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PostPosted: December 4th, 2022, 12:16 pm 
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Joined: June 28th, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 2480
Location: Freeland, Maryland USA
Some small, cheap, semi-sacrificial tarp accompanies whatever larger tarp on every trip. So many multi-functional uses; wind block, wet/muddy ground staging cover when packing/unpacking gear, over the firewood in the rain, innie or outie in-extremis extra ground cloth, etc, etc. But even a little blue poly job rolls up larger than I’d like, so a small PU coated mini-tarp often accompanies the main tarp.

That auxiliary tarp stays quickly accessible in the canoe; we have grabbed it and hurriedly put up a fast and dirty temporary cover a few times. Or not even “put it up”

On one trip when the boys were young a hailstorm blew in while we were still miles from camp. We couldn’t safely paddle in the gusty winds, and sitting ashore getting pelted by hail quickly proved disagreeable. The missus and I each sat on a corner of the aux tarp to anchor it and held the other end aloft as a roof overhead for the four of us. It worked, the boys kind of enjoyed it, and it provided a memory that didn’t include noggin welts.

Reading the Snow Peak Takibi verbiage in the Guide Tarp thread this material mention was intriguing, “attach the flame-resistant Takibi Inner Roof constructed of aramid fabric to allow for fires underneath the tarp”. I’m not looking for flame proof as much as pinhole spark and lofted ember resistant

A spark resistant auxiliary tarp, erected near the fire’s edge would also satisfy most of the other multi-functional auxiliary uses. Having the wood pile under fireside cover, not dash out in the rain, uncover the wood, grab a log or two, re-anchor the woodpile tarp and get soaked in the process is sounding better all the time.

Dang it Remogami, see what you went and done. Now I’m in search of a spark resistant auxiliary tarp, maybe 8x10 or even 6x8, that could be used as a near-fire “front porch”, perhaps hooked to/in conjunction with a sil-nylon or PU coated main tarp.

Something that isn’t canvas or blue poly bulky/heavy. Dyneema/cuben fiber maybe? Or some other newfangled material resistant to pinhole burns?

For lack of sewing skills it would have to be something manufactured, although I could add grommets or loops as needed as fast tarp-to-tarp attachments for side windblock or fireside connections.

Same quick attachments for tarp to truck (van, SUV, hatchback). I can’t claim many ideas that friend Conk has adopted, but was delighted when he took to and improved the concept of a tripping truck tailgate porch parked near the fire pit.

ImagePA020002 by Mike McCrea, on Flickr

Of course at the cost of a coated nylon or poly cheapie I could patch the spark holes for a few years and then just buy another. I think polyethylene might be more pinhole flying ember resistant than nylon; not sure, probably depends on the PU coating and material thickness.

But I dislike the throw-away aspect in gear, especially if I plan to spend the time to modify it for specific uses. Tarp material suggestions appreciated.


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PostPosted: December 5th, 2022, 9:26 pm 
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Joined: August 16th, 2011, 8:02 pm
Posts: 347
Location: Edmonton area
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Hello Mike, I've tried to post a photo here, but likely failed. Anyway, by way of reply, I wanted to let you know that for the past ten years or so, I've been using a Chinook Technical Outdoors company 9.? x 12.? polyurethane coated
polyester Guide tarp for my tarp pitch, as opposed to a sil-anything tarp, because it is so spark resistant.

I pitch my tarp a short pace from the fire's edge, and usually use a rock wall reflector for the fire. I run a front edge line almost over the fire, pin the back of the tarp to the ground at a 45 degree angle, and push out the middle with a collapsing pole. Instant living room, and I really never get more than a dozen pinholes in a 2 to 5 week trip. And that's with burning black spruce and jack pine.

After a trip, I lay out a strip of Tenacious Tape onto a piece of wood, and using a 3/8" dia hole punch and mallet, bang out enough patches for the tarp each time. Ten years is not exactly a throw away approach, and there is still much life in the tarp. I got a new guide tarp from Chinook last year. Same size and composition as the previous one, but with a silverized interior, which noticeably reflects a lot of heat and light into the shelter area from the fire out front.

I think that you would be surprised at how well a polyester, polyurethane coated tarp can stand up to errant cinders and embers aloft, Mike. Good luck in your hunt, and I will be keeping my eyes on this post as I am always open to new ideas for a more spark resistant tarp myself. Cheers.

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PostPosted: December 5th, 2022, 10:33 pm 
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Joined: March 23rd, 2006, 11:21 pm
Posts: 1300
Location: Burns Lake, BC
I think you guys are going about it wrong.

My silnylon guide tarp is 15 years plus and only has a few tiny holes.
I think a lot of that is because I'm able to move my fire (firebox) to the most efficient spot around camp.

If it's nice the fire is out in the open.
If it's raining the fire is under the (usually) highest corner of the tarp.
If it's windy the fire is near one of the sides of the tarp (whichever pulls the smoke away best).
If it's snowing the fire is under the high side of a lean-to.
If it's super nasty and cold the fire box is tilted 15-20 degrees towards my wife's toes.

