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PostPosted: September 14th, 2013, 2:37 pm 
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Joined: June 28th, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 1810
Location: Freeland, Maryland USA
I’ve been looking for a project boat and finally found one:

http://lancaster.craigslist.org/boa/4057947187.html

It’s in my shop.

1977 HIN, but in excellent condition, with very few bottom scratches; obviously stored inside and gently used.
16’ 5” long (197”) x 29” wide, with should give it a decent L/W ratio.
11 ½” deep at center, 14” deep at decks.
61.5 lbs before gutting, and I think I can take out 10+ lbs of excess.

I need to gut the hull of both seats, both sets of foot pegs/rudder controls and the split foam pillars under the decks. And some other things that were manufacturer-glassed into the hull. I think I can re-use the rudder controls and the pivot, but the rudder blade itself will certainly go – it is a massive chunk of thick stainless steel that is 14” long x 8 ½” wide. I now recall hearing something about the size and shape of Hyperform’s rudder.

It came with two 50” split-pillar float bags, two 33” split-pillar float bags. Even the float bags were clean and sound.

And two 210cm Kober Weltmeister Moldau paddles from the same era as the hull; wood one piece non-take-aparts with 90 degree of set – heavy (3lbs even), with aluminum bang trips, but the wood is very pretty, with some kind of dark veneer on the blades.

Other than some places where the veneer is chipped the paddles look like they were put in storage 35 years ago and never used. Even the varnish is in perfect condition. I have no paddling use for a 3lb 210cm paddle, but I’ll think of something.

If anyone has information about late 70’s Hyperform (Lettmann design) tandem flatwater/cruising kayaks I’d like to know more.


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PostPosted: September 14th, 2013, 3:04 pm 
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Joined: February 19th, 2004, 9:53 pm
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Location: Atlanta
I vaguely remember seeing such things in a Hyperform catalog back in the 70s. They marketed some strange things because they didn't know where the market was.

If I had it, I would convert it to a solo tripping boat similar to the MR Monarch or one of the Kruger designs. The cockpit is the biggest challenge. A skirt big enough for that cockpit would be hard to manage. I might try to change it to a solo cockpit and one or two hatches.


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PostPosted: September 14th, 2013, 4:42 pm 
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Joined: June 28th, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 1810
Location: Freeland, Maryland USA
ezwater wrote:
I vaguely remember seeing such things in a Hyperform catalog back in the 70s. They marketed some strange things because they didn't know where the market was.

If I had it, I would convert it to a solo tripping boat similar to the MR Monarch or one of the Kruger designs. The cockpit is the biggest challenge. A skirt big enough for that cockpit would be hard to manage. I might try to change it to a solo cockpit and one or two hatches.


That is of course my intention.

I know that in the late 70’s Hyperform produced Lettmann (Klaus Lettmann, a German racer and designer) and Prijon hulls in Massachusetts.

The style is similar to the Phoenix Vagabond, but the Hyperform is deeper throughout with taller decks, and a shorter cockpit (80 x 20).

http://www.pokeboat.com/Vagabond.htm

Looking at the boat I am almost certain that it is a glass & nylon hull. I don’t know if Hyperform at the time used Polyester or Vinylester resin, but I’ll stick with epoxy resin for any repairs or outfitting.

The vertical striping that shows through the hull is some kind of flat black cord that is glassed inside every 8 to 12 inches.

It is in amazing condition for a 1977 boat. I’ve pushed and pressed on the hull and tied it down tightly; I think it has essentially been inside for 36 years and without any UV exposure I doubt that it is brittle.

Trying to find text or catalog info from 1977 may prove daunting, but I enjoy learning about the history of boats I rebuild.


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PostPosted: September 14th, 2013, 11:29 pm 
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Location: Atlanta
Hard to say about use of Nylon cloth. Phoenix was one of the first to use Nylon, and used it often. Hard to say about the resin, also, but some very fine modified polyester resins were in use back then, so no reason to be disappointed if it's not vinylester.

If you have to do a cockpit rim, you can use the Tygon tube method. But if you reduce the cockpit size the right way, you may be able to provide a base on which a pre-made rim will fit easily. Just remember to program in enough front-to-back angulation to the cockpit. The more angulation, the easier to shoot your legs in, for any reasonable cockpit length.


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PostPosted: September 15th, 2013, 6:23 am 
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Joined: June 28th, 2001, 7:00 pm
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Location: Freeland, Maryland USA
ezwater wrote:
Hard to say about use of Nylon cloth. Phoenix was one of the first to use Nylon, and used it often. Hard to say about the resin, also, but some very fine modified polyester resins were in use back then, so no reason to be disappointed if it's not vinylester.


I’m all but certain it is a glass and nylon hull. It has pigmented resin on the decks with a clear bottom and the interior is nearly white, which is very similar to the glass/nylon Phoenix Vagabond. Tom Wilson, who started Phoenix, worked for Hyperform in the 70’s.

ezwater wrote:
If you have to do a cockpit rim, you can use the Tygon tube method. But if you reduce the cockpit size the right way, you may be able to provide a base on which a pre-made rim will fit easily. Just remember to program in enough front-to-back angulation to the cockpit. The more angulation, the easier to shoot your legs in, for any reasonable cockpit length.


I’m not clear about what the tygon tubing method is, but it sounds like an outfitting/adaptation trick I could someday use. Details?

The Hyperform does have a cockpit rim, but I’m not thinking of reducing the 80 x 20 dimensions. I like that style of expansive cockpit for ease of getting in and out of the boat and for the convenience of gear storage, especially having an open area behind the seat.

I’m not a fan of spray skirts on boats with huge cockpits; without some kind of (usually awkward) stays or supports they will implode with any real lap-dumping wave, which is a sign that I either need to get off the water or start paying more attention to my windage angle.

I do like having a cockpit sized storage cover to keep the boat and paddling gear dry while in camp and can adapt a rec kayak cover to provide that.

But that’s a ways down the road. I’m jonsing to start gutting the Hyperform (damn I wish I at least knew what that boat was called), but know if I do the 7 half-finished paddles in the shop will remain half-finished.


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