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PostPosted: April 1st, 2003, 11:30 am 
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Fishing tales, we all have them; “Really! It was this big”! Or, “Oh! I had it on… and it was huge”!

One blustery spring day in Algonquin Park we were fishing the bottom from shore. It was quite a steep granite drop-off and it was also very rocky. I set up, casted my line, and promptly hooked Mother Earth. I went back and forth pulling this way and that, but she didn’t want to give my line back. I set my rod down in disgust and sat back on the rocks and caught some rays. Eventually I went down the shoreline to get the canoe so I could try to free the line. As I started paddling back I heard the guys starting to yell and saw my buddy Steve scampering to the waters edge with my rod. The rod was bent in half and Steve’s eyes were as big as dinner plates! :o He fought the fish to shore, and there was a beautiful 5 lb lake trout on the other end. The fish must have picked up the bait and freed the weight, which was snagged in the rocks. I was lucky that Steve was on the ball, and the fish ended up wrapped in foil and stuffed with onions and butter. Man was he good!


Last edited by C_Mel on April 1st, 2003, 12:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: The one that got away!
PostPosted: April 1st, 2003, 12:07 pm 
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Joined: December 29th, 2002, 7:00 pm
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Location: Bancroft, Ontario Canada
Absolutely agree that cooking fish in foil is one of the best ways to have 'em. And this isn't just because it's outdoors in the fresh air - I've baked northern pike in foil over the coals in the wood stove and pan-fried another at the same time. For some reason, northern pike turn out great, baked and steamed with salt and butter wrapped in foil, while they are just so-so panfried. All of the lake trout I've had have been pan-fried, though, so I haven't had the chance to test that theory out with them.

Anyway, to the fish story... we were fishing Upper Fry's lake east of Parry Sound for northern pike again... it's a natural spot for northerns, weedy and marshy. We had caught several in the 4-8 pound class, and they were released. Eventually I hooked into a large one, but we had forgotten the landing net (no Precise Planner on board!). I managed to hoist him into the canoe, this fish must have been 15 -20 pounds. Wow... look at that... now those further north reading may scoff at such a tiny pike, but for Parry Sound, that ain't bad.

The pike lay there in the canoe for a moment, then began to thrash around like the crazy wild beast it naturally is... since it still had a sharp barbed Williams spoon in it's jaw I wasn't going to chance grabbing it. After several thumping jumps off the floor, over the side it went, and the Williams detached itself from the monster along the way.

That's the one that almost ended up wrapped in foil, as anyone that's eaten northerns will know, the largest pike are the best.

Rick


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PostPosted: April 1st, 2003, 12:07 pm 
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Joined: March 13th, 2003, 7:00 pm
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Location: Ottawa, Ontario Canada
Oh man! The one that got away? :o I'm afraid I have more get-away stories than actual pictures of the fish I caught, like this one...

On a hot August day, I'm alone in my 14 foot boat on a HUGE lake. I am waiting for friends to return from the store, so I dicided to throw my line in and circle in a quiet bay. I have the fish finder on and it's telling me I am in 150ft deep of water.

As I am circling in this bay, a thunderstorm is coming my way. No problem, as I always enjoy being in a steel boat in the middle of a t-storm! :lol: Anyways, I keep circling with my line in the water, with a deep-runner rapala at the end of it. Often when I drive the boat, I'll have the rod leaning against the side of the boat, with the butt-end and reel jammed between the seat and my leg. Just so I can grab it quickly when a fish bites. The fish finder shows no sign of life around the boat...until...

All I hear is the fish finder making one distinct 'BEEP', then my line started screaming! I had the drag on pretty stiff and the line just kept dishing out. This happend in a fraction of a second. I didn't even have time to grab hold of my rod. The line, rod, reel just flew out of the boat and straight down to the bottom of the lake.

My friends, to this day, still tell me I'm full of crap! But I'll swear this story is true on my grandmother's head...and I will take this true story to my grave!


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PostPosted: April 1st, 2003, 5:30 pm 
Sorry , Rick ,I really mean no offense here , I loved the story , but the big ones don't taste best , they breed best . I don't mean to slam anybody on my first post but catch and release of the bigguns is a little thing with me. Eat up those yummy 2-4 pounders!


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PostPosted: April 1st, 2003, 10:52 pm 
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Joined: April 6th, 2002, 7:00 pm
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Location: Lake 'Cooch
About 10 years ago, a few friends and I visited a quiet, east Kawartha lake and my brother and I were about to head back to where the other guys set up the site, as it was well past dusk.We argued a bit about who was gonna get the last live bait,he won so I kept on my old minnow.It was about 250 yards to the campsite so I just let my line go,and go.I was paddling stern and we were going over one of the deepest parts so I just said 'Heck,I'll let it all out....."After getting about 80 yards from shore my brother reels in and begins to paddle giving me time to catch up with my line a bit.I felt something small but wayyyy back there. I said I got one on and started reeling faster then it snagged.He curses ,we turn around and when I reel in the slack I realized it was moving.Real Big!! We were only fishing for bass but musky lived here too,and I was only using 8 pound test so I couldn't really fight it-just hold on! To condense this fishing tale, we had it on for over half an hour, it did surface 3 or 4 times just out of reach, then we could tell it was wrapped that was why it kept coming up like a log! We could not believe the size in this small lake! The second time it surfaced was right beside the canoe about 4 feet away.It had swallowed whatever I had on the line because I could see no hook with the flashlight.The dorsal fin and tail fin was just breaking the surface and had to be over a foot and a half between the two.This means the musky was around 6 feet or more! It's eye was bigger than a jumbo marble! Anyway after it came up close to the canoe later it was almost untangled and Splash!! it went for another dash and I lost her!We were stunned and all 4 of us just groaned and cursed.I reeled up a smallmouth bass about 2 pounds all slimy,barely moving! It also had a thick gash deep to its spine and scales missing on the sides.Evidance of it's jonah-like ending.For over a year after that I kept lining up parking curbs,area rugs,couches,plywood,skiis,fishing rods,freezers,anything that was comparible in length to this monster.A legend for the 4 of us for life.I personally quit going for musky after that realizing you don't get chances twice in life for certain things like fishing ,Eh Boys! Any musky smaller than this seems a waste to keep unless you're starving.I'm no trophy fisher,but I know how big this one was..... :o


