It is currently August 14th, 2020, 9:39 am

All times are UTC - 5 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 7 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: December 1st, 2006, 8:06 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: March 23rd, 2005, 1:41 pm
Posts: 583
Location: Grand Marais, MN
Okay, it's a kayak paddle, but I thought I'd post it. I made it from cedar and ash for the shaft and carbonfiber for the blades. It weighs 40 ounces, but I think I could get the next one down to 32 ounces pretty easily. I made it for about $30 to $40 US.
The shaft is feathered and the feather created with a twist using a set of forms. It's moderately stiff and has a very good feel to it.

I'm thinking of doing a canoe paddle the same way, but I'm not sure what style yet. Any thoughts about what I should do for a canoe paddle?

Image
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Gorgeous
PostPosted: December 5th, 2006, 9:36 pm 
Offline

Joined: September 8th, 2006, 7:11 pm
Posts: 921
Location: winnipeg
That's a really nice look! Thanks for sharing the pictures of your work.

I think your canoe paddle should have a cedar/glass shaft and a 7.5" by 22" beavertail blade made with just kevlar/epoxy and tinted red. the shaft will be perfectly stiff, and the blade will have a bit of flex.

Send me one, and I will test it for you!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: December 7th, 2006, 3:37 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: March 23rd, 2005, 1:41 pm
Posts: 583
Location: Grand Marais, MN
That's not a bad idea. I've never worked with kevlar, so that would be a good excuse to buy some. How do you get the fuzz to lay down on the blade. A thin layer of glass? It's also a good excuse to buy a fiberglass sleeve for the shaft.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: December 16th, 2006, 7:32 am 
Offline

Joined: September 28th, 2004, 6:52 am
Posts: 442
Bryan,

Would have written sooner but had a major computer crash. Must have been a well engineered computer, power supply, motherboard and video card all failed at the same time :D

I have two lightweight paddles that I made. One is 81 inches long and all wood. Cedar with ash faces on the shaft. t weighs 25.7 ounce with the drip guards installed. Not sure what the guards weigh.

The other is 85 inches long and weighs 25.4 ounces with no drip guards. It has a cedar shaft with basswood faces. The blades came off a Lightning paddle that Hank Hays made for me that weighed 23 ounces if I remember correctly. The carbon fiber shaft was too fragile and cracked. I saved the blades to use on the homemade shaft.

I have used and abused both over the past six years so I think you can save a of weight over what you have now. Eighteen ounces is a good target for a canoe paddle unless you plan to do whitewater or crush rocks

_________________
Cheers,

John Winters


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: December 16th, 2006, 11:30 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: March 23rd, 2005, 1:41 pm
Posts: 583
Location: Grand Marais, MN
Wow, John, those weights are incredible. By ash faces, do you mean that the ash is just on the surface and not a complete lamination? If so, how far does the ash go in. That would probably save me a good amount of weight.

I know I can save weight in the ridge on the back of the blade. I went pretty thick on it. And I can use one less layer of carbon, I think. I wish that my shop was heated, because I'd love to get in there and try to make a lighter one now.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: December 17th, 2006, 9:03 am 
Offline

Joined: September 28th, 2004, 6:52 am
Posts: 442
The ash is just on the face of the shaft. I used 1/8" which, after you have shaped the shaft, reduces its weight considerably. The core of the shaft is red cedar and one solid piece. No need to laminate the core since the ash carries the compressive loads. I use no laminates on the shaft or blade except to bead the blade edges. The region of greatest stress is just above the top of the blade so you can extend the ash slightly into the blade area. I use no ridge. You can easily calculate the pressure per square inch as well as the tensile and compressive loads at the shaft. Most paddles are about 86% efficient and you will know how much force you apply to get your desired speeds etc so it is pretty simple math.

I used to use some carbon fiber but found it was not needed. The intersting thing was that an all cedar paddle held up for a remarkably long time before compression shakes showed up on the shaft just above the blade.

I will take some pictures and send them to you if I can figure out how to use my wife's camera. I am the world's greatest klutz at taking pictures so try to avoid it.

Incidentally, using Freeship! you should be able to draw the paddle and then calculate the volume from which you can calculate the finished weight of your paddle. This will allow you to adjust the thickness of the ash etc. as well as adjust the shape and sizes to see how much weight you can save.

_________________
Cheers,

John Winters


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: December 18th, 2006, 1:00 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: March 23rd, 2005, 1:41 pm
Posts: 583
Location: Grand Marais, MN
Thanks, John. I'd love to see the photos. I never thought about using freeship for drawing a paddle. That's a great idea.

Do your paddles incorporate a feather?


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 7 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 5 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group