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PostPosted: October 12th, 2006, 8:21 am 
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Location: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Dan. wrote:
TO the rest of you.. read the man's needs HE is not tripping and he wants to build it himself.

Where is the guy gonna get plans for a Disco?


What I got from Doug's post is that his need is for a canoe, his prefence is to build it himself. If he could find a Disco at a good price it'll get him on the water safely with his family, tripping or no tripping. The weight of the disco is an advantage for most things he'll probably need it for as the inertia of the boat adds to it's stability making it very suitable for a family with small kids. I know he mentioned a desire for speed in his post but with kids I don't think that's anywhere near as important as stability. After he's got a bit of experience under his belt, he can choose a canoe design that will suit his needs and built it (or possibly them as it might be best to have two).

If he wanted plans for a Disco, it's possible to make your own (assuming you can borrow a Disco for a bit) by following the directions on how to loft a boat from Ted Moores book.


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PostPosted: October 12th, 2006, 11:34 am 
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Location: Vancouver
Dan. wrote:
The Bob's is also a very similiar design, although it has a little less capacity if I remember correctly, it is not the right choice for your intended application.

Look at the temagami if the Winisk is not to your taste, or possible a 17' prospector if you prefer a traditional look.


What/who/where is a temagami? I googled this name and came up with a lot hits for a river, but no canoes.

Quote:
TO the rest of you.. read the man's needs HE is not tripping and he wants to build it himself.


That's pretty much it, but I do appreciate everyone's input. I want the canoe to be stable, but not a pig. 16' to 17' I think, paddled solo or tandem.

Doug


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PostPosted: October 12th, 2006, 2:28 pm 
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DougS wrote:
So I think my canoe requirements ideally would be:
16'-17' in length
compromise between stability and maybe a bit of some speed
can be paddled solo or tandem

Doug


Boat designer I am not, but is this not an almost perfect description of a 16' Prospector?

Lots of beam and capacity for a couple of young ones as well...


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PostPosted: October 12th, 2006, 10:19 pm 
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DougS, if you're on the hunt for plans to build from you may want to give these folks a look as well.....
http://www.carryingplacecanoeworks.on.ca/index.html

Kim Gass posted this link on another topic and I wish I had seen it before I ordered from BM, I would rather have done a Bob's truer to the original. They have a couple of larger models there too that may work out better for your needs.


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PostPosted: October 13th, 2006, 12:54 am 
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Location: Vancouver
RHaslam wrote:
I wouldn't go with the Kipawa for your intended use...at least move up to the Winisk, the Quetico would be better. I built two winisks ina 17 foot basement...you have to go from one corner to the other...it's tight but do-able. ...


Size issue aside, is there any other reason why you wouldn't recommend the Kipawa for my purposes?

Everything is a compromise, that's the tough thing when trying to determine the perfect fit. Here's some of my observations (I could be wrong, i haven't paddled any of these):

Bob's Special: good stability, good for solo and tandem, not so good for waves and higher cargo

Prospector 16: stable, all-rounder, maybe too big for solo or small loads

Freedom 17: diverse, fast, good for solo, but maybe a bit tippy for kids

Kipawa: ??? seems to have good reviews for all-rounder and stability

Winisk: stable, good cargo, kind of big maybe

Anyways, I think I've made up my mind. This has been an interesting discussion though, with some cool links brought up.

Doug


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PostPosted: November 2nd, 2006, 12:26 am 
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Joined: October 10th, 2006, 3:10 pm
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Location: Vancouver
Well, after spending a few hours lofting stations for a Freedom 17 I did a left turn today. I decided to purchase plans for a Freedom 15 and I'll stretch this to 16'. This offers the best compromise for me I feel. It should be a stable canoe with enough room, the design displacement is right where we need it, and it should be relatively efficient to paddle.


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PostPosted: November 11th, 2006, 8:01 am 
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Location: Vermont
I have to say that looking back at all the canoeing I have done over the years, with and without family, one of the only mistakes I made (as far as canoe choices) was when I acquired a small (16') canoe for anything other than solo work. My personal opinion is that there are lots of advantages to a big canoe, very few disadvantages - at least when you are in the water. I say 17' is an absolute minimum for a family canoe and 18 or 20 is even better. Just one man's opinion, thats all.


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PostPosted: November 11th, 2006, 9:51 am 
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Problem is that water isnt the deciding factor often. Portaging and access is. You cannot fly a twenty foot canoe nor train it without paying for it as freight. And cartopping and storage are factors that cant be overlooked.

I agree that Grand Lakers make perfect bring on all the family canoes, but you dont see them in portage country.

When we first started and had one child in tow, we used a 15 foot Grumman in Quetico. It worked on a five day trip. Was it perfect? No but it worked.


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PostPosted: November 11th, 2006, 12:48 pm 
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Location: Geraldton, Ontario Can
I'm building the canoe below this year for the family.

http://members.aol.com/cedarcanoo/outback.htm


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PostPosted: November 11th, 2006, 2:22 pm 
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RHaslam wrote:
I'm building the canoe below this year for the family.

http://members.aol.com/cedarcanoo/outback.htm


Rob,
That looks like it is going to be beautiful. :)
Gen


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PostPosted: November 11th, 2006, 4:03 pm 
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RHaslam wrote:
I'm building the canoe below this year for the family.

http://members.aol.com/cedarcanoo/outback.htm


RH - looks handsome...your family will love it!

My questions if you have a moment (no rush)

Can a person buy a cedar canoe? From where/who?

I don't recall seeing them listed...I see kevlar and fglass and now twintex

Is cedar considered superior to these other synthetic fibres?

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PostPosted: November 11th, 2006, 4:12 pm 
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Location: The Gateway to Woodland Caribou
Langford has them.

I believe Evergreen had them too.

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PostPosted: November 11th, 2006, 4:20 pm 
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Rob mentioned -Langford has them.

And for a company boat they are beautiful too. The sales guy in Oakville mentioned they'd sold a number to the celebrity gang in Muskoka (Arnold Swarz, Goldie, the rich puckheads etc). Such beautiful canoes sitting beside huge cottages - i hope they get some use. Although I prefer my kevlar for what i do, don't you just love seeing someone trippin' with one of these beauties? I love to ask the history of a boat like that; there always seems to be a cool story.

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PostPosted: November 12th, 2006, 7:20 pm 
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RHaslam wrote:
I'm building the canoe below this year for the family.

http://members.aol.com/cedarcanoo/outback.htm


That sounds pretty good! I was closely considering thier Keshequa 170. Their boats have nice classic looks to them (not that I'm very knowledgable in this).


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PostPosted: November 13th, 2006, 10:29 pm 
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RHaslam wrote:
I'm building the canoe below this year for the family.

http://members.aol.com/cedarcanoo/outback.htm


20' x 42"

You must have a big family! Or maybe a pet moose? ;) I look forward to seeing your progress.
Cheers,
Bryan

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