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PostPosted: June 9th, 2012, 3:49 pm 
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I posted this on another board but figured I would post it here as well (and yes...I'm thinking about winter camping already :).

What do you guys use for a ground cover inside your hot tent (aside from Spruce boughs)? I have a few of the blue cheapo tarps I could use but I would imagine they are super slippery.

Anyone have any suggestions as to what they find works best?

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PostPosted: June 9th, 2012, 4:57 pm 
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I had good luck with burlap. It has a nice grippy weave so it stays put on the pack, and you won't slip on it. I used it in front of the door and stove only, where I really needed it. Boughs everywhere else.


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PostPosted: June 10th, 2012, 1:40 pm 
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home workhop flooring. Its actually minicell and grips feet well enough. Have a runner of truck bed liner in front of the stove.

Our winter camping is in campgrounds where there are pine trees with boughs far up. And some red spruce. Too prickly for good sleeping. Also cutting is frowned on..ironic since its logged. Predominately hardwoods at camping level areas..

Burlap must be lighter though and a good thought for non sleeping areas. Minicell is a great insulator but the puzzle pieces stack and take room.


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PostPosted: June 14th, 2012, 8:44 am 
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Next time you see a moving truck in the neighborhood, go ask the movers if you can buy any packing blankets, they are amazing for ground cover in a hot tent. We usually put down poly tarps first, then blankets on top. During -45C blizzards on the open tundra, it's still t-shirt weather in the tent.


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PostPosted: June 16th, 2012, 6:12 am 
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If base camping close to the car those kids puzzle play mats of foam are great.
I picked up enough to do a 16 x 16 area for 10 bucks last year at a garage sale.
In the back woods balsam boughs.
Also you can get thin sheets of Ethel foam (hard wood underpadding) from a building supply and make an over sized protection for your sleeping pad if you have a good one.
Jeff

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PostPosted: June 17th, 2012, 4:32 pm 
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Thanks for the ideas guys...I actually have a moving blanket so perhaps I'll give that a try first and see how I fare with it.

Thanks again!

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PostPosted: June 18th, 2012, 6:19 pm 
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I can't usually use boughs where I camp, sometimes they are not available, sometimes that type of usage is not appropriate. So, I rely on tarps. Cheap poly tarps suck, but they do the job. Too slippery and too noisy, but they work, sort of. My MEC guide's tarp is better. So are the army surplus half shelters that I use as tanks for the sleds.

I've heard of some using tyvek house wrap. I like the burlap idea, might have to keep my eye out for some.

Cheers,
Bryan

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PostPosted: June 18th, 2012, 7:14 pm 
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Quote:
I've heard of some using tyvek house wrap


I use this as an all purpose groundsheet...but I don't do winter camping.

I would think it would work, not slippery and it is lighter and folds/rolls more compact than poly tarps. Doesn't have much of an R factor!

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PostPosted: June 19th, 2012, 8:08 am 
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Has anyone tried the Facto interlocking foam mats? They come in size 2'x2'x1/2" thick, a package of 6 weighs about 4 pounds, cost $19.99. water resistant,easy to clean, one year warranty. I tried them on my gravel driveway, walked on them in bare feet, couldn't feel the the gravel through them, tried scuffing them, they have a good lock, didn't seperate . Maybe a little bulky for long hauling but ideal for the Algonquin group. They would make a great pad under your mattress for the winter campers. I got mine at Rona building supplies. Good hunting. Al

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PostPosted: September 17th, 2012, 9:58 pm 
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For non winter use, I'm tempted to try those interlocking mats but currently use heavy trucker grade vinyl (might be 16 or 18 oz so not lightweight). A Bay blanket goes over that.


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PostPosted: September 18th, 2012, 7:34 am 
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whippypaddle wrote:
For non winter use, I'm tempted to try those interlocking mats but currently use heavy trucker grade vinyl (might be 16 or 18 oz so not lightweight). A Bay blanket goes over that.


I have used the interlocking mats. However if you are pulling a pulk they are bulky and awkward. So we use them for the sleeping area as they add insulation and use a Walmart truck bedliner for walking areas.


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PostPosted: December 27th, 2012, 1:06 pm 
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Tyvek house wrap. After using plastic tarps (miserably slippery) and canvas tarps (too heavy), I settled on the tyvek years ago. I used that red TuckTape to join some sections and make the right size.

Doesn't slide and is water-resistant. Lightweight. I painted it initially with latex to improve it waterproofness, but most of the paint is gone, and it doesn't seem to have made much difference. Still works.

Dave


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PostPosted: January 20th, 2013, 10:24 pm 
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Has anyone used indoor/outdoor carpet? How about a surplus canvas half shelter that can also be used as a tank? I often winter camp in a hardwood forest or PP so no boughs.


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PostPosted: January 20th, 2013, 10:50 pm 
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Carpet is bulky and heavy. When you're hand-hauling a toboggan, all that seems to matter is weight. Same with the canvas tarp.

Also, it's common to leave some things, various bits of hardware, out on the toboggan, thus the canvas tank is better left on it. The sled/toboggan runners are of course blocked up off the snow on rounds of wood.

However I made a mistake in the previous post. I meant Typar, not Tyvek -- house wrap. That's what I've been using. I get them mixed up.

Depends on your rig of course, but the typar is lightweight, water-resistant, cheap, and doesn't slide around or make noise. A new roll is expensive, but if you hit up a construction site for 12 ft or so, you won't have to pay the foreman much.

Dave


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PostPosted: January 21st, 2013, 12:29 am 
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For those who are interested here's a link to a comparison of Typar® vs Tyvek®

http://www2.dupont.com/Tyvek_Weatheriza ... 20Talk.pdf

Note that it's put out by Dupont, the makers of Tyvek®

I don't winter camp but I use Typar® as a groundsheet under my Thermarest® or as a "picnic blanket" when camping in sand.

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