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PostPosted: March 29th, 2009, 10:24 am 
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I've been following this thread with a bit of trepidation. My wife and I received our new Esquif Mistral 17.5 yesterday--our wedding present. I'd heard a bit of uncertainty regarding the material when we chose it last fall but decided to take a chance on the promise of a 60-pound tripping boat. And the TwinTex whitewater boats I've seen on the rivers seem to hold up okay.

There's still too much ice to get out up here but hopefully next weekend. Initial impressions after portaging it through the streets of Wawa, Ont (the best I could do): Reasonably light compared to a Royalex canoe, but definitely not as light as Kevlar. The yoke is very comfortable and has a springy feel.

The finish looks okay, though there is an obvious seam on the exterior of the hull where a piece of material was spliced in (it looks like three sheets of Twintex were used--bow section, stern section and a 2.5-foot splice in the middle. The interior is smooth (seams are not noticeable).

Core material (foam, I hope) is "stamped" with circles. Esquif did a nice job installing bow and stern floatation cages.

Lines are beautiful, Prospector-ish. Carbon fibre-look is sexy and cool, offset nicely by yellow logos.

We're taking it on a 12-day trip on the upper Missinaibi this summer. I suppose that will be the ultimate test.

For installing knee pads, it sounds like self-adhesive is the way to go, right?


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PostPosted: March 29th, 2009, 10:32 am 
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Location: Kanata, Ontario Canada
Greenlander, PM Al Greve (if he hasn't already touched base)
he'll talk you through it. He's sold a few Mistrals so he'll be a good contact. He's away today at the races but should be timely after tomorrow.

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PostPosted: March 29th, 2009, 10:49 am 
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GREENLANDER---- For rather careful whitewater paddlers like me, Twintex is very strong and unlikely to crack. I seldom crack my conventional whitewater boats.

I think you can go tripping in your Mystral without having to limit yourselves with concerns about damage. Sensible precautions are still in order. Those who have damaged Twintex Zephyrs have done it in some cases with a classical hard stern thump going over a ledge. If you're running your Mystral with a load, and running a section with ledges, modify your route accordingly. If you're running tandem but with light gear, there's less concern. With experience, there are little squiggles and twists you can do when running ledges so the stern doesn't get thumped as hard.

Back in the 70s and 80s, we paddled an 18.5 foot fiberglass canoe on very ledgy rivers and never cracked the hull..... until we ran Chattooga section 3 at a moderate level, and some ledge whacks produced classical stern compression damage. Still, the boat didn't leak, and the damage was easy for me to fix.

That's the one thing about Twintex. Right now, it isn't easy to fix. But poly boats aren't easy to fix either, and people don't worry about it.


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PostPosted: March 29th, 2009, 11:18 am 
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Greenlander wrote:
We're taking it on a 12-day trip on the upper Missinaibi this summer. I suppose that will be the ultimate test.


Be sure to let us know how it works out. If you get a chance, wrap it around a rock, stomp it back into shape and take some pictures :wink:

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PostPosted: March 29th, 2009, 11:43 am 
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Yeah, right... :-?


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PostPosted: March 29th, 2009, 12:07 pm 
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Location: Kanata, Ontario Canada
I don't think it's the big rocks.....it's the little rocks.....
the ones that you roll a full canoe over on to do the "lazy" dump on shore.

Hubby just cracked his Taureau at the cockpit this way(yes I know it's not the same material :-? )
just an example of a boat I've seen take one hell of a pounding and not even dent, (seriously, he likes lines that pissing in the water changes things)and then a stupid thing damage it. It's the dumb ass should have know better moves like this and drag portaging or cranking the hull down on a rack when it's on it's side or rubbing resistance in transport

And you know....yes you can paddle a roylex boat after it's had a full gear wrap around a rock and then jump on it to get it straight......but it's not as good as new.
Greenlander, you aren't at a boat disadvantage, yes, couple people here are really interested in how the trip goes, shots before and after on the hull if you wish to share would help.
Also what you decided on for your trip repair kit
Cheers!

Edit, on EZ's theme...... wedges between rocks with loads will rip any material.
Tripping is not playboating. It' loaded boat with different forces and controled decent and backferries are in order. If you are wildly out of control, it's not entirely the materials fault.

