It is currently October 20th, 2019, 6:32 am

All times are UTC - 5 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 26 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: January 6th, 2015, 9:11 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: December 29th, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 6137
Location: Bancroft, Ontario Canada
Thus I refute the Paleo diet... (see past threads and references in the report below).

Image

Quote:
Study finds that eating whole grains can help you live longer

By Samantha Bonar



Want another reason to eat a bowl of porridge? It may help you live longer.


Despite the popularity of such grain-eschewing diets as the Paleo and the gluten-free craze, a new study has found that people who eat a whole grain-rich diet live longer.

In fact, eating more whole grains may decrease people’s risk of death by up to 15%, particularly from heart disease, according to a large new long-term study from the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH).


Much of that benefit probably comes from the bran, the fibrous coating that processing removes from whole wheat and brown rice. Bran intake alone was linked with up to 6% lower overall death risk and up to 20% lower cardiovascular disease-related risk.

The study appears online in JAMA Internal Medicine.


“This study further endorses the current dietary guidelines that promote whole grains as one of the major healthful foods for prevention of major chronic diseases,” said Qi Sun, assistant professor in the Department of Nutrition at HSPH and senior author of the study.


The findings “also provide promising evidence that suggests a diet enriched with whole grains may confer benefits toward extended life expectancy,” the researchers write in their report. (The Harvard School of Public Health recommends that people get one-quarter of their daily calories from whole grains; the federal government’s most recent Dietary Guidelines recommend consuming at least half of all grains as whole grains.)



Whole grains contain a range of beneficial nutrients, from fiber to magnesium, vitamin E and plant-based compounds called phytochemicals, that are stripped from refined white flour and white rice. These grains, such as whole wheat, brown rice, whole oats, barley, farro and others found in those mysterious Whole Foods bins help the body regulate blood sugar, fat and cholesterol; maintain blood vessel health; help prevent DNA damage; and reduce inflammation.

Although eating more whole grains has been previously linked with a lower risk of major chronic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, until now there had been limited evidence regarding whole grains’ association with mortality.

Harvard researchers and colleagues looked at data from more than 74,000 women from the Nurses’ Health Study and more than 43,000 men from the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study who filled out questionnaires about their diet every two or four years from the mid-1980s to 2010.

Adjusting for a variety of factors, such as age, smoking, body mass index, physical activity and overall diet excluding whole grains, the researchers compared the participants’ whole-grain intake with mortality data over an approximately 25-year period.

They found that whole grain intake was associated with up to 9% decreased risk of overall mortality and up to 15% decreased risk of cardiovascular disease-related mortality. For each serving of whole grains (measured as 28 grams per day), the overall death risk dropped by 5%, and by 9% for cardiovascular disease-related death.

However, eating whole grains doesn’t appear to affect the risk of dying from cancer. The researchers also didn’t find any decreased overall mortality risk from eating germ, another component of whole grains.

Replacing refined grains and red meats with whole grains is also likely to lower mortality risk, according to the study. Swapping just one serving of refined grains for whole grains reduced cardiovascular disease-related deaths by 8%; swapping out one serving of red meat for whole grains lowered that risk by a whopping 20%.

Tell that to your steak-loving Paleo friend while you eat your bowl of porridge.



http://www.latimes.com/food/dailydish/l ... story.html

_________________
><((((º>


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: January 6th, 2015, 10:39 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: December 19th, 2006, 8:47 pm
Posts: 8929
Location: Rattlesnake Pond ME
So if I eat only porridge from now on I can give back my family history of heart disease and cancer?
:rofl:
I got both the same month and it affected and will for another year my paddling or lack thereof


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: January 6th, 2015, 12:46 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: February 19th, 2004, 9:53 pm
Posts: 1451
Location: Atlanta
Porridge is processed. You have to eat your grains whole.

I've had exactly two paddling outings this year because of various system problems. I hope to get lucky in 2015.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: January 6th, 2015, 2:06 pm 
Offline
CCR Moderator & Assistant Administrator
User avatar

Joined: October 27th, 2006, 5:51 am
Posts: 2895
Location: Montreal
That's a twist. Lately I've read about phytic acid and starch as being bad.

