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 Post subject: old-time recipes
PostPosted: March 1st, 2006, 7:09 am 
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Location: Burlington, Ontario Canada
I am putting together a package for Scouts on "traditional canoe tripping" with some emphasis on methods from the early 1900s. I would be grateful for some authentic cooking pointers, especially for beans and salt pork. If I ask for salt pork these days, will I get something like people used then?

Other parts will include packing with tumplines etc, clothing, and shelter, with storytelling from Grey Owl, J. Rowlands, Marion Ferrier and Calvin Rutstrum.

Don


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PostPosted: March 1st, 2006, 8:15 am 
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Location: Scarbados, Ontario Canada
An interesting project!

One thing that I came across when reading old reports is "Erbswurst" or translated "Sausage made from Peas". It's dried pea soup, shaped into sausage form. Image

I hadn't seen it since the 50's but it still is being sold somewhere.... The manufacturer is
Bestfoods Markenartikel GmbH, 74074 Heilbronn.

One word of caution if you consider smoked meat products: most stuff what's displayed in the supermarkets is "hot-smoked" and will not last without refrigeration.


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PostPosted: March 1st, 2006, 9:12 am 
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Location: sutton, ontario
Hi Don

I recommend Camp Cookery by Horace Kephart. It's a very entertainling look at how camp cooking was done in the old days. It's available at either Chapters or Lee Valley

here is a link to the Lee Valley site:

http://www.leevalley.com/gifts/page.asp ... 53221&ap=2

Good Luck and let us know how your trip goes.

cheers
lynda


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PostPosted: March 1st, 2006, 10:28 am 
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Many thanks.
Erhard, I remember a spot in Grey Owl's "Tales of an Empty Cabin" where he mentions "Urbswurst". I had no idea it wasn't meat!

Don


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PostPosted: March 1st, 2006, 5:53 pm 
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Location: Scarbados, Ontario Canada
I think I saw it also with the Hubbard expeditions journals. It was also used in the Klondike days.

That stuff tastes actually quite good. You soak a chunk of that "wurst" till it can be squished into a mush and then stir it into boiling water. Maybe add some salami or similar, and boil. Best with a hunk of bread or maybe bannock - it's a meal!


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PostPosted: March 1st, 2006, 5:59 pm 
lyndak wrote:
Hi Don

I recommend Camp Cookery by Horace Kephart. It's a very entertainling look at how camp cooking was done in the old days. It's available at either Chapters or Lee Valley

here is a link to the Lee Valley site:

http://www.leevalley.com/gifts/page.asp ... 53221&ap=2

Good Luck and let us know how your trip goes.

cheers
lynda


DITTO!


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PostPosted: March 5th, 2006, 3:14 pm 
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Location: Missouri, U.S.A
On one of my backpacking trips on the Appalachian Trail in North Carolina, I shared one of the trail shelters one evening with 3 local, hillbillyish guys. One of them fried up some "salt pork" in a pan and gave me some. If I remember right, it was kind of like bacon only much saltier. Almost too salty to eat. Maybe he should have parboiled it first. Kephart mentions parboiling salt pork and bacon prior to pan frying in one of his books - i have "Camping and Woodcraft".

I've never tried to purchase it; I would think a small butcher shop might be the best place to look.


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PostPosted: March 5th, 2006, 3:23 pm 
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Erhard wrote:
One word of caution if you consider smoked meat products: most stuff what's displayed in the supermarkets is "hot-smoked" and will not last without refrigeration.


If you can make a weekend trip up to St. Jacobs, the mennonites at the market there still sell traditionally smoked meats and sausages. It is a ritual that we go up for the maple syrup festival and get enough Summer Sausage to last the season. Just be sure you getting the real stuff and not stuff sold by fakes trying to turn a quick buck.


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PostPosted: March 5th, 2006, 4:45 pm 
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Location: Burlington, Ontario Canada
I have obtained Kephart's Camp Cookery. It is fascinating. I am looking for a source of the Erbswurst. Scouts would think it a nifty thing to try.

I found a document called "The Canoe" by Robert Pinkerton, copyright 1914. It can be seen at www.wcha.org/tidbits/pinkerton. He gives interesting views on most aspects of canoe tripping.

Don


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PostPosted: March 5th, 2006, 5:13 pm 
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Location: Kanata, Ontario Canada
Quote:
One of them fried up some "salt pork" in a pan and gave me some. If I remember right, it was kind of like bacon only much saltier. Almost too salty to eat. Maybe he should have parboiled it first.

is this similar to salt back or bean pork? If so it's what the east coasters use to fry fish....in Canada try Sobeys
I have a question, there's an outlet amll up near Barrie on HYW400 and it has a booth with Menonite smoked meats and sausages....I assumed this was "authentic" bought some but it never made it to tripping season....so how do you tell "fakes"?


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PostPosted: March 5th, 2006, 5:35 pm 
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Quote:
I have a question, there's an outlet amll up near Barrie on HYW400 and it has a booth with Menonite smoked meats and sausages....I assumed this was "authentic" bought some but it never made it to tripping season....so how do you tell "fakes"?


Generally if its sold off the back of a black buggy by a couple of very shy kids who speak clear english with a hint of an accent, while their father who has a beard but no moustache watches warily, there is a good chance you are getting the good stuff. Even in St. Jacobs though there are now folks who sell at the market dressed in Mennonite garb, but not of the faith. Thats why we go to the maple sugar festival in Elora, and buy the bagged stuff (never commercilly wrapped) from the same shop every year.


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PostPosted: March 5th, 2006, 9:58 pm 
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Location: Toronto, Ontario Canada
A great place to buy sausage is the "27 Country Market" on Hwy. 27 in Cookstown. Probably the 7th Wonder of the Smoked Meat World.
Image
A picture of our sausage tree, which we used to dry out some sausages that got a little damp in the cold bag which was no longer cold. :doh:

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PostPosted: March 10th, 2006, 10:10 am 
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Location: Barrie, Ontario Canada
If it's any interest to you, I have preserved both bacon (slab) and cheese (cheddar) for tripping with vinegar.

It affects the taste a little, but all of the food will get eaten.

I used malt vinegar, soaked the blocks over night, patted them dry, wrapped them in cheesecloth, and stored them in a canvas bag.

Then went on a 2-week trip. This was in the fall, so we didn't have any 90-degree days, but we had a range of temps and both foods held up just fine.


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PostPosted: March 10th, 2006, 1:32 pm 
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Location: Jämtland, Sweden
I'll toss in a tradtional Swedish outdoor dish: "kolbullar".

100g smoked cured pork or slab bacon
3.5-4 dl flour
4 dl water

* Dice pork
* Mix flour and water into a thick batter
* Fry the pork in a skillet until done.
* Add he batter and fry on high heat on both sides until done.

/Par


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PostPosted: March 10th, 2006, 7:47 pm 
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Location: Brampton, Ontario Canada
Dave Hadfield,
The bacon slab I can not atest to.I have never tried to take on a trip. The cheddar cheese, I have and I do not soak in vinegar. I take in old cheddar and/or X-old cheddar. Except for being a little oily after a week or so I have not had a problem.
Bill

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