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PostPosted: February 8th, 2010, 8:51 am 
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Joined: June 12th, 2006, 10:38 pm
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Location: Merrickville, Ontario, Canada
I have a Royalex canoe that was wrapped around a rock. The repairs are progressing well, but when we heated the hull the press out the last of the bulge the Royalex partially split where the fold had been the worse. I'm not sure if the split was directly caused by the heat, or whether the heat just allowed tension in the Royalex to pull the material apart. The split doesn't go right through the material to the inner vinyl layer.

I was wondering if I could just fill the damage with epoxy. I thought that would look better than laying cloth on the repair.

Image


Thanks,

Allan.


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PostPosted: February 8th, 2010, 9:29 am 
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Location: Ottawa
Hi Allan,

It is difficult to guage by the photo the size and depth of the split so this may not work but consider it. I have used the "petex"(?) rods that you buy to repair a ski base to fill in such holes or cuts before. Simply melt the petex over the hull so that it drips into the crease and fill it. Let it stand to solidify. You can then scrape it and sand it to a smooth even surface. I then painted over the repair, Canadian Tire car touch up paint. The repairs that I have made this way have lasted for several years with no sign of weakening or damage to the surrounding hull.

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PostPosted: February 8th, 2010, 9:44 am 
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Joined: June 12th, 2006, 10:38 pm
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Location: Merrickville, Ontario, Canada
Thanks for the tip. The largest tear is at most half way through the Royalex core, the others are just through the outer vinyl layer with the core untouched.


Thanks,

Allan.


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PostPosted: February 8th, 2010, 10:21 am 
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Joined: June 25th, 2001, 7:00 pm
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Location: Kanata, Ontario Canada
That the bottom of the boat?
If you don't do a patch (not saying you need to) then I would shore up the repair kit. Good size pice of cloth or two and more epoxy ( west sells a bag of 6 individual use epoxy, I'd take two) can get them at the chandlery in Ottawa
and make a spare hockey stick thwart for this area and pack it with some screws and a driver. If she wraps again mid trip, it might need the support.
little more than a love tap but still very servicable.
Don't drag it loaded through a portage or let the kids bridge it between rocks on shore with a load and it will be fine for years yet.
ski stuff sounds great; 3M has a two part epoxy (scotch weld urethane forget the number) might be this one?
http://www.ellsworth.com/display/produc ... ab=Vendors
that's flexable and really tough but it's pricey at over 50 bucks for a couple oz tube at outfitting stores. might get a better deal online

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PostPosted: February 8th, 2010, 10:36 am 
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Location: Ottawa
Allan,

I think that the petex will work just fine. The melting point is low and thus the hot liquid should not adversely impact on the ABS substrate. Try it on a small portion first just to be sure. The petex provides just about the right balance between rigidity and flexibility for the Royalex canoe. One of these sticks as an integral part of the field repair kit is inexpensive, easy to pack, and usable at all temperatures in the field. Simplifies any repairs that it is suitable for (size/depth etc).
If you try it let me know later in the season how it is working.

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PostPosted: February 8th, 2010, 10:40 am 
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Location: Merrickville, Ontario, Canada
The area is actually exactly inline with the yoke. It is not on the bottom, and not on the side, but on the sloping part where bottom meets side. Though a little closer to the bottom than to the side.

Just last year we started carry two (in separate canoes) of the following repair kits on our trips. Not shown is the epoxy (355mL of Cold Cure) and the fiberglass cloth as we were in the midst of changing out the brand we carry.

The P-Tex is looking promising. Something else to add to our repair kit. Will let people know after the trip this summer how the repair held out.

Image


Thanks,

Allan.


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PostPosted: February 8th, 2010, 12:04 pm 
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Joined: July 23rd, 2002, 7:00 pm
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Location: Concord, Massachusetts
I'm using G-flex epoxy to fix a softball size hole in Royalex. You could fill your divot with G-flex thickened with silica. Cover the cured epoxy with paint for UV protection.

Here is my hole project. The hole will get some fiberglass patches next:

http://outdoors.webshots.com/album/576663027xMJnSL


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PostPosted: February 8th, 2010, 2:14 pm 
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Location: Beaumont, AB
Rick Reid wrote:
Allan,

I think that the petex will work just fine. The melting point is low and thus the hot liquid should not adversely impact on the ABS substrate. Try it on a small portion first just to be sure. The petex provides just about the right balance between rigidity and flexibility for the Royalex canoe. One of these sticks as an integral part of the field repair kit is inexpensive, easy to pack, and usable at all temperatures in the field. Simplifies any repairs that it is suitable for (size/depth etc).
If you try it let me know later in the season how it is working.


