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PostPosted: June 12th, 2009, 7:26 pm 
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Location: Ontario
I am finally finishing off a cedar strip strictly solo canoe that I found half finished. I bought it as is with no instructions. I have the gunwales on and am trying to figure out exactly where to put the one seat. I generally paddle with my butt against the seat and knees on the ground. Any suggestions on placment of the seat. Would you recommend centering my knees in the canoe and the seat back from there? Or would you recomend knees slightly ahead of centre. From what I can tell this canoe is very much like the Bell Magic design, very narrow.

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PostPosted: June 12th, 2009, 9:10 pm 
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Hi Spear.

I think you will find your answer here:

http://www.solotripping.com/community/s ... light=seat

Check out Charlie Wilson's post.

GG

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PostPosted: June 13th, 2009, 6:25 am 
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Excellent information. Thanks.

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PostPosted: July 12th, 2009, 12:58 pm 
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I'd then use a sliding seat mount to allow a range of positions based on that starting point. But that's because I like adjustment. I'm sure Charlie's post has the good stuff in it.

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PostPosted: November 3rd, 2009, 10:10 am 
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Location: dartmouth NS
Hi

You need to determine how you are going to paddle the canoe.Loaded or not.Fixed seat or sliding.

The info at solo tripping is great.

There is a mathematical method called moments.Do a web search under yacht design.for this method.Basically you have the empty boat balanced on a single point(usually the middle).You place the objects(known weights) at given positions from the middle(forward and aft of middle). You will get an very good balance with moment calculations.

There is more to this method than my short paragraph.Some common sense and practical experience in advised.

As with other posters the need to determine style of padding and the ability to change trim is of great importance.

Karl


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PostPosted: November 3rd, 2009, 12:30 pm 
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The biggest problem with balancing the canoe on a given point is that in the water, the center of boyancy can/will not be at the same point, especially if the canoe is asymetrical. The best way to find a great place to put the seat is not to put it in until you have taken the canoe for a test paddle or two, loaded and empty, and mark where you are sitting when you paddle while keeping the canoe level. As spotter on shore can help you by eyeballing how level the canoe sits in the water.

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PostPosted: November 3rd, 2009, 12:36 pm 
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Location: Belleville, ON
I use an RV trim level like this http://www.canadiantire.ca/AST/browse/4 ... BLevel.jsp, set to match the design waterline trim and then I can check my trim myself from inside the boat without an outside spotter and have repeatable trim points.

(Not intended to be a sales promotion, just an example of the type of thing I'm talking about.)

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PostPosted: November 5th, 2009, 12:07 pm 
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doftya wrote:
The biggest problem with balancing the canoe on a given point is that in the water, the center of boyancy can/will not be at the same point, especially if the canoe is asymetrical. The best way to find a great place to put the seat is not to put it in until you have taken the canoe for a test paddle or two, loaded and empty, and mark where you are sitting when you paddle while keeping the canoe level. As spotter on shore can help you by eyeballing how level the canoe sits in the water.


The best, and safest in the long run, is to see how it handles the wind when you are near shore. If the boat wants to turn into the wind (weathercocking) you are too far forward. If it wants to face away from the wind (weathervaning) it is too far back. If it seems somewhat indifferent to the wind, it is in its "Goldilocks" position.

BTW, the boat need to be moving near cruising speed to make this determination since the pivot point will move forward once the boat starts to move. For that reason, moving the seat back an inch or so from "ideal" might be a better all around solution for most folks. Not only will the boat be neutral at slower speeds, it is a lot easier to deal with a little weathervaning that it is to deal with its counterpart.

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PostPosted: December 7th, 2009, 12:08 pm 
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First one needs to determine if one will be sitting low, as in a pack canoe or kayak, sitting mid height, like in a sit and switch hull like many Wenonah's and the Bell magic, or kneeling. Seat placement will move aft through that sequence.

Secondly, consider hull shape; is the hull fish-form, symmetrical or Swede-form? Seat placement will move aft through that sequence.

Thirdly, what is the paddlers body form? Heavier folk need the seat further aft because their CG if farther forward of their spine.

Testing, as previously mentioned, is the best method, except, while it is easy to scoot a low seat fore and aft to determine best trim for you and your paddling style, speed, etc, it is kinda hard to mount dropped seat in various positions. In a perfect world every dealer would have "try hulls" with slider seats, and most sit and switch hulls come with sliders on pedestals.

Roughly, for trim folk kneeling in symmetrical hulls, drilling the front seat screw 6" aft of center works pretty well. And, the single fixed seat is the lightest and most rugged option.


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PostPosted: December 22nd, 2009, 1:40 pm 
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Location: NWSC
If I'm ever to get back on the water, I'm going to have to have a center seat. My poor knees just won't stand kneeling for more than two hours, and that last thirty minutes is very interesting.

Of course, finding a well-done design has been something of an issue. I do know that I'll have to remove the yoke from my Morningstar to get kneeling room when I need it, and a sliding capability would make trimming almost too easy. But, where to look? What to buy? Anyone come up with a design that just seems to be right?

It's been entirely too long a wait, but this guy seems to have hit the nail on the head. Very clean design with good structural support for the bigger paddler, and I love the yoke holder at the rear.

http://www.solotripping.com/community/showthread.php?t=2639

In fact, I can seriously see me doing a complete rebuild of my Morningstar just to fit this seat in the center!

If he doesn't sell me one, I'm gonna try my hand at it. Of course that will probably mean I need to buy a new gunwale or two before all is said and done......

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PostPosted: December 22nd, 2009, 3:52 pm 
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Location: Bancroft, Ontario Canada
You must have seen this sliding seat from Green Valley...

http://www.greenval.com/FAQbowsliderseat.html

I've been planning on building a dedicated solo for some time now, with slider... the seat crossmembers would run in a gap between the rail and the inwale, with only two seat positions, fore and aft. Bungees would keep the seat at either location, with an intermediate position possible by jamming a wood spacer into the inwale-rail gap.

Not as elegant as the above design, fine trim should be possible by shifting loads around.

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PostPosted: December 22nd, 2009, 4:08 pm 
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Location: Belleville, ON
I've thought about doing one with sail trim carriages and cleated rope loops to adjust and lock position. I wanted to be able to adjust it easily on the fly.

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