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 Post subject: 20' Tremblay
PostPosted: March 14th, 2010, 8:33 pm 
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Joined: September 8th, 2006, 7:11 pm
Posts: 921
Location: winnipeg
I'm looking at a canoe that is 20' by 44", Tremblay, the FW (flat wide) stern, made in 1974, and covered in verolite. It has only one seat in the stern, and three thwarts (plus a bow thwart). Seller claims it is rated at 1600lbs capacity.

Any ideas on what this thing might weigh? I understand the designer was planning around a motor, but how would such a craft paddle? If motored, what sort of engine weight would work best? Would it be the Pontiac or Ontario? http://www.wcha.org/catalogs/tremblay/index.html

Assuming good condition, what do you reckon is a fair price?

Thanks all!


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 Post subject: Re: 20' Tremblay
PostPosted: March 15th, 2010, 11:48 am 
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Joined: July 17th, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 1618
Location: Toronto, Ontario Canada
I'd say 120 lbs (wood with Verolite),
I paddled a 14' Tremblay with Verolite in 1974 and it was not light!
As for the price, I would not go over $1,000.00

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 Post subject: Re: 20' Tremblay
PostPosted: March 15th, 2010, 3:11 pm 
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Joined: January 29th, 2007, 10:19 am
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Location: Just outside the Blue Line
Otter Mel wrote:
I'd say 120 lbs (wood with Verolite)


Not a bad guess, OM.

http://www.wcha.org/catalogs/tremblay/index.html

Don't count on it safely carrying 1600#, however. :wink:

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 Post subject: Re: 20' Tremblay
PostPosted: March 15th, 2010, 4:46 pm 
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Joined: August 27th, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 2562
Location: Geraldton, Ontario Can
This type of canoe used to be the standard in the north, although I haven't seen many in verolite. That 110 pounds is a dream, or a wish, once those things soak up some waters, count on it being closer to 200 pounds. You will definately want to be trailering it. 15 horse was pretty much the standard on them.

I love those canoes, they are the real deal for working and hauling stuff. They will fit a ton of gear, and are a lot more sea worthy than a 16 foot aluminium boat.

However, don't count on paddling it far. It is meant to be motorized.

O ya, verolite doesn't have a long shelf life, it's probably ready to be replaced. It get's quite soft as it ages, and is easily cut. Canvas is superior.


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 Post subject: Re: 20' Tremblay
PostPosted: April 7th, 2010, 8:31 pm 
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Joined: August 20th, 2009, 12:44 am
Posts: 3
According a couple of canoe manufacturers I've spoken with, verolite usually lasts about 20 years if exposed constantly to UV. When I asked those manufacturers what the life of canvas, properly filled and painted, would be if exposed to 20 years of UV (which remember is quite a bit more damaging than in the heyday of wood/canvas boats) the answer was - about 20 years.

So the rule of thumb to all of us should be to keep those canoes covered when they're not being used (UV damages fiberglass, kevlar, and their respective resins also)

If you need to recover the canoe, and want to use something similar to verolite, Noah's have vinyl coated canvas (only in green - but then verolite in red faded out to yellow within a few years).
Any decrease in longevity, in my opinion is more than compensated, when you consider the ease of application of the vinyl-coated canvas - strip off the outwales and keel, strip off the old canvas, inspect the planking (replace any as needed), stretch the new (vinyl-coated) canvas, tack on the new canvas seal the stem ends, reapply the outwales and keel (if wanted) and put the boat back into the water. A one day job if you're quick! No need to wait for filler to dry and be sanded,again, and again; and then wait for paint to dry and be sanded, again and again; and the wait for the whole thing to harden up. All of which is fine if you've got the time, but . . . if you want to be paddling soon, I'd go with the verolite-like material!

Of course, at my age, if I've got to recanvas in 20-30 years, it probably won't matter, 'cause I'll be waiting to paddle the big lakes and rivers upstairs !

That aside, a 20' wood/whatever canoe is just going to be heavy, carry it with at least 2 people.

Good luck

JOHN


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 Post subject: Re: 20' Tremblay
PostPosted: April 7th, 2010, 8:37 pm 
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Joined: August 20th, 2009, 12:44 am
Posts: 3
Oh yeah, I forgot to mention, about weight, 110lbs is for sure a dream, I had an 18' cedar/canvas when I was in my teens - a big 18-footer, and it weighed 134 lbs, dry! But then I was young and even more foolish than I am today - I portaged it by myself, how brain-dead was I? But it paddled like a dream!

Later

JOHN


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