So I don't think you need a waxed cotton tarp to deal with burn holes just better fire placement. :D


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PostPosted: December 6th, 2022, 10:48 am 
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Joined: June 28th, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 2480
Location: Freeland, Maryland USA
..
guyfawkes041 wrote:
I got a new guide tarp from Chinook last year. Same size and composition as the previous one, but with a silverized interior, which noticeably reflects a lot of heat and light into the shelter area from the fire out front.


I was wondering if some newfangled Dyneema/Cuben fiber would be more pinhole spark resistant. I’ll never know; those tarps are well out of my price range for that sparky fireside use. But you have provided the “Duh, I already own one” candidate answer.

I use a back-porch awning tarp at the tailgate end of the truck. After sweating out one over-temp desert trip I realized that a silver reflective tarp would be beneficial for reflecting the heat of the sun when parked for the day.

ImageP4171851 by Mike McCrea, on Flickr

Even with a white cap it was oven-hot inside, and the only shade was beneath the canoe overhang. That didn’t do the ice in the cooler any favors, I could make tea with the potable water without needing a stove, and the baked into the gear heat under the cap took a long time to dissipate after sundown, which is my usual bedtime. Improvements were needed.

I found a 9x9 poly tarp, silver reflective on one side; an inexpensive 2lb 2oz Yuedge, surprisingly well made and did some experiments with it under blazing summer sun.

The truck bed under the cap stayed noticeably cooler and, checked in non-desert use with a thermometer and hygrometer, surprisingly less humid. I surmise that there is often dampish gear stored in the back that pumps out moisture as it further dries in the heat.

The sun reflective results were excellent in any environment, except the 9x9 Yuedge wasn’t wide enough to provide cover over the cap’s screened side windows, especially with a canoe on the roof racks. I needed something larger, so I could open cap windows in the rain, and bought another reflective Yuedge, a 10x13 this time.

That size was perfect; extending out over the cap windows.

ImageP5100018 by Mike McCrea, on Flickr

And still providing a decent back porch over the tailgate end.

ImageP5100019 by Mike McCrea, on Flickr

With a canoe (or two) on the roof racks it doesn’t even need poles, the racked canoe keeps it lofted carport high over the windows and tailgate, so set up is as easy as staking down attached side guys. I use a tennis ball with attached cord to throw the far side guy lines over the cap and pull across evenly; easy peezy stake out quick set up. And, when moving on pre-dawn the next morning, fast dark-of-night take down. Pull the stakes, shove everything in a ditty bag, hit the road.

ImagePA010022 by Mike McCrea, on Flickr

Not only a cover for the side windows in the rain, but also a portico between the cap/tailgate end and cab doors. There always seemed to be some piece of gear stored in the cab that I wanted in the rain; “Dang it, the umbrella is up front”. That covered walkway between the cap and cab doors proved advantageous.

That was, as usual, a very long way of saying that I have a 9x9 silver reflective poly tarp that has seen no use in several years. At $30 it will do nicely as a fire’s edge tarp extension, patching pinholes be damned.

quote="guyfawkes041"] After a trip, I lay out a strip of Tenacious Tape onto a piece of wood, and using a 3/8" dia hole punch and mallet, bang out enough patches for the tarp each time. Ten years is not exactly a throw away approach, and there is still much life in the tarp. [/quote]

And this is why I love gear and technique discussions. I am a big fan of Tenacious Tape, but right-angle tape patch corners are a no-no. I have grommet kit punches in various sizes. It never occurred to me to punch out circular patches. Thanks for that suggestion.

And thanks for the heat-reflective suggestion; sometimes I can’t see the forest for the trees. I buried that little Yuedge on the tent & tarp shelf, and never really gave it further thought beyond “Wish I’d bought the bigger one to start with”

I’ll bring the 9x9 Yuedge next time I use the Tundra Tarp and see if/where I need to add quick attachments to pair with the Tundra Tarp webbing loops, for use as a fire’s edge or side wind block auxiliary tarp.

I don’t see either Yuedge version currently available, but there are plenty of small silver reflective tarps priced cheaply enough to be years of patched pinhole semi-sacrificial.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B071VDVR2W/re ... th=1&psc=1


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PostPosted: December 6th, 2022, 4:18 pm 
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Joined: August 16th, 2011, 8:02 pm
Posts: 347
Location: Edmonton area
Mike, I will dig out some snaps and post them correctly if I can figure out how to do it.

I did a lot of modding on both my older (green) Chinook Guide tarp, and on the new (blue/silver) one, that includes several pole saddles in various places, and many tie outs of various descriptions all around.

But in addition to that, I made a triangular side piece which attaches with industrial Velcro, and can be easily moved from one side to the other, for times when the wind changes during the evening.

If a wind shift starts to bring smoke into the tarp living room area, complete with Helinoxesque chairs and table, the quick addition of the side wall sorts that out. I even put a clear plastic window in it. It takes literally less than a minute to either attach, or move from one side to the other. Weighs maybe a few ounces, as in 5 or 6, and packs down to tennis ball size and resides in my tarp bag. You may want to consider some form of quick deploy, reversable side, side wall for your set up?? Good luck.

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