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PostPosted: March 30th, 2009, 7:04 am 
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I know the Hap Wilson book makes some of the rapids on the Upper Missinaibi out to be dangerously challenging, but having paddled the Upper in high water, the only rapids of real interest were the one the he comments on as 'God-like paddlers may attempt'.

If you can hit smallish eddys, Greenhill is an exercise in eddy hopping. Charging down 'boy scout style' or straight line back paddling could put the boat in places you may not want to be.

I thought the the Upper Missinaibi and the west branch of the Spanish were comparable.

My real hope for Twin-Tex is abrasion resistance for the shallow northern rivers, I'll keep the ABS boat for 'big' water like the Moisie.

Darryl H.


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PostPosted: March 30th, 2009, 7:21 am 
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Regarding fitting of knee blocks, etc.

I used ordinary contact cement for mine and for some D-rings to hold small equipment down. Been in the boat for two years and still intact, no problem.

Bag cages and the pedestal would be a different story and were factory fitted.


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PostPosted: March 30th, 2009, 5:33 pm 
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Location: Coldstream, Ontario Canada
Greenlander wrote:

The finish looks okay, though there is an obvious seam on the exterior of the hull where a piece of material was spliced in (it looks like three sheets of Twintex were used--bow section, stern section and a 2.5-foot splice in the middle. The interior is smooth (seams are not noticeable).


Hi Greenlander,
The lines you're refering to in the 17.5 are parting lines from the mold, its not peices of material spliced together, its all one sheet. Any time when using a two or more peice mold you'll have parting lines. And in the case of these very expensive twin-tex molds that exceed 16' they had to make a center section to make everything work. And the reason you don't see anything in the inside is that the material is layed in simlar to a kavlar boats and the process of vacum bagging.

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PostPosted: March 30th, 2009, 5:41 pm 
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Gail R wrote:

Hubby just cracked his Taureau at the cockpit this way(yes I know it's not the same material :-? )
just an example of a boat I've seen take one hell of a pounding and not even dent, (seriously, he likes lines that pissing in the water changes things)and then a stupid thing damage it. It's the dumb ass should have know better moves like this and drag portaging or cranking the hull down on a rack when it's on it's side or rubbing resistance in transport


Tisk Tisk Tisk :tsk: :tsk: :tsk: :clap: :D Yep what can I say????

Other than thats funny as I know the boy has been trying really hard to keep up with me and some of the studid ass things that I do with my boat. :D
Let him know I have another new one in stock if he wants? :D

And for any of you that arn't to sure of the kind of water that we paddle in these Taureau's you can see in my Avatar me in my boat..... and that boof drop is a little one in compared to some that I've done. :D

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PostPosted: March 31st, 2009, 9:24 am 
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You know Al, come to think of it....he was just fine in his shinny new Ocoee and mitchell till he started hanging out with you...... ......

new boat? maybe next year for ALF, he's upgraded some bike components and the kid needs a new ID dress for the fall so frivilous budget is toast; will keep it in mind though.
Drop him an email, sring has sprung, time to talk boat abuse plans :wink:

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PostPosted: May 26th, 2020, 1:14 pm 
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Twin-tex! Well there's one I'd never heard of before!

Talk about thread necromancy! :-)

I guess the fact that I've never heard of it means that it has basically died as a material to use in canoes? Though looks like Esquif is still using it?


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PostPosted: May 26th, 2020, 2:50 pm 
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TwinTex was an Esquif invention, it was (sort of) an interim replacement/alternative for Royalex. It was fraught with problems mostly related to repairs plus it was expensive.

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PostPosted: May 26th, 2020, 3:04 pm 
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recped wrote:
TwinTex was an Esquif invention, it was (sort of) an interim replacement/alternative for Royalex. It was fraught with problems mostly related to repairs plus it was expensive.

and hilarity.. was supposed to stay afloat. At a rescue demo here in Maine Rory Matchett and Reid Maclachlan tried to demo how to rescue a capsized canoe. The capsized Twin Tex Esquif just sank and came up fifty meters away on a pond. When Reid was trying to catch it and it just sank like the Titanic he had an expression on his face that only he can pull off.


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