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 Post subject: Home Made Boats
PostPosted: June 3rd, 2005, 12:13 am 
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Location: Vancouver, British Columbia Canada
A recent gathering of home-built paddlecraft (mostly kayaks) on the west coast.

http://www.westcoastpaddler.com/buildin ... hp?album=7

So, what do you think of this canoe?

http://www.westcoastpaddler.com/buildin ... m=7&pos=33

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PostPosted: June 4th, 2005, 10:26 pm 
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looks like a derivative of this
http://www.civilization.ca/aborig/water ... 05eng.html


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PostPosted: June 4th, 2005, 10:44 pm 
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Good find, Kim! This is interesting because it may allow the canoes to take on some of the properties of large ships with bulbous underwater noses. I think we examined that topic a couple of years ago on CCR, and decided there would be no advantage to such a canoe design. But who knows.

The horizontal "skegs" on the sides of the bow of the first canoe might provide some interesting characteristics in waves.

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PostPosted: June 4th, 2005, 11:01 pm 
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According to Jennings book The Canoe the Kootenay canoe of the Northwest was suited to running in smooth water and marshes ( I guess it would part grass well). Apparantly it was quick and little affected by the wind.. However it wasnt for use in rapids. This canoe and those of the Amur region of Siberia are quite similar. More hints of a bridge of civilizations?


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PostPosted: June 5th, 2005, 12:08 pm 
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Yeah, do you guys happen to have Jennings "Bark Canoe - The Art and Obsession of Tappan Adney" with the color photos of the models he built? Pages 104 to 111!!! Adney built models of several Sturgeon Nosed Canoes of BC and those from the Lower Amur along the Russian Chinese border. He makes some assumptions about the migration of this canoe building methodology along Sakhalin Island to the Kuriles, the Kamchatka Peninsula, the Commander Islands, Aleutians, and down the coast of BC. I have seen umiaks that have a similar spar at the shovel nose of the boat like the Amur canoe too. Seems that not only did the First Nation people come to America, but they may have brought their canoes too!!!

I can't say I've ever paddled a canoe with a sturgeon nose, but I am intrigued and while my canoe prejudices will probably not allow me to embrace them, I must say, I'd love to learn how and why they are built the way they are. Seems that while modern naval architecture may not be able to embrace the hydrodynamics of such a hull. They obviously had a place in historical boat construction that has evolved out of the modern paddled craft.

Interesting..

PK


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PostPosted: June 5th, 2005, 12:53 pm 
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Sorry PK it WAS that book on the Bark Canoe..I also have the other one on the Canoe a Living History also edited by John Jennings.

Sure the migration is an assumption based on research in other fields

Think you will find in the book you are holding the uses; that is where I got my info ..also did a Google search and I recall an exhibit at the Canadian Canoe Museum about this canoe... there is also a write up and a model at the Musee de la Civilisation in Quebec.which is well worth a visit.


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PostPosted: June 5th, 2005, 1:24 pm 
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Oh, I found the characteristics about the canoe that you are speaking in the Bark Canoe book. But you and I both know that words only tell us so much about the canoe. We have spent many an hour both in person and on the internet discussing the arcane details about canoe design and performance. But unfortunately, words can only go so far. For example, we've discussed John's strip Flashfire, and we share the perspective that even though he lofted it from his factory Flash, something was lost for the negative. We can discuss the finer points about what went wrong, but in the end one just has to paddle it to know what we meant. My girlfriend likes to point out that I sometimes get too technical about my descriptions of a canoe.... with how many inches of rocker or how hard the chine is, and she says, "Just go out there and paddle the damned thing and shut up!." Both you and I fall into the same perspective on this.... you don't have to beg me twice to try a hull I've never paddled. I relish the opportunity to demo a new canoe. It's wonderful to put it through the paces and feel what it can do.

I'd love to paddle that wooden sturgeon-nosed canoe that SGrant posted (by the way, is the "S", for Steve?) and evelop my own opinion with as clear a slate as I can. Words can only do so much to provide me with the knowledge I need. Then I desire to actually take her for a spin. That would be a great treat!!!!

PK


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PostPosted: June 5th, 2005, 2:53 pm 
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Maybe you are just going to have to take a road trip PK. I bet they are hard to find outside of museums.


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PostPosted: June 5th, 2005, 11:51 pm 
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pknoerr wrote:
I'd love to paddle that wooden sturgeon-nosed canoe that SGrant posted (by the way, is the "S", for Steve?) and evelop my own opinion with as clear a slate as I can. Words can only do so much to provide me with the knowledge I need. Then I desire to actually take her for a spin. That would be a great treat!!!!
PK


Correct on the "S". You may be able to contact the owners of the canoe via the website I quoted. It sounds like the home-made boat people have their own "community", and the people with the web site seem to be instrumental in it. Or Orca boats. I have no idea if the owners of the strange craft are part of that group - it sounded like its existence surprised even the group. I've never seen it, but I'm not part of the custom canoe scene.

The nose is not the least of its unusual features, and it's obviously the product of a very creative mind. I would guess that it would go like stink, not turn well, and have poor ability to rise over waves, thus the deck and cowling. It appears to have no thwarts. Sounds like it's not a "trailer queen" either. I'd like to see a picture of the stern also.

Yeah, come on out!

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