It is currently January 21st, 2020, 12:58 pm

All times are UTC - 5 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 11 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Snowshoe size
PostPosted: December 10th, 2011, 10:04 pm 
Offline

Joined: July 5th, 2004, 12:55 am
Posts: 466
Would there be much difference walking between 9 x 30 and 10 x 34 snowshoes. For what it's worth I'm about 195 pounds all told. I use them recreationally, no heavy packs and mainly flat ground.
Thanks


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Snowshoe size
PostPosted: December 11th, 2011, 7:52 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: June 23rd, 2006, 4:25 pm
Posts: 3023
Location: Milton
Depends on snow depth, well used trail already packed the smaller ones would be fine.
But with a day pack deep snow I would go with the larger ones.
You are the same weight as me and with a day pack plus "some" cameras gear you will wish you had more "float"
I have a pair of the 9 x 30 which is no problem with packing down the trail for my dog and no pack, but we rarely get real snow in Milton.
I picked up a larger pair of traditional woods shoes for more float in deeper snow and my pack.
Jeff

_________________
Choosing to save a river is more often an act of passion than of careful calculation. You make the choice because the river has touched your life in an intimate and irreversible way, because you are unwilling to accept its loss. — (David Bolling, Ho


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Snowshoe size
PostPosted: December 11th, 2011, 9:14 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: October 11th, 2007, 4:39 pm
Posts: 677
Location: Red Lake
Also depends on what region you're in. Up here in the Boreal with steady -20 conditions the air is dry and the snow likewise. I strap on my 16 x 48 Huron's and still sink down a fair bit.....for me, bigger is much better. Just got a pair of 12 x 60 Ojibwa's that should prove better for lake crossings and open areas, then it's the 16 x 30 Bearpaws around camp or in the bush....Go big!

_________________
http://www.redlakeoutfitters.com - WCPP's Premier Outfitter
http://www.wintertrekking.com - The Winter Trekker's Online Community
Check out my YouTube Channel - Search for username "Red Lake Outfitters"


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Snowshoe size
PostPosted: December 11th, 2011, 10:16 am 
Offline

Joined: February 12th, 2008, 6:01 pm
Posts: 438
Location: North Bay, Ontario
What I have noticed is that, off trail, it is not very much more difficult to walk in bigger shoes than smaller ones. Therefore, other things being equal, I tend to use the bigger ones because they float better.

Kinguq.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Snowshoe size
PostPosted: December 11th, 2011, 10:48 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: June 20th, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 1777
Location: London, Ontario CANADA
Choose Both! one small and one Large!

What you will find is both shoes will do you in different scenario's. You can't predict the snow levels, if its packed or fluffly etc...

Large to float better and to break your own trails.

Smaller for camp and packed down area's where existing trails are established.

Besides, once your hooked you will want to share that experience so having a secondary pair will allow you to go with someone who may want to try it!

If your still not certain , check out your nearest outdoor store, some will rent you shoes, if you plea bargain enough, you may be able to use the cost of the rental on the shoes you choose to purchase. You might not! but heck , its worth trying.

Cheers

_________________

[color=green]For love of the wilderness, A journey begins...[/color] [color=brown][b][Nature's Calling...] So get OFF(!) THAT(!!) THUNDERBOX !!![/b][/color]




Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Snowshoe size
PostPosted: January 7th, 2012, 11:22 pm 
Offline

Joined: February 8th, 2005, 10:34 pm
Posts: 726
It's very simple. Regardless of shape and size and material, go big or go home.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Snowshoe size
PostPosted: January 8th, 2012, 9:30 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: December 19th, 2006, 8:47 pm
Posts: 8940
Location: Rattlesnake Pond ME
lost_patrol wrote:
It's very simple. Regardless of shape and size and material, go big or go home.



:rofl:

Not in my lovely icy mountainous area!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Snowshoe size
PostPosted: January 8th, 2012, 4:02 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: August 27th, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 2514
Location: Geraldton, Ontario Can
If you're breaking trail, go big. If you're walking on established trails, size doesn't really matter.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Snowshoe size
PostPosted: January 8th, 2012, 9:05 pm 
Offline

Joined: July 5th, 2004, 12:55 am
Posts: 466
Interestingly I ended up with 2 pairs. I brought back a no name pair of 9x30 and they measured quite a bit smaller than a second pair ( tubbs 9x30 also) that were 2nd hand. The Tubs seem way sturdier. I'd like to say you get what you pay for... But the Tubbs were less and unused :-)
The surface area of the Tubbs are said to be 241 sq inches... They sure look a lot bigger than the no names!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Snowshoe size
PostPosted: January 8th, 2012, 11:04 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: August 19th, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 1879
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario Canada
Go large. I am only 150 lb's and very short at 5"4", (with short stride) and I find that my 10x34 synthetics are usually too small in anything but shallow or icy packed snow. I have no problem at all maneuvering over, around and through blowdown, and over ice crags with the 10x34's. They spin on a dime when you learn the tradtional kick step turn. Other than for UL packing when you are packing snowshoes on a pack and hiking or skiing in with them on your back, I recommend to all winter people where you will find deep snow, to go with the biggest you can find.

If you are on icy pack and shallow snow, then smaller is fine. But the reverse is not true when you are in deep fluffy. And when you are on the dreaded lake slush....well you should be on 16x48 tradtionals at a minimum! The biggest synthetics still have less flotation than big honking tradtionals. The extreme up-turned toe on some modern synthetics also reduces float.

I think own about 6 pairs of snowshoes (I actually forget how many pairs I own! :lol: ), and each is good in different conditions.

I recommend you look at snowshoes as a lifelong collection to build of several pairs. Take your time and aquire as resources permit. Good ones can last a lifetime, and make great lenders to a buddy, and passing on as gifts to youngsters who have no money but who want to be out in winter.

_________________
My YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/Wintertrekker


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Snowshoe size
PostPosted: January 8th, 2012, 11:46 pm 
Offline

Joined: July 5th, 2004, 12:55 am
Posts: 466
I've had traditional for, lo, 40+ years and they're still good. I find them quiet wiyh a nice feel. A fewyears ago I bought MSR Denalis and went up a mountain with them; I wss impressed! The one new pair (now 2) was so my SO would be more secure on hills.
Plus my leather snowshoe boots are dying and I can't find anyone to resole them. The modern snowshoes work with hiking boots well. Until I sort out the boots for traditionals...


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 11 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 5 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot] and 9 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group