Of course nowadays everything and anything is BAD so it's become a lot easier to figure out what not to eat, drink, do or breath. Even your thoughts are bad for you.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: January 6th, 2015, 5:32 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: August 11th, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 5530
Location: Sunny Wasaga Beach
Doctors have now established that saliva is carcinogenic, but only if swallowed in small quantities over a long period. :lol:

_________________

Old canoeists never die---they just smell that way.



Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: January 6th, 2015, 9:40 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: December 19th, 2006, 8:47 pm
Posts: 8929
Location: Rattlesnake Pond ME
:rofl: Hmm. I drool sometimes. I have cancer. Is that proof??


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: January 7th, 2015, 10:44 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: December 29th, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 6137
Location: Bancroft, Ontario Canada
Kim, I am sorry to read you have cancer and you have my wishes that your quality of life remains high, despite that. I hope that with the new medical discoveries being made, you'll be able to carry on with living with nature, being aware and being able to breathe freely in the outdoors.


As all our years increase towards some inevitable final number, being alive is still a win... best of care, best of health and best of luck.

_________________
><((((º>


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: January 7th, 2015, 11:25 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: December 19th, 2006, 8:47 pm
Posts: 8929
Location: Rattlesnake Pond ME
It was discovered as a result of my having to have Plavix post stent. Uncontrollable bleeding.

I have had three operations in as many months.

I believe I may never again trip as I have in the past but am planning a paddle trip this winter down South inbetween chemo.

If you are of a certain age, just do it and hang the cost. There may be no tomorrow. I have a bankful of good tripping memories.

If anything gets me back in shape for tripping it will be FreeStyle.. I am practicing paddling in the house. Without the water there is no resistance but when the water opens I will be ready to get out an hour a day so I can work back up to tripping stamina.

Some folks believe that there is no use for Freestyle on trips but it made my paddling so much more efficient as I did not work against myself. Every stroke really counts.

But I digress.. Exercise is a component of cancer care. I work out every day at the gym. I have encouragers who ask how many kms I did today and how I feel. I know some of you are reading this and thank you..Some of them are CCR ex attendees.

Its not all about medicine. Sometimes less is more and the care these days is more targeted.

I have been given the go ahead to canoe.. Blessedly I do not have a port. Unblessedly I don't have soft water!

These days you cannot distinguish a cancer patient sometimes from a non cancer patient. The person next to you in the gym could have it or not.

And all cancers are different. Some come out worse Some come out way better. It will change your life. I am thinking how I can incorporate canoe instruction into a cancer wellness program.

But we are way off the Paleo diet. I tend to blame additives more than anything else for the surge in cancer. If its got a list of chemicals before anything natural, I will not now eat it. Watch that grain.. It may have a lot of additives. Read the label to make sure it has not been treated.

I eat meat and eggs a lot. And they are all natural and local. And expensive. But worth it. How much is your life worth to you?

Ironic isn't it.. Therapy consists of dumping toxic things in my body. Its my duty to avoid adding to the toxic load.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: January 7th, 2015, 3:01 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: April 21st, 2004, 10:52 am
Posts: 1099
Location: Near Ottawa ON
Hey Kim, thanks for sharing that. I think about you a lot.

....hmmm, don't know if you'd find that last sentence comforting or concerning <laugh>


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: January 7th, 2015, 6:35 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: February 19th, 2004, 9:53 pm
Posts: 1451
Location: Atlanta
"Swapping just one serving of refined grains for whole grains reduced cardiovascular disease-related deaths by 8%; swapping out one serving of red meat for whole grains lowered that risk by a whopping 20%."

