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PostPosted: January 1st, 2007, 5:10 pm 
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Joined: January 17th, 2005, 8:46 pm
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Location: Buena Vista, Virginia
Take a look at this one. Sure looks comfy, weighs about nothing, and can be fabricated out of a terry cloth towel to try it and see if you like it.

http://www.placidboats.com/portageyoke.html


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PostPosted: January 1st, 2007, 5:18 pm 
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Location: Geraldton, Ontario Can
Looks slippy....I like something hard on my shoulders, cause then i can accurately adjust the pain points...I've double ported lots of canoes on very bad trails....often there will be a few younger kids who are lagging after a hard day, so I'll help them over...double porting isn't as bad as you think, unless the two people involved are of vastly different heights...then it really sucks....I have had to portage up to five or six tin cans in a row over very bad ports...no padding, just aluminium bar...so much of portaging is psychological....I did have a bad wipeout with mohawk type aluminium/plastic paddles tied into a tin can, and thought I had lost an ear...but it was only mildly damaged...haven't tried the tump line yet, have to give it a go this summer.


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PostPosted: January 1st, 2007, 5:51 pm 
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Jwinters, I tried using paddles instead of a yoke only once. It took too long to attach them and I found it too painful to carry. Plus now I often use a bentshaft paddle.


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PostPosted: January 1st, 2007, 6:01 pm 
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Comfort is crucial but I'm interested in discussing solo yokes and how they're attached. What is the perfect removable yoke? Here is mine, in order of priority:

1. Quick to install and remove (especially in black flies/dark/cold/rain etc.)
2. Doesn't come off (ever)
3. Doesn't weigh too much
4. Isn't likely to break on a trip


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PostPosted: January 1st, 2007, 6:01 pm 
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Think of the ways a solo yoke can slide off.

1. laterally, sideways
2. rotating
3. A combination of 1 and 2.
4. clamp or yoke actually breaks apart

With the ears (which probably could be much smaller than shown in my sketch), problems #1, 2 and 3 are entirely eliminated. They alone would add, what, 100, maybe 200, grams?


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 Post subject: Re: removable yoke
PostPosted: January 1st, 2007, 7:04 pm 
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Joined: March 23rd, 2005, 1:41 pm
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Location: Grand Marais, MN
Dave Harman wrote:
Looks good but I don't think it will hold. With all the pounding on a portage I think it will work it's way loose. I use the same clamps on my router table and they come loose!
I use the system that Martin Step has on his web site. Works great!!!!!!!
http://www.greenval.com/FAQsolo-yoke.html


Anything that you'd do to improve the Step-Yoke?


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PostPosted: January 1st, 2007, 7:19 pm 
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Joined: September 26th, 2003, 3:26 pm
Posts: 75
Location: Manhattan, Kansas
I made a yoke using the same clamps shown in the drawing. My boat has aluminum gunwales. I put a strip of rubber (cut from a sheet of rubber using to make gaskets for plumping) on the underside of the gunwales. Never had a problem with the clamps slipping.

I made the slots long enough that I can clamp the thwart to the gunwales behind my seat when on the water. It takes me less than 30 seconds to unclamp the thwart from behind the seat and put it in place. The thwart is easy to reposition to account for differences in balance point.

I saw another website that showed a portage thwart made from aluminum tube. I'm working on a design to combine the two ideas. P.S. I just realized that this idea came from the same website LadyDi posted.

Pete


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PostPosted: January 1st, 2007, 7:32 pm 
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Joined: July 1st, 2001, 7:00 pm
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Location: Auburn, Ontario Canada
Bryan Hansel wrote:
Quote:
Anything that you'd do to improve the Step-Yoke?


I can't think of anything that I would do different, used it for two years now on several trips and it works flawlessly.

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It's all mind over matter,You don't mind it don't matter.
www.harman.wildrec.net


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PostPosted: January 2nd, 2007, 9:00 am 
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Joined: September 28th, 2004, 6:52 am
Posts: 442
Mark wrote;

Quote:
BTW Jwinters, our dad used to carry a very heavy cedarstrip with the paddles as you described. Seemed ok if you don't mind the oval indents in your shoulders.


Yep, that's a problem. If you portage with a pack the pack straps take care of it. If you have a light canoe it isn't a problem. If all else fails you can pad your shoulders with a sweater or towel or what have you. If you lost your towel.......

The paddles also allow you to shift the balance point so you won't need a bow line to tug it down if the tail drags.

Robert M's criteria are good ones and nicely met by the paddle technique. For people in a big hurry you can put loops on the forward thwart and run the loop down trhough the thwart and then through a small jam cleat under the thwart. No knots and no tying.

Of course, the paddle thing lacks the sophisticated appearance of a carved yoke and for the dedicated home buider this is a real negative since building the boat ranks right up there with paddling in terms of pleasure.

Incidentally, I use the paddles on my tandem canoes too.

