickr

There is some history there, one paddle trip birthday party for Tom I arranged that all of his gifts be pink. Everyone should have such a friend, if only to keep them in the pink.

I may come to regret it, but I told Tom the flags came with a lifetime guarantee, and gave him a new one. I did keep the pink number, and installed new prismatic tape. At some point I’ll do a switcheroo and put the pink one on his canoe so the flag longevity experimental abuse can continue. That new one was just a loaner Tom.

The fortuitous “experimental” part was that the E-6000 around both the defunct tape and the grommet on Tom’s pink flag had stood the test of time, so I added a bead of that atop the Loctite sealed tape sides on the new batch of flags.

In a moment of weakness I finally offered Tom the use of my shop in which to work on that battered Explorer; a canoe I first rebuilt nearly 20 years ago.

I even offered to send him a materials list; he could buy the cloth and epoxy and I would help do the much needed repairs, including removing two of the three poling superfluous seats, and laying a full length Dynel keel strip down the see-through-vee bottom.

He deigned that offer, with a variety of inexplicable excuses. Which was a shame; I had plans to buy an elevated Directors Chair, plant my ass there in the shop and say helpful things like “No, no Tom, not like that” while I watched.

Oh well, once that bottom vee finally wears through and a geyser of water suddenly fills the Explorer on a poling trip I’ll offer him $100 for it. It is an early Vermont Explorer, and one of my first rotted gunwale derelict rebuilds; I’d love another shot at it to continue the recent tradition of re-rebuilding early (lack of) craftsmanship canoe rehabs.


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 Post subject: Re: Perfect Saw Sheath
PostPosted: November 21st, 2022, 8:36 am 
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i like it,
nice and sleek, wont feel anything bigger than the saw itself in pocket.
yet nevertheless protected,
great color too for a tool in the raggedy woods half the time.

grommet on end is perfecto addon. suddenly the saw can wait & ride in a billion places (from a couple).
holes are one of the most valuable things on canoe trips lol.

imagine if no holes existed, from cup handles to d rings to daisy chains, to tabs, to grab loops, to webbing buckles (use holes to snap/lock into), to fish nets (a kind of inverse benefit), to the interior of a pack.
the hole is the secret to everything. i generally put them everywhere., but it's funny, because at the end of the day i put nothing at all.


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 Post subject: Re: Perfect Saw Sheath
PostPosted: November 21st, 2022, 8:50 am 
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ps..
velcro works by linking 2 holes together lol


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 Post subject: Re: Perfect Saw Sheath
PostPosted: November 21st, 2022, 10:00 am 
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Location: Sunny Wasaga Beach
Hey Mike,

I always enjoy your posts. Usually, you manage a yarn or 2 amidst the eqpt details. Great tip re the reflective tape. I rarely drive much at night esp with a canoe----moose, y'know. Any of those cute little creatures in Maine? When I do, likely w/o the canoe, I will see what I can do to rig one that flaps at tailgaters. Maybe a tent pole attached to the rack with a flag at the end of it.


remogami wrote:
imagine if no holes existed, from cup handles to d rings to daisy chains, to tabs, to grab loops, to webbing buckles (use holes to snap/lock into), to fish nets (a kind of inverse benefit), to the interior of a pack.
the hole is the secret to everything. i generally put them everywhere., but it's funny, because at the end of the day i put nothing at all.


Quite!! That's why I think Calvin Q Calculus show have rec'd a big award when he invented the portable hole! :)

_________________

Old canoeists never die---they just smell that way.



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 Post subject: Re: Perfect Saw Sheath
PostPosted: November 22nd, 2022, 4:52 pm 
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lol portable hole is a perfect name


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 Post subject: Re: Perfect Saw Sheath
PostPosted: November 25th, 2022, 2:19 pm 
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Location: Freeland, Maryland USA
The Gomboy sheath absolutely benefited from the grommet, some cord and a mini beener.

ImagePB230013 by Mike McCrea, on Flickr

I like the eye level hangability.

And it fits fairly flat in the bottom of the essential bag, unlike the plastic case.

ImagePB230018 by Mike McCrea, on Flickr

wotrock wrote:
Great tip re the reflective tape. I rarely drive much at night esp with a canoe----moose, y'know. Any of those cute little creatures in Maine? When I do, likely w/o the canoe, I will see what I can do to rig one that flaps at tailgaters. Maybe a tent pole attached to the rack with a flag at the end of it.


With that prismatic tape overhang flag confirmed as a headlight back-off I have been meaning to put a couple pieces on the top of the truck cap and lower on the bumper. Those might not winkyblink like a flapping flag, but headlight illuminated they will still shine at a distance, and might give speeding tailgaters “Slow down, what IS that up ahead?” pause.

I thought about adding that reflective tape to the back of the truck for years, never did anything about it. Thanks for the reminder

ImagePB230015 by Mike McCrea, on Flickr

I haven’t driven much last few days; I entered a short stretch of self-imposed driving exile.

There are three long-holiday weekends where I lay in a case of beer beforehand and then will not cross my property lines ‘til it’s over; Labor Day, Independence Day and Memorial Day. Too many people out and about, doing things they have never done before and at which they prove to be not very good, including “Hold my beer and watch this” nonsense.

This week’s “Stay off the roads” is brought to you by Thanksgiving, and by the opening day of deer firearms season.

Thanksgiving “We’re driving to Mom Mom and Pop Pop’s house” equals lots of out-of-State plate vehicles driving on unfamiliar to them highways and byways, so not just heavy traffic but semi-clueless “Which lane do I want, where do I turn?” confusion. That started Wednesday, Thursday typically a highway nightmare, tapering back off Friday into Saturday/Sunday.

And Saturday is the opening day of deer firearms, good day to stay home, or at least out of the woods. Even out of the stream valley on my own property. With the leaves down I can see a tree stand to the right of me, two tree stands in the distance to the left of me, and dawn on Saturday will sound like the Battle of the Bulge. We have already gotten our blaze orange knit caps ready.

I won’t be on the road Saturday. With the boom-boom-boom barrage on opening day deer are hurriedly fleeing across secondary roads in abundance.

Freak a bunch of whitetail, we have way too many. One totaled our Corolla and my wife twice had deer crash into the side of her old CR-V as she was standing on the brakes, both times doing impressive damage. The second leaping gynmast O. virginianus crumpled her right fender, dented the hood as he flipped and somehow hooved the left fender for good measure before limping away.

I have either been very lucky or very cautious. Half of the friends my age have hit a deer at least once. Accent on the “at least once”; I know a couple two-time losers. At least whitetail aren’t Moose gangly legged and as likely to come through the windshield.

Size matters, but an acquaintance heading home from a group coastal trip hit a Japanese Sika Deer, another imported invasive. Those Sika are actually a tiny elk, think 50lbs full grown and well fed. Nonetheless 50lbs of Sika hit at highway speed can do a lot of damage.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sika_deer

I don’t need to harvest bludgeoned deer meat, or diminutive elk, although I’ve never had Sika. I almost lassoed one once. I could have but realized I then have to get the lasso back off.


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