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PostPosted: December 14th, 2004, 6:06 pm 
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Here is an idea that has been kicking around in my head for a boat hull layup:

It's a fairly recent semi out of the blue idea for me, but I'm sure some others must have tried it or at least have 2nd hand knowledge of this constuction technique. (Someday I hope to have enough shop space - and time - to try building some boats). Does anyone have experience with laminated wood veneer hulls? I've been thinking that with a blend of old and new techniques it might be possible to create a rather exquisite strong & light wood hull with bias laid vacuum bagged wood veneers.

Not sure what wood I would use for the intermediate layers. I've always had a particular fondness for maple - and the thought of someday paddling a featherweight laminated boat of my own design sheathed in curly maple puts a wide smile on my face. :D

This of course is someday way down the road after trying other experiments with hull designs and construction technique; Not particularly interested in having an expensive, badly built, poorly performing hull in gorgeous bird's eye. :roll:

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PostPosted: December 14th, 2004, 6:43 pm 
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Location: Mounds View, Minnesota US
Steve,

I have no experience with this method, thou I "think" it's referred to as "cold molding".

Some places to look of info are.

The WoodenBoat BB, probably the best place to look. Lots of experience there.

Also, ask at the WCHA BB, some there may know of old builders that used the method.

And for a look at a close method, check out Willits canoes at:
http://mcfarlandlake.wcha.org/
They are 2 layers that are clinched.

Dan


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PostPosted: December 14th, 2004, 6:52 pm 
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hi,
I have seen the type of building on this site. http://www.glen-l.com/ they offer plans and building instructions for this type of craft. In the canoe section there are pics of one of there canoes and it is done in maple. I had seen one done in Rosewood veneer in a back issue of Wooden boat. Very striking.

Larry


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PostPosted: December 14th, 2004, 7:13 pm 
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Location: Toronto, Ontario Canada
Image

Yup that's a fine looking canoe!

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PostPosted: December 14th, 2004, 9:03 pm 
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[quote="SteveBoal"]I've been thinking that with a blend of old and new techniques it might be possible to create a rather exquisite strong & light wood hull with bias laid vacuum bagged wood veneers.

Steve, that sounds like a plywood canoe with as you'd like it maple on the faces. Not sure about the maple on the faces, but plywood canoes have been built for years. Wooden Canoe Issue 103 (available on the web) had a cool article on an old Swedish company that built plywood canoes back in the 1940s. Their hulls were 17'2", with a 35.5" beam and weighed 57 pounds.

In addition, Haskell (an airplane manufacturer that built laminated airplane fuselages) in Ludington, Michigan built a few plywood canoes.

PK


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PostPosted: December 14th, 2004, 10:08 pm 
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Ya, plywood stitch and glue canoes & kayaks all the rage these days.
Ted Moores has a new book out dedicated to it "Kayaks You Can Build"?, Bear Mountain Boats.
They are quite light as well.
Not hooked on their "Chine".
The plywood is / can be a very high quality "Obukume" marine plywood.
Quite a beautiful wood.

Doug

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PostPosted: December 14th, 2004, 10:31 pm 
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Kayaks You Can Build -Ted Moores & Greg Rossel

http://www.bearmountainboats.com/news_20.htm

Christmas Present?

Doug

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PostPosted: December 14th, 2004, 11:07 pm 
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Doug wrote:
Ya, plywood stitch and glue canoes & kayaks all the rage these days.


Doug, Nope not stitch and glue... one piece molded plywood canoe hulls. Check this stuff out. Here is a followup article to the one I previously mentioned in Issue 103 of Wooden Canoe that gives a historical review of molded plywood canoes. This one is from Issue 105.

http://www.wcha.org/wcj/v24_n3

Here is a series of pics of the Haskell Canoe:

http://www.okicu.com/pages/canoe.html

PK


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PostPosted: December 14th, 2004, 11:43 pm 
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So rather than using plywood to build a boat, you build plywood in the shape of a boat.

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PostPosted: December 15th, 2004, 7:30 am 
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"one piece molded plywood canoe hulls" sounds tricky.

See more marketing of these type of plywood boats today.
http://www.pygmyboats.com/
http://www.clcboats.com/index.php

Doug

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PostPosted: December 15th, 2004, 11:04 am 
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Location: Swartz Creek, Michigan, USA
Moulded plywood veneer hulls have interested me since I picked up a 16-foot Canada Ply Craft Corp. Canoe about 4 years ago.
As Dan mentioned, Haskell offered a moulded veneer hull, which you can find more information on by following this link.
http://www.picturetrail.com/ogilvyspecial1

Because of the 1931 Haskell Catalog format I only selected data that would shed some light on their construction. I manually added the captions to the 10 "cropped images," which give a brief overview of their construction method.

From what I can tell, Chestnut {see album}, only offered a moulded veneer canoe for a very short time, which was an off-shoot of their moulded boat hulls. I've heard from fellows who worked at Chestnut the term, Auto Clave, for the oven used in their process.

Jack


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PostPosted: December 15th, 2004, 11:31 pm 
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Once again I'm blown away by this website, the people who frequent it, and the quality of many of the posts. Thanks for all the thoughtful and prompt responses, and useful links!


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 Post subject: Cold moulded canoe
PostPosted: December 18th, 2004, 7:43 am 
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Yes, you can build cold moulded canoes. Many years ago US Molded Shapes built a cold molded mahogany canoe. They used the same techniques that they used for molding sailboat hulls.

Fairy Marine built thousands of sailboats this way.

The West Epoxy people have a technical manual for home builders who want to do it.

As for wood, you can use cedar for lightweight and put a veneer of maple over it if you like. The maple weighs a lot though and to keep the weight down you may have to use such a thin veneer that it will become fragile.

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PostPosted: January 9th, 2005, 11:58 am 
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I'm seriously thinking of building a wood kayak to replace the plastic sea kayak I have paddled for years. I've always been in love with the sleek fiberglass sea kayaks that come in the bright colours I like, but don't like the price tag. I prefer to paddle out on Georgian Bay or Superior in windy conditions with my boat full of 1 week or more food and equipment. I'm looking at the Pygmy boats that use a stitch and glue method. What are the pros and cons of using the finished product of a plywood boat versus a fiberglass or kevlar boat? Do they respond differently in water or care and maintenance on land?


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PostPosted: January 27th, 2005, 3:56 pm 
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egwald wrote:
I'm looking at the Pygmy boats that use a stitch and glue method. What are the pros and cons of using the finished product of a plywood boat versus a fiberglass or kevlar boat? Do they respond differently in water or care and maintenance on land?


There is nothing intrinsically better or worse about wood boats versus plastic other than plastic boats need less care and the very lightest will usually weigh less. You must evaluate every design on its own merits. Not much help but there are good and bad examples of boats built in every material.

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