As stated, that makes no sense. It sounds like they are talking about individual subjects and individual servings, and they cannot be. Please clarify. If possible.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: January 7th, 2015, 7:07 pm 
Offline

Joined: December 9th, 2012, 9:57 am
Posts: 344
Reading labels is a little simpler nowadays, with most everything listed. It still feels like a grocery aisle chemistry quiz sometimes though. Keeping our diets simpler is still a challenge, when we're bombarded with multiethnic food fads at the same time as "don't eat this, don't eat that". I thought the sky was gonna fall when I read a screaming headline "the bacon & coffee combination will kill you!" I cut waaay back on bacon, but the caffeine hasn't been kicked yet. Trying to approximate a Mediterranean diet is a challenge while watching out for excessive food miles. Local meats & far off olive oil, local seasonal veg & far off quinoa...As LRC mentions, chemicals added in the form of process or treatment always has me concerned.
Best wishes YC(LRC). My positive thoughts are with you, positively pushing you to enjoy some of that southern Floridian sun, and put all this other stuff behind you...and ultimately paddle these northern waters again when they open up in...how many days till ice out??? Take care.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: January 7th, 2015, 7:36 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: December 19th, 2006, 8:47 pm
Posts: 8929
Location: Rattlesnake Pond ME
Ya know steroids in your food are not good for you. What do I get fed in chemo? Steroids. Aah.. Sometimes modern life makes no sense. Today with my steroid overload I wanted to bench press an insane load in the gym.

Cancer has made me an opinionated bitch and I expect to get booted from other online places. I don't really care anymore!

I have to remember that Cro Magnon man had a life expectancy of about half of where I am now.

Are we simply living too long?

How chicken nuggets are made. I am running for my prescribed Zofran. Beware.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kwEqi0zfJ4o


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: January 7th, 2015, 9:21 pm 
Offline

Joined: December 9th, 2012, 9:57 am
Posts: 344
Umm, I've always valued your opinions. I dunno nothin about the b word, but I am hating the booting thing. Living too long? Maybe, but it's all a crap shoot playing the odds. Speaking of crap, I'm afraid to watch the chicken nugget video. Last weekend I saw my vegetarian daughter putting some chicken nuggets into the microwave. "What're those? Aren't you vegetarian full time? Or is this your day off?" It turns out they were mock chicken nuggets. (Chicken Mocknuggets?) Anyway, I'm not sure I'd wanna know what went into those either.
Last fall we received our order of 6 whole chickens and two turkeys, butchered and frozen. They weren't exactly free range, but I've spent many many days on that farm, so I know they had an unharried and happy life, lots of room to do their fowl living in. I checked their feed. Not organic, but steroid free. I still don't love them enough not to eat them though. I'm a carnivore out of choice. I just wish I could afford to be so picky about everything I eat. Or maybe I'm just lazy and make the wrong budget choices sometimes.

Ps Oh shoot, I just couldn't stay away from the dang video. Mmmmm, meat putty.
Those chicken mocknuggets are starting to sound pretty good now.


Last edited by Odyssey on January 7th, 2015, 9:35 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: January 7th, 2015, 9:33 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: December 19th, 2006, 8:47 pm
Posts: 8929
Location: Rattlesnake Pond ME
I have neighbors who have chickens I fear for. she allows them free range. Not only is my dog stupid when the chickens arrive here free range but out of range but she has lost one to a coyote or a hawk..

The video is kind of disgusting.. if you watch I recommend muting the sound effects.

I saw something like it on How its Made on the History Channel and emailed the link to my daughter. Her eight year old son loves nuggets... ecch.. He is also the pasta kid. Picky. Then he cries when he cant have a #2 because he is constipated. :doh:


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: January 7th, 2015, 9:46 pm 
Offline

Joined: December 9th, 2012, 9:57 am
Posts: 344
This particular farm is that of our son's former in-laws. They built a coop near the house, so they wouldn't have to hike through northern winters 1/4 mile back to the barn. You know all about the winter thing, living where you do. I used to visit a lot, and found thawing frozen water lines the least fun chore to do. Maybe on par with mucking out the pig sty. Now that is beyond disgusting. The new coop is roomier and warmer than many motel rooms I've stayed in. Last time I visited the hens, they were contented and laying well. They live too far for me to benefit from that part of the equation. The turkey pen is also large and protected from bears, coyotes and wolves. We had to place a special order, requesting our two turkeys be smaller than emus.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 26 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC - 5 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group