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Your new canoe will weigh 38 lbs natural, or 44 lbs painted, what do you prefer?
Natural all the way, baby, I like the look! 33%  33%  [ 9 ]
I don't really prefer natural, but I want a lighter canoe! 30%  30%  [ 8 ]
Give me paint, a nice traditional colour! 19%  19%  [ 5 ]
Might as well make her real pretty, two tone please! 19%  19%  [ 5 ]
Total votes : 27
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PostPosted: October 22nd, 2009, 4:34 pm 
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Just wondering what people are more inclined to go for, if you don't mind, answer the poll above! thanks!

Just so there is no confusion, I am talking about the brand spanking new canoe you will be purchasing from your favourite local retailer / outfitter / canoe builder. And (s)he can provide you with either a natural finish canoe (might be infused clear, or clearcoated, doesn't matter), or a coloured finish canoe (using the standard gelcoat prior to molding in whatever colour you choose)

Just run with the assumption that other than what is specified in the question, the boat happens to be kevlar construction, and otherwise about as perfect as you could want!


Last edited by davidchiles on October 22nd, 2009, 6:03 pm, edited 8 times in total.

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PostPosted: October 22nd, 2009, 4:56 pm 
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I want paint so the "battle scars" show up better.

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PostPosted: October 22nd, 2009, 5:28 pm 
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I am curious also, as it seems most american manufacturers have gone the natural skin look for a number of years already (I mean, how natural is kevlar aramid cloth!), wheras many Canadian manufacturers still paint their canoes.


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PostPosted: October 22nd, 2009, 5:46 pm 
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Paint my canoe.

Paint my canoe.

Paint my canoe.

I said it three times and it still sounds all wrong.

I'll paint the dog house. I'll paint a picture. But I'll never paint a canoe. Especially a kevlar one. Just doesn't seem right.

If you want to hide some of the imperfections you could always use this.

NBCK Finish Restorer from the North Bay Canoe Company

I've used it and it works great. The scratches magically disappear.

davidchiles wrote:
I am curious also, as it seems most american manufacturers have gone the natural skin look for a number of years already (I mean, how natural is kevlar aramid cloth!), wheras many Canadian manufacturers still paint their canoes.

Nova Craft, EverGreen, Swift Canoes or any reputable manufacturer in Canada that I know of does not paint their canoes. They colour them when they apply the gel coat. Paint will strip off whereas gel coat will not. Unless you hit a good sized rock?

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Last edited by Tripper on October 22nd, 2009, 5:57 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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PostPosted: October 22nd, 2009, 5:55 pm 
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thanks!

sorry man! by paint, I don't mean paint as in take out a roller, paintbrush, or spraygun and paint it, I meant buying a brand new canoe made with a 'gelcoat' paint finish...I don't think the average layman even knows the term 'gelcoat', he or she sees a canoe that has a coloured finish, and assumes it is paint.

I guess you could say I own canoes on a revolving basis, and have my choice of canoes to keep, try, test, etc. (not many mind you, but certainly enough)

I own a beautiful red H20 Composites Prospector 16 2009, in fibreglass, with the normal amount of scratches and stuff.

I had a red H20 Composites Canadian 16-6 as a demonstrator, which is now being enjoyed by a gentleman near Bancroft.

I am planning to 'build' a two tone (blue on white) kevlar ultralight Canadian 16-6 with wood gunwales.

and am possibly thinking of a kevlar boat natural finish to try out.

thanks!


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PostPosted: October 22nd, 2009, 6:38 pm 
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I went with...

Quote:
I don't really prefer natural, but I want a lighter canoe!


Seven pounds of gelcoat makes a difference... that's a canoe that's 18% heavier. Three coats of enamel on the outside adds about a pound, and IMO the improvement in looks is worth it.

I'd forget the gelcoat and paint it myself after some scratching built up.

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PostPosted: October 22nd, 2009, 6:49 pm 
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Quote:
I don't really prefer natural, but I want a lighter canoe!

So, I bought a Souris River Trailhead Prospector, woven colour canoe - red of course, they're faster :wink: Owned a natural colour Souris Wilderness for years but the new woven colour canoes do show the battle scars even better :lol: Tough canoes, have never babied mine and at 40 lbs on the portage :thumbup:

http://www.sourisriver.com/fabric_options.html
Cheers
Sid

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PostPosted: October 22nd, 2009, 7:19 pm 
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I have both and will continue to own both. I want a non gelcoated boat for flatwater tripping, and I want a gelcoated boat for running the casual rocky rivers with the Class IIs and the little class IIIs.

