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 Post subject: last wood ski query
PostPosted: January 9th, 2012, 4:40 pm 
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Joined: July 5th, 2004, 12:55 am
Posts: 466
On my track skis I put a base wax on, next the kick zone grip wax, then glide wax on what is not covered by grip wax.. On wood skis the info I have is to apply glide wax over the entire ski then kick wax over that in the kick zone.
Correct?
Thxs Al


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 Post subject: Re: last wood ski query
PostPosted: January 9th, 2012, 5:03 pm 
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Joined: June 22nd, 2004, 4:45 pm
Posts: 1215
Location: Canmore AB
Al;
I know you've done the pine tar thing so all you really need is kick wax. In most conditions wood skis glide well on their own. In very wet spring snow a glide wax may help. Wood skis have very little camber and no designated wax pocket so wax from the heel forward until you feel you've gone too far forward.
Btw on track skis with a P-tex base I rarely use a base wax. I will use it in abrasive conditions, for a long ski, or loppets. Base wax is a pita to apply correctly and hard to remove.I'd rather heat in cold wax as my base then apply the appropriate wax du jour. Much easier IMO when your temps fluctuate.
Hugh

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 Post subject: Re: last wood ski query
PostPosted: January 11th, 2012, 2:46 am 
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Joined: July 5th, 2004, 12:55 am
Posts: 466
I looked for a cold glide wax and found many with fluorocarbons. As this wax is carried in liquid form...Is the carrying agent a solvent and if so would that remove the pine tar?
Thxs Al


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 Post subject: Re: last wood ski query
PostPosted: January 11th, 2012, 7:15 am 
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Joined: August 19th, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 1879
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario Canada
Hi Alex1,

When it comes to waxing, it becomes a very individual thing. The type of ski, the person's weight, the type of snow, the type of trail, etc all play a role in a person's opinion about how to wax. For example, I will disagree with some of the details in what my friend Hugh recommended in the previous post, but that's just for me. It may work fine for him and his gear. There are many variables.

I suggest you do some reading, and practice, and don't rely too much on advice from canoeing discussion forums on ski waxing! :D When I was first starting out, (before the Internet), I obtained a waxing book produced by Swix. I found it excellent and comprehensive. Swix has a great website with waxing 101 and videos (although its been a couple years since I checked it, so it may have changed). You don't have to go with Swix products, but they seem to be the leader amongst companies in educational materials, at least in the English language anyways. I think if you study these educational websites on fundamental waxing priciples, you will find what you need.

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 Post subject: Re: last wood ski query
PostPosted: January 11th, 2012, 10:58 am 
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Joined: September 29th, 2005, 5:57 pm
Posts: 601
Hi Alex1 -

If memory serves (and it does so less well each year), back in the wood ski days specialized "glide waxes" were mostly just a glint in Mr. Swix's eye.

I wouldn't bother with any glide wax. I'd suggest a coat of cold grip wax, green or polar, over the full length of the ski. Then the grip wax of the day in your wax pocket. It would be useful to use the old paper test to see where your grip zone is. You're unlikely to find a lot of camber in old wood skiis, but depending on their model, length, and your weight, it would be useful information. Then ski. Wood bases have very good wax holding properties, so I think it unlikely you would need any specialized "base binder" under your grip wax.

One hint - if you do decide to go with a glide wax, don't apply it to the section you want to use grip wax on. Grip wax doesn't adhere well to glide wax.

Have fun.

-jmc


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 Post subject: Re: last wood ski query
PostPosted: January 11th, 2012, 3:32 pm 
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Joined: July 5th, 2004, 12:55 am
Posts: 466
I checked swix and they don't have a lot on wood skis. I was also on a site that specialized on wood skis and they said to apply glide wax to the entire ski and then apply grip to the kick pocket over that.
I'm lost.
The skis I'm rehabbing are 210cm , I'm about 190lbs and there isn' much of a pocket. I gather that is normal with old wood skis.
I don't expect to do anything other than enjoy them. Curious as to what they'll feel like. I'm far from a perfectionist but hope to do it sorta kinda almost right :-)


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 Post subject: Re: last wood ski query
PostPosted: January 11th, 2012, 4:33 pm 
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Joined: September 29th, 2005, 5:57 pm
Posts: 601
Here's a link to a site of a guy that builds them:
http://www.crosscountryskier.com/featur ... _2003.html
Note, at the end, you would use hard was or klister for kick. The way it's written almost makes it sound like you always add klister.
-jmc


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 Post subject: Re: last wood ski query
PostPosted: January 11th, 2012, 5:13 pm 
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Joined: June 20th, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 7513
Location: Scarbados, Ontario Canada
Digging deep down in the memory chest:

Put klister on only if you need it. Klister is messy and once you've got powdery snow to ski again, you must remove the klister and that involves elbow grease and possibly solvents.

When do you need klister: obviously only when the waxes don't give you grip anymore. For example: iced-over tracks, bare ice on blown lakes and hillsides, snow that has turned to slush from rain or from temperatures above zeroC.

As to wooden- vs plastic-based skis (shield country settings in Ontario): on back country trips or at track skiing by myself I preferred wood because it adds to safety: it slows you down a bit on the hills and is more forgiving if you don't get the wax right. On the other hand, when skiing with a group on tracks I preferred plastic: it has less friction and thus you don't have to work so hard to keep up with the group.

FYI: I was with the Canadian Ski Patrol, Nordic division, in the Kawarthas for number of years and thus learned a few lessons, plus we as a family skied to the cottage every winter weekend as the summer access wasn't plowed....

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 Post subject: Re: last wood ski query
PostPosted: January 13th, 2012, 10:02 pm 
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Joined: October 2nd, 2007, 11:04 am
Posts: 83
Location: PA, USA
Definitely do the paper test to check for whatever wax pocket you may have and only apply your kick wax there. You can dispense with glide wax for now.
It will take some experimentation before you find a good practice for your skis, technique and weight.
avoid klister at all costs, especially if you're camping. consider kicker skins instead :>


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