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PostPosted: April 2nd, 2003, 9:17 am 
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Location: Bancroft, Ontario Canada
Guest (sorry, I don't know your name on this board), no offense taken at your suggestion, I welcome your comments on the matter.

Actually that large northern would've probably been released with all the others. I was saying that, generally, large pike are better eating, the reason being that in smaller fish, the "y-bones" running down the center of the fillet are too small to be picked out. Not a problem with the larger ones.

What you say is true, angling for large individuals only might cause some genetic elimination of faster-growing fish in the overall gene pool. I almost always catch-and-release these days, since there is a lot of angling pressure on fish in the more populated parts of Ontario. The species that are impacted the most are those that grow slowly and take a long time to reach reproductive age. A typical lake trout might take seven years to be capable of reproduction, or longer in a poorly productive lake where they're forced to eat invertebrates.

Northern pike, on the other hand, grow fast and reproduce early. They multiply fast enough to displace slower-growing fish, if angling pressure is there, and their feeding habits may also impact other sport fish such as musky. There are many examples of this, in the Kawartha lakes there is some evidence that northerns are beginning appear and may displace the musky population. Pike have appeared in Algonquin Park's Booth lake and vicinity, where historically there were only smallmouth bass and trout. There are other lakes where smallmouth bass have more or less disappeared and northerns are all that remains. If the fishing pressure continues to be high, northerns will have the edge where they co-exist with other sport fish.

Catching and eating fish is fine, as long as anglers realize what the effects will be. And if a large fish must be eaten, a large northern pike is probably one of the best choices, since they will probably be the most resistant to any negative effects.

Rick


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 Post subject: big-shouldered Bass...
PostPosted: April 2nd, 2003, 11:23 pm 
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Joined: April 6th, 2002, 7:00 pm
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Location: Lake 'Cooch
I know of a small lake where many of the largemouths have humpbacks like a spawning,male salmon.Never have experienced this anywhere else and it only seems to be the largemouth bass not smallies.Over the years(25+), I've watched this lake turn from completely largemouth to smallies,now largemouth are on the increase again in size and numbers.Have had to change tactics as well over time.Interesting.


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PostPosted: April 4th, 2003, 11:37 am 
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Joined: June 25th, 2002, 7:00 pm
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frozentripper wrote:
Guest (sorry, I don't know your name on this board), no offense taken at your suggestion, I welcome your comments on the matter.

Actually that large northern would've probably been released with all the others. I was saying that, generally, large pike are better eating, the reason being that in smaller fish, the "y-bones" running down the center of the fillet are too small to be picked out. Not a problem with the larger ones.


Rick


If you find that you are getting a lot of bones in your pike fillets, you can try filleting them in a different manner:

Instead of taking the conventional two fillets from the side, take three. The first fillet is taken from the back of the fish, between the "Y" bones. The next two are taken from the sides of the fish, below the "Y" bones. Using this method, it is possible to get three boneless fillets from a "slot sized" fish.

cdb


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 Post subject: "Y" bones
PostPosted: April 13th, 2003, 9:50 pm 
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Joined: April 13th, 2003, 9:17 pm
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Location: Sudbury
If you are worried about "Y" bones and if the pike is large enough you can also use a 5 step process. Takes a few minutes. Looks like a bit of waste but not really. You end up with 5 good boneless pieces of fish for supper. UM. UM. Good.


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PostPosted: April 14th, 2003, 10:07 am 
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Joined: April 12th, 2003, 1:35 pm
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Location: Ottawa
Hey guys,

To put my two cents on the pike subject. I've fished Cache Bay on Lake Nippissing for most of my childhood. I'm not sure anybody is aware but its full of pike. There is a fairly large pike derby in the spring. I think its somewhat of a nursury for young pike most of the summer. In spring and fall the bigger ones come in the bay but most of the year 1 to 3 pounders are the norm. That being said.... I've eaten my share of pike. From my experience a 3 pound pike can feed a family of 4....even if Stevie Wonder were to fillet it....using the 3 piece technique or 5 peice technique! Anyways I enjoy eating pike and will usually bring one home instead of bass or walleye since they are less abundant.

As for fish stories. I have seen BIG pike just slowly cruise the shorline more than once...while on a paddleboat. I've tossed every lure I could think of...practically tapping their nose with the lures and they would never bite! I'd love to know what they were doing? Looking for a bigger meal? Anyways that's the first story that came to mind.

Good fishing and hope your spring feaver isnt as bad as mine!

Joe


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