I suspect that Canadian manufacturers have stuck with the gelcoat because of two things and both are geological. First, alot of the tripping in Canada is done on rivers strewn with crystalline rock. Most of the US is underlain by sedementary rocks. Gelcoated boats my not hold up better on impact, but hold up alot better to abrasion on gneiss, greenstone, and quartzite than skin coat. The second reason is that most Americans associate tripping with paddling flatwater... more Canadians associate tripping with running rapids.

PK


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PostPosted: October 22nd, 2009, 8:13 pm 
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I want a gelcoated boat for flatwater tripping but not for what is in the water.

Most of my rough action takes place on portages. My balance on Canadian basalt is awful and my boats take a banging. There often is a fair amount of having to drag over obstacles too be it trees or a very rocky put in that defies good balance with a canoe on your head. Gel coat seems to dampen the impact on the structural components of the boat when its dropped on land.


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PostPosted: October 22nd, 2009, 9:18 pm 
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Royalex. The tougher the better. 2nd choice is wood.

I don't have a kevlar boat and have never really considered purchasing one.

Maybe one day when I get old and turn 30.

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PostPosted: October 22nd, 2009, 11:05 pm 
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Dan. wrote:
Royalex. The tougher the better. 2nd choice is wood.

I don't have a kevlar boat and have never really considered purchasing one.

Maybe one day when I get old and turn 30.


You're already old. Your body knows it, your mind just hasn't accepted it yet. That happens right after you pass your 30th, but by then it's too late.

Anyway, I'm with you on this one. Rented a tough old MR Explorer last year. Solid as a rock. The weight felt good, even on shoulders more than twice as old as yours.

My Pal should feel about the same once I get the canvas on it. Canvas with real paint, not chippy gel coat

Ever look at Bill Mason's Prospector, the one they gave to the museum. How many times to you think that had to be painted in it's lifetime? Maybe never! I wish I could have put that much abuse onto one canoe.

Marine enamel is tough stuff and doesn't weigh crap compared to gel coat.

Skin coat is fine until the sun starts to kill the Kevlar, then you paint it. That's what I'm going to do with mine next year. Save about five pound over the same boat I almost bought with gel coat. I think I'll have my buddy shoot a couple coats of two-part poly on it. Should last forever.

Canoes don't rust.

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PostPosted: October 23rd, 2009, 7:57 am 
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Royalex, Blech! I remember Andrew Westwood telling me 10 years ago that Royalex wasn't the ultimate material for whitewater.... you give up too much performance.... but there still really hasn't been anything to effectively replace it yet either. If I were startintg a canoe company today I wouldn't invest in Royalex manufacture. It's old technology that builds durable boats, but I've yet to meet anyone that would actually rather paddle one than a composite boat. Twin-Tex might not be the replacement.... but as John said, new plastics are being designed each year... there will be something better.

PK


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PostPosted: October 23rd, 2009, 8:22 am 
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Aw, c'mon! There is a place for Royalex, like there is a place for ultralites. I don't have a Royalex, it's not that I'm avoiding them, I just don't feel like picking one up at the moment.... <grunt>...

:wink:

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PostPosted: October 23rd, 2009, 8:26 am 
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The comments are interesting, but I would appreciate it if more of you clicked on one of the choices! What I really want to know is regardless of if you were actually going to buy a new kevlar boat, IF you had to, would you want it manufactured with a paint finish (in this particular case 'gelcoat' the industray standard now) or in an unpainted natural finish, knowing that a natural finish boat will weigh a fair bit less (and I think the guys who think 3 coats of marine enamel weigh only a pound, should weigh their boats before and after, because I am not sure that would be the case.)


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PostPosted: October 23rd, 2009, 8:32 am 
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frozentripper wrote:
Aw, c'mon! There is a place for Royalex, like there is a place for ultralites. I don't have a Royalex, it's not that I'm avoiding them, I just don't feel like picking one up at the moment.... <grunt>...

:wink:


Yeah, I have three of them... I'm just hoping that a new canoe company hoping to build enthusiast level canoes beginning in 2010 does not have the chance to recoup the tooling costs to start building a line of Royalex boats.

Let's hope something better comes along.

PK


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