If you are not concerned with strength, the P-tex will probably be ok for filling a hole, maybe providing some UV resistance to the core material, and possibly even reducing water contact with core. The P-tex will do nothing for strengthening the boat. In order to strengthen the hull, you would have to add a patch of some kind.

regards
dave

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PostPosted: February 8th, 2010, 2:40 pm 
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You could try the Ptex, or the 3M 2-part adhesive, or Aquaseal, or you could melt ABS with acetone and make a paste, I don't think G-flex is available in Canada?...

I haven't tried the Ptex. I quit using the 3M, which has been a standartd in Royalex repair, because it's a little too brittle (not as bad as most epoxies) and tends to re-crack in any area where there is flex. I've had good success with Aquaseal (or Goop) for repairing interal cracks in the Royalex. My preference for an outside repair like that would be the ABS slurry, though mixing an acetone milkshake and putting it in contact with the guts of your hull isn't for everybody.

Try a couple side-by-side and let us know what worked better!

Regardless of what you use to fill the gouges, you could glass the inside for the structural support.

Pat.

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PostPosted: February 8th, 2010, 2:44 pm 
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Location: Concord, Massachusetts
Available in Canada? Not sure, but that question did cross my mind. It is a West Systems product.

http://www.gougeonbrothers.com/G-flex/


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PostPosted: February 8th, 2010, 3:14 pm 
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Location: Cambridge, Ontario
Whatever you do, do it quickly and before the boat sees water again. You don't want the foam core exposed for long.

I've filled similar cracks with a varity of epoxy's such as JB weld, 5 minute plastic weld as well as black abs pipe melted in acetone. Several have held, but occasionally the fill has popped out if it's an area that get's flex. Glassing it is a sure fix, but I agree for asthetic puroposes it's a last resort.


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PostPosted: February 8th, 2010, 3:33 pm 
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Location: Coldstream, Ontario Canada
yarnellboat wrote:
You could try the Ptex, or the 3M 2-part adhesive, or Aquaseal, or you could melt ABS with acetone and make a paste, I don't think G-flex is available in Canada?...


Pat.


By far the best material that I've found for repairing royalex boats is Black ABS pipe and Acetone. After-all what material is the outside of the hull? ABS. First, in a small jar throw in a ABS fitting, add the acetone and melt it, make a paste of it. Here's the TRICK, DON'T APPLY heavy layers, one thin one at a time. LET DRY EVERY LAYER before doing the next!. You now will continue to apply thin layers until the desired surface level.
Warning...... if you apply to think of layers you run the risk of eating a whole through the boat. :doh:
When finished, paint over the area with same colour as boat........ its like you'll have a new boat! :wink:


And the best part it cost little to fix! :wink:

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PostPosted: February 8th, 2010, 3:46 pm 
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G-Flex must have some strong bonding power... here's an Epoxyworks article (also published by West System's Gougeon Brothers) on a repair where 58 cracks went right through the hull.

http://www.epoxyworks.com/26/pdf/Repair ... _canoe.pdf

This might be overkill for your repair, still could be an option at some time if fiberglass cloth repairs aren't wanted.

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PostPosted: February 8th, 2010, 4:06 pm 
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I don't think of glass as a sure fix on Royalex! It is so less flexible that it often cracks and/or pops off eventually too. And if I'm glassing, I just do it on the inside.

ABS slurry has been the best for me. Like Al says, put it on thin and let it dry. Also, don't maix the slurry too light. So, thin layers of thick slurry.

Pat.

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PostPosted: February 8th, 2010, 5:38 pm 
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Location: Atlanta
I wouldn't use glass on the inside of the boat, only Kevlar. But on the outside of the boat, I would use 6 oz S-glass. Strip the vinyl off first---- easily done with a sharp chisel held at a low angle. G-flex epoxy will wet out these cloths, though it takes care. Otherwise use West 105/205.

I have a 2 layer S-glass exterior patch, right under the solo pedestal on the outside of the hull, which is holding up VERY well. S-glass is the hardest material one can use for exterior repairs, and it is also tougher than carbon by far.


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