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 Post subject: The latest thing...
PostPosted: February 25th, 2007, 8:53 am 
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Joined: July 3rd, 2003, 11:15 am
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Location: on the edge of the big blue
Still reading "Epic Wanderer"
Thompson was looking for a stronger, faster boat.

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"exclusive of painting" He should have painted it red.
Can any of you cedar strippers give him any tips with the leaking problem?
Remember this is 1812.

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PostPosted: February 25th, 2007, 7:17 pm 
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Joined: June 26th, 2006, 8:56 am
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Location: Brantford, Ontario
sink the boat and let it swell? just a thought...use sap in the building process? I'm not a builder (I wish) but just a guess or two
hmmm - Athabasca? Oil tar?
whale oil?

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PostPosted: February 27th, 2007, 6:09 am 
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Kind of hard to know without knowing the construction method. Some boatbuilding methods require greater skills than others to build a solid boat. I suspect Thompson used edge to edge planking and that may have contributed to his problems.

Of course, he may have used dry wood or wet wood or a mix and unless one unfamiliar to me and there are several ways to nail planking. He culd have edge nailed or nailed to frames or whatever.

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PostPosted: February 27th, 2007, 12:09 pm 
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Joined: December 29th, 2002, 7:00 pm
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Location: Bancroft, Ontario Canada
IIRC, the traditional method of sealing planks on larger vessels would have been to pound oakum into the cracks, tightly so that water could not enter. Oakum was some kind of fibrous material mixed with tar, maybe rope and tar... not really sure there.

Maybe they had no substitute for oakum, or the spaces between the planks were too narrow for whatever fiber was on hand along with pine gum. Spruce gum, mixed with rendered bear fat, was the native way of sealing birchbark canoes, maybe that could have worked if mixed with fiber of some sort.

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