It is currently October 20th, 2020, 4:18 am

All times are UTC - 5 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 7 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: February 18th, 2010, 5:23 pm 
Offline

Joined: April 11th, 2009, 9:43 am
Posts: 444
Location: Central Maine--Sheepscot Watershed
I have purchased a cedar over oak framed sculling boat. (That's a duck sculling boat, not a boat for rowing crew.) It is at a distance so I can't see it in person, but it's a boat I really want at a price that's really good.

Based on photos, discussion with the seller, and a visit from a friend of a friend who tooks some photos, the only issue with the boat is a pair of long cracks in the fiberglass, along the keel line.

(Photos of the boat are here, but do not shows the cracks, which are towards the bow.)

http://cgi.ebay.com/Merrymeeting-Scull- ... 35a6ad2f9f

It's just over 16 feet long, about 50 inches in beam.

This was built as a wood boat over 50 years ago, then never used until it was purchased in 2006. The new owner glassed it, used it for a couple of seasons, and died. His son is selling the boat.

The friend who looked at the boat knows wood boats, and the wood is sound--no damage, rot or insect damage. My only concern is the cracked fiberglass.

What is the worst case scenario here? If I have to strip off the glass and reglass this boat, I'm willing, and I'd still be getting the boat at a good price. Is there anything worse than that I should be worried about?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: February 19th, 2010, 5:27 pm 
Offline

Joined: October 5th, 2008, 9:32 am
Posts: 165
This vintage of boat was not built to be glassed so I'd be curious why the previous owner did so. That and the fact the glass job failed so soon after it was done. When you encapsolate (sp??) wood as in a stripper canoe the intent is to isolate the wood from moisture. If you only glass one side and allowing the other side to take on water you have a battle between the dry side and the expanding (wet) side, the expanding side is going to win.

And no, your're not going to glass the inside, attempting to run glass up and over the frames will bring you to tears and you would need to roll out all the air to make the job right.

I can't comment on the price but if you buy it I would suggest removing the glass and try to figure out why it was glassed in the first place. It's possible that the boat was made to be canvassed or left to take up.

You may be happier in the long run to build a new boat. There are a few duck boat designs, built in the "stitch & glue" method in plywood. You may even find a precut kit that you simply assemble.

Cheers,
Ken


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: February 19th, 2010, 7:14 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: February 19th, 2004, 9:53 pm
Posts: 1451
Location: Atlanta
I somewhat agree with the anxieties expressed by the previous poster. However, I think you can glass the cracked areas and get a lot of use out of the boat.

Sand the cracked areas, tapering away from the cracks. Use 2 or 3 concentric patches of E-glass, and a thin epoxy such as West 105/205. Glass the largest patch on first, and so on down to the smallest, adding layers BEFORE the epoxy sets. Putting some plastic food wrap on may smooth the result and reduce final sanding. It may be a good idea to put some spar varnish on, one with a UV inhibitor.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: February 20th, 2010, 10:49 am 
Offline

Joined: October 5th, 2008, 9:32 am
Posts: 165
I wouldn't disagree with ezy's repair solution but I fear it will be a recurring theme. I would apply the layup stack in the reverse order though. But I suspect there is only a single layer of 6 oz. cloth.

Ken


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: February 20th, 2010, 2:25 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: February 19th, 2004, 9:53 pm
Posts: 1451
Location: Atlanta
The practice of patching with the largest patch first, on down to the smallest, goes all the way back to Wallbridge's Boatbuilders Manual[u][/u]. It would not be as important in this case, but when covering a dished out area, it allows the largest patch to cross the previous cloth areas, and it does not leave pocket discontinuities hidden under subsequent layers of cloth. The edges of each patch are on the surface where they can be faired by sanding. Strength over aesthetics.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: February 21st, 2010, 8:04 pm 
Offline

Joined: April 11th, 2009, 9:43 am
Posts: 444
Location: Central Maine--Sheepscot Watershed
Thanks for the thoughts.

I believe the main reason these boats get glassed is that when they were built, they were built to be left in the water. Now that that they are normally used on a trailer, with dry storage, the wood doesn't stay swollen so they'll leak.

There are a lot of these old boats around, and all the ones I've seen are glassed. Would canvassing be another possible way to ensure water tightness in a trailered boat?

In addition to being a pain, I suspect that glassing the inside would be a good recipe for the wood to rot.


I'll be picking up the boat in a couple of weeks, and will post photos when I have it in hand.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: February 22nd, 2010, 10:24 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: February 19th, 2004, 9:53 pm
Posts: 1451
Location: Atlanta
If the inside is ribbed and convoluted, I wouldn't try to glass it. Adds weight anyway. But if you wanted to strip and clean the inside wood, you could apply an epoxy with a UV inhibitor, like West 105/207.

My suggestion, though, is that you patch the outide and then just use and enjoy the boat for a season.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 7 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 5 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot] and 3 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group