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PostPosted: March 10th, 2006, 8:31 pm 
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Joined: August 19th, 2001, 7:00 pm
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Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario Canada
Not and old time recipe, but while we are on the topic of bacon:

You can pre-cook it at home and dry it in the oven. The cooking seems to render the fat into a stable condition. I have not taken it on a trip, but I tested it by placing it in a mason jar for about a year. It never turned moldy. Looked normal and smelled normal. I did not eat it, but for a few weeks on a trip I bet its fine.

I have never used it on a trip because its greasy and has bear smell management issues, and I prefer less aromatic dried meats for tripping.


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PostPosted: March 11th, 2006, 2:30 am 
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Joined: January 25th, 2002, 7:00 pm
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Location: Revelstoke, British Columbia canada
See if you can round up a copy of the old merit badge series on cooking for the Boy Scouts of America
Cooking one happems to be wrote by Kephart Some recipes
Some of these little booklets are quite interesting .Canoeing and others are a great look at was expected from scouts way back when
They come up on Ebay evry once in awhile
That erbwurst was developed in the Fist War as iron rations for the German Army


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PostPosted: March 11th, 2006, 6:46 am 
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Joined: June 20th, 2001, 7:00 pm
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Location: Scarbados, Ontario Canada
dboles wrote:
...
That erbwurst was developed in the Fist War as iron rations for the German Army

Hey, I am the chief-googler on Erbswurst! :wink:
Naw, it's about 50 years older, but you are right, it was used extensively by the German armies. And by generations of outdoor folks.
Here is the (translated) story of its history.


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PostPosted: March 14th, 2006, 1:17 pm 
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Joined: May 4th, 2004, 10:16 am
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Location: McLean, Virginia
If you camp on a sand beach, here is a great recipe. We used to soak the navy beans for several hours, per package. After dinner we would build a small bonfire on a likely section of dry sand. After if died down, we would scoop the hot sand to the side and build another bonfire, repeat. In the meantime, line a bean pot or dutch oven with a tight fitting lid with salt pork slabs. Drain beans and put in pot with a can of molasses and two cups of brown sugar. Add spices to taste. Stir beans but keep the pork against the sides. Put a sheet of aluminum foil over the beans, cap with the lid, and wire it shut. (We would bring a piece of foil and wire for this purpose.) Bury it in the hot sand and let it cook overnight. Carry it in the pack or wannigan the next morning. Heat it over the fire and serve for the next day's lunch or dinner. We were feeding 10. Serve with bannock or cornbread.


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PostPosted: March 14th, 2006, 2:31 pm 
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Joined: January 30th, 2005, 12:21 pm
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Location: Brantford
I love reading this thread... doing things the old-time way is so interesting.


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PostPosted: March 14th, 2006, 5:10 pm 
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Joined: March 10th, 2006, 5:07 pm
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Location: WPG
Here are a few things you could of the try. I’ve never used a recipe, but here are some approximate guidelines. P.S. I haven't read the rest of the thread so some of this might be a repetition.

1. Bannock,
Get a big pot, put in some flour, add a teaspoon of baking soda per 2 or 3 cups of flour (optional), raisins (optional), pinch of salt per 2 or 3 cups. Mix ingredients. Make a hole in the middle of flour, add water, kneed a bit, add water, kneed a bit, add water, etc. The trick is not to put to much water. End product should be smooth and not sticky if possible. Make cakes that are like 4 inches in diameter and half an inch thick, cook in a pan over medium heat. Or what the kids would like even more is to roll their peice of dough into a long stick 1/2 an inch thick and spiral it around the tip of stick and each cooks his piece. They get to prepare their stick too! Spread butter or jam for taste (will make it edible even if you screw up)

2.Pea soup,
Get dry peas at the store in the bulk foods section. Get some salt pork (not to much it's extremely salty). 2 ingredients that it. Ok pepper if you want to get fancy.
Put the peas in a big pot add water so you have the water covering the peas by about an inch, cook on a tripod over medium heat to a low boil. Stir occasionally, try not to burn any, if you do avoid scraping the bottom.