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John Winters


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: January 2nd, 2007, 11:01 am 
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Joined: June 11th, 2005, 11:19 am
Posts: 1870
Location: Boise, ID
robertm wrote:
The objective is a yoke that is very quick and easy to put-on and won't ever slide off.

Basic design with small modifications that works for me. Perfect fit for shoulders (foam pad has metal backing with built in screws, not sure where you can get one), and adjustable on the gunwales small degrees forward and back. I would recommend against outside ears, since you want to be able to make adjustments to the yoke forward and back. I sometimes have bags attached to the canoe, paddles, fishing rods, etc., and need to be able to change the placement of the yoke so that it has a proper balance. The placement groove in the gunwales (one design) or outside ears would prevent this. If you are worried about it slipping off, you could simply widen the clamp dimensions to cover more surface area. With a small wingnut, washer, leverage on clamp, and fingers, it gets plenty tight to hold fast. If I had aluminum gunwales, I would add some kind of gripping material to clamp, so that it doesn't slide.

Clamp:

Image

Yoke:

Image


Last edited by idylwyld on January 2nd, 2007, 2:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: January 2nd, 2007, 11:04 am 
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Joined: December 19th, 2006, 8:47 pm
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Location: Rattlesnake Pond ME
AndyLee wrote:
Take a look at this one. Sure looks comfy, weighs about nothing, and can be fabricated out of a terry cloth towel to try it and see if you like it.

http://www.placidboats.com/portageyoke.html


Used to have one of these when Charlie was doing Grade VI gear. It was fiddly to wrap around the belly of the canoe and snug up. Sometimes if there was a litle user error and the fit wasnt snug it would rotate on you and not fit properly.

Maybe they have been redone in the ten years since I last used one of those, hopefully. They also tended to give a little more than I wanted.

I know at least of one solo person who has used this idea but instead of belly straps had ends attatched to the inwales on both sides. It was a far more secure attatchment. But I dont remember the details!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: January 2nd, 2007, 11:56 am 
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Joined: August 27th, 2002, 7:00 pm
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Location: Geraldton, Ontario Can
Wow, idylwyld, that black stuff on your yoke looks like part of an industrial grade toilet seat. Please tell that's what it is, and i will worship you as the King of Recycle!

I like your clamp system, been thinking of something like that, very simple.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: January 2nd, 2007, 2:07 pm 
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Joined: June 11th, 2005, 11:19 am
Posts: 1870
Location: Boise, ID
The yoke was actually made by Phil Skigglekow for my Blackhawk Canoe. I've been using it for about 20 years, and have recently made a new wood thwart and clamps to fit a larger canoe. It attached to a running rail below the gunwales (epoxied to the inside of the boat), and could be fitted upsidedown behind the seat (which also ran in the rails) when it wasn't being used (sorry ... don't have photo). Not sure of the material … it's some kind of foam with a resin or light waterproof covering (which has worn off on the corners). It's not really a pad, but a layer of solid foam attached to a metal frame that very slightly conforms to the shape of your shoulders. It wears very well, and am pretty sure it is a third party product (and I wish I could find a replacement to make a second yoke). No toilet seat, but I think I'll chuckle a little next time I'm portaging :)


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: January 2nd, 2007, 4:05 pm 
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Joined: January 17th, 2005, 8:46 pm
Posts: 185
Location: Buena Vista, Virginia
Excellent yoke, I'll copy it if that's okay with you? I'll give you credit when I brag about, I promise :D .

The black part reminds me of the yoke that comes with the Mad River Canoe IQ system. lick this link http://madrivercanoe.com/IQ.php then scroll down to removable yoke.

I've used one of these Mad River removable yokes for a year on a 72# Explorer and I'm convinced its the most comfortable yoke on the market. It bolts to the wood same as yours does, or in the case of the IQ system, it bolts to the round thwart.

It's deep dished to keep pressure totally off your neck, and hollowed out just right to cup your shoulders so the boat doesn't scoot around when your climbing or descending.

thanks again,
Andy


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 Post subject: Yokes and such..
PostPosted: March 5th, 2007, 6:04 pm 
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Joined: March 5th, 2007, 9:53 am
Posts: 574
Location: Belleville, ON
I have to admit that I suffered from painful shoulders and digging yokes in my canoes when I did portages. And yes it was always the pain of the yoke rather than the weight of the canoe that did me in.

Then one day I was doing a simple day trip and didn't have enough weight with me to foist the pack off on my paddling partner.... *PRESTO* The solution became clear.

Now I always carry with the yoke on my pack. It gives me a nice harness complete with hipbelt to distribute the load and not a single pressure point from the yoke as it never actually touches me. It almost makes a portage as fun as a walk in the woods (with a really BIG hat.)...

8)

So much so that I devised a way to make one for my Gloucester Gull rowing dory... I used it to take my dory into 3 Narrow in Killarney. The yoke was a variation on the use the paddles (oars) and a cross bar.


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