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PostPosted: September 18th, 2009, 7:31 pm 
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Back in the late 1800s, they often made rowing shells out of paper mache. So don't sniff at Kleenex as a building material.


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PostPosted: September 18th, 2009, 8:28 pm 
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ezwater wrote:
Back in the late 1800s, they often made rowing shells out of paper mache. So don't sniff at Kleenex as a building material.


it must have been the good crap - that monster, 3 ply man-size stuff our grandpa used. you could wrap a baby in that and forget the diaper.

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PostPosted: September 19th, 2009, 10:11 am 
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So don't sniff at Kleenex as a building material.


If you decide to do a prototype please post pic's of the process. :wink:


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PostPosted: September 19th, 2009, 11:31 am 
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Yep ezwater..wanna build a paper canoe? From Wikipedia.

Paper boats
One common item made in the 1800s in America was the paper canoe, most famously made by Waters & Sons of Troy, New York. The invention of the continuous sheet paper machine allows paper sheets to be made of any length, and this made an ideal material for building a seamless boat hull. The paper of the time was significantly stretchier than modern paper, especially when damp, and this was used to good effect in the manufacture of paper boats. A layer of thick, dampened paper was placed over a hull mold and tacked down at the edges. A layer of glue was added, allowed to dry, and sanded down. Additional layers of paper and glue could be added to achieve the desired thickness, and cloth could be added as well to provide additional strength and stiffness. The final product was trimmed, reinforced with wooden strips at the keel and gunwales to provide stiffness, and waterproofed. Paper racing shells were highly competitive during the late 1800s. Unfortunately, few examples of paper boats survived. One of the best known paper boats was the canoe, the "Maria Theresa," used by Nathaniel Holmes Bishop to travel from New York to Florida in 1874–1875. An account of his travels was published in the book "Voyage of the Paper Canoe."[9][10


(I am wondering about its abrasion resistance to rocks :wink: )


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PostPosted: September 20th, 2009, 10:21 am 
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Unfortunately, few examples of paper boats survived.


Guess that helps explain why composites became so popular.... :wink:


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PostPosted: September 20th, 2009, 12:45 pm 
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I suspect that what ended the realm of paper mache rowing shells was when sawmills learned how to cut giant sheets of western red cedar, devoid of knots, and boat builders learned to bend these sheets into racing boats. At that time, there was no fiberglass, much less Kevlar or carbon cloth, and there was no suitable resin either. Wooden sheet rowing craft dominated into the 70s. But they were too fragile for wilderness rivers. I had one, and occasionally needed to repair it just from hitting floating logs at speed.


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