Now the salt pork. The trick is to desalt the pork (do this while the peas are cooking)! Cut it in 1/4 inch thick 1or 2 inch long peices. Put them in a bucket with water. Change water after 5 minutes, in the water, rub the peices to get more salt out and change the water again. The more you repeat this step the more salt you get out of it. Once that is done, drain the water and add pork to the soup. Add water if needed. This takes a while to cook. The longer it cooks the better it is. You can do this with lie corn instead of peas but it's harder to make.

Keep in mind that they might not like it so have some other stuff to go with it. If it is absolutely terrible, which is very possible until you get the recipe down, play it up as if eating it was a sign of bravoury or something.

You can cook just the pork in a skillet but it really brings out the salt. Some like 'em crunchy some like 'em chewy.

3. Roast meat. Buy a few chunks of beef or bison (the kind for roasts will do). Four inch diameter will do. Get a long piece of green wood (3/4inch thick) shave the bark, stick the meat on the stick, slide it to the middle of the stick, figure out a way to fix the stick horizontal across the fire, something that can be moved around easily. Before you start cooking, sprinkle a good dose of salt and pepper on it. Roast the meat (turn stick every so often) in a hot spot away from flame if possible. Cook like desired. If you’re impatient, cut pieces that are cooked on the outside and leave the middle part to cook some more.

Have fun,
Renaud


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 Post subject: Re: old-time recipes
PostPosted: October 28th, 2021, 5:57 pm 
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Location: Ottawa
Old thread, but never got to a good salt pork & beans recipe...

Here’s the classic Camp Cookery by Horace Kephart,

https://archive.org/details/campcookery ... 3/mode/2up


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 Post subject: Re: old-time recipes
PostPosted: October 29th, 2021, 4:30 pm 
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Thanks for the link - just realized you can download the pdf - this is great!


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 Post subject: Re: old-time recipes
PostPosted: November 20th, 2021, 1:44 pm 
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Posts: 70
Location: Ottawa
Classic Salt Pork & Beans Recipe

-1 Lbs Navy Beans
-1/2 Lbs Salt Pork, Cubed
-1 Onion, Diced
-1/4 Cup Brown Sugar
-1/4 Cup Cooking Molasses
-5 Cups Water

Soak beans overnight in water. Soak cubed salt pork overnight in water, then rinse a couple times to reduce salt content. Combine all ingredients in slow cooker, Dutch oven or pot. Simmer or bake for 8 hours. Serves 4-6.


Last edited by Airbag on November 21st, 2021, 12:38 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: old-time recipes
PostPosted: November 21st, 2021, 1:35 am 
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Joined: October 11th, 2021, 4:19 pm
Posts: 61
Sourdough fry-bread to dip in your beans? Sourdough pancakes?
Culture dries nicely as a dough-ball, and can be reactivated in flour and water as needed (a few days in advance).


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 Post subject: Re: old-time recipes
PostPosted: December 15th, 2021, 12:18 pm 
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Joined: August 16th, 2011, 8:02 pm
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Location: Edmonton area
D Burgess, to address you question about modern salt pork, I expect that it is a very reasonable facsimile of what was available in the early days; it is Very salty, and prep time for whatever dish you would like to add it to should include some time soaking in water to remove much of that salt. Overnight works well, but even an hour of soaking makes a bit difference.

It's available in most large chain supermarkets in Canada, as it is still a common ingredient in several maritime dishes. It comes in smallish packages which weigh probably about a pound. It is quite fatty, but that's the point with pork.

Another old timey foodstuff that you may want to consider for inclusion into your literary effort is hard tack, aka sea biscuits, and other names. Certainly period authentic, it can also be found in almost every large Canadian supermarket. It too requires serious soak time prior to being edible, as without such, it can literally break teeth.

Good luck with your old school bush food cookbook! Great idea.
Cheers.

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 Post subject: Re: old-time recipes
PostPosted: December 15th, 2021, 7:01 pm 
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Joined: August 11th, 2002, 7:00 pm
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Location: Sunny Wasaga Beach
It is good that you are trying to help DB but I have not seen him on here for a long time.

Being a fellow Newfie, he would be quite familiar with the salt pork that was sold decades ago. It was quite popular not just in the Maritimes but in NL as well.

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 Post subject: Re: old-time recipes
PostPosted: December 15th, 2021, 9:03 pm 
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Location: Edmonton area
Oh my, (red face), I neglected to look closely enough at the dates. Thanks Wotty, cheers.

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