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PostPosted: May 5th, 2014, 1:43 pm 
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Joined: May 4th, 2014, 5:34 pm
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Hey folks, sorry if this is the wrong forum. I looked everything over and saw some similar items in this one.

I bought a 2nd hand Scott Tripper 16' and the paint is very faded but no signs anywhere of damage, so in general in very good condition. I'd like to paint it a different colour, but was wondering whether there is some kind of other finish work that should be done before the paint. And also, what kind of paint do I need and what is the best way to apply it?

I've seen mention of UV treatments - is that something I should do? What does it involve in terms of materials and procedures?


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PostPosted: May 5th, 2014, 2:00 pm 
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Joined: February 19th, 2004, 9:53 pm
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Location: Atlanta
The colored or pigmented outer layer is usually gelcoat in a fiberglass canoe. It is possible that sun exposure might have faded the surface pigment in the gelcoat.

Before getting into the hassle of painting, I suggest going to a marine shop that carries products for restoring the color and sheen of gelcoat, buying some, and trying it out. There's a chance that the original color can be restored.

If you want a different color, of course you'll have to paint it. Remember that while the original gelcoat had some "depth", so that scrapes and scratches could be restored, your different color paint job will be only skin deep.

Some have gone to an auto body shop to have the work done, selecting something with a reputation for durability like Dupont Imron. Marine shops will have alternatives. Others here will have specific suggestions.

My suggestion is skip most of the work, hit it with some gelcoat restorer, and get it on the water.


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PostPosted: May 5th, 2014, 5:08 pm 
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I'll look into what is involved in gelcoat restorer, however I really hate the colour so would not mind a different colour :-)

Is the fading just cosmetic or something to worry about? Like UV penetration?


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PostPosted: May 5th, 2014, 8:07 pm 
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Joined: December 19th, 2006, 8:47 pm
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Location: Rattlesnake Pond ME
Rubbing compound and a power buffer with a polishing pad..

Worked just fine for our oxidized Swift which was so faded that you couldn't really read the label sticker.


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PostPosted: May 6th, 2014, 8:30 am 
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Location: Bancroft, Ontario Canada
Oxidized gelcoat can be restored to some extent by rubbing with a mildly abrasive sink and bathroom cleanser (eg. Comet)... the fine abrasive powder worked to remove the dull surface on a layer of thick gelcoat. The canoe is now matte with no gloss, still not a bad appearance and only about an hour's work with a hose and very little expense. Worth a try.

If you still want to paint afterwards that matte surface should be good to go for a marine enamel such as Interlux Brightside (although some additional sanding could provide more "tooth" for the new paint to bond to).

Without trying Comet, you could wash with detergent, rinse and dry well, sand down to fresh gelcoat and then paint.

Marine products are expensive (some of the expense may be simply added on by printing "marine" on the label). I also tried plain old floor and porch paint and actually prefer it to Brightside. Here in Ontario, Rona's floor and porch enamel reinforced with epoxy results in a tough finish and can be tinted to whatever color you want.

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PostPosted: May 6th, 2014, 9:54 am 
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Oooo, I like the cheap-b**tard sound of that floor paint! Right up my alley!

Thanks for all the tips so far.


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PostPosted: May 6th, 2014, 10:46 am 
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Location: Rattlesnake Pond ME
If you want really cheap and easy..try Rustoleum
Littleredcanoe is a wood canoe covered with dacron with part of it ( the white scuff patch) Rustoleum flat spray on paint.

Enamel unless done well looks just awful. Flat paint is far easier to touch up and the touched up patches do not look glaringly different.


Thats why lrc is white flat paint on the bottom.


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PostPosted: May 6th, 2014, 3:51 pm 
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littleredcanoe wrote:
Thats why lrc is white flat paint on the bottom.


on the bare bottom?
I'll need a photo of that...

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PostPosted: May 6th, 2014, 5:59 pm 
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I bought the expensive 2 part epoxy marine paint when I re-painted my Novacraft Tripper. When it inevitably got scratched on the bottom I found a small can of Armour Coat rust paint at the hardware store with a colour that closely matched my Mason red. Since no paint can withstand scratching on rocks I now wonder why I bothered with the marine paint.

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PostPosted: May 6th, 2014, 9:38 pm 
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Location: Rattlesnake Pond ME
No pic of the bare bottom. The canoe is currently 2000 miles away... Later on the pic.

If you look at Swift Canoes, two tone paint job (actually gel coat) is available. There is a reason for the color..not just being fancy. Neutral greys and whites and beiges hide inevitable scratches better.

The football shaped light paint is called aptly a scuff patch.


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PostPosted: May 6th, 2014, 10:00 pm 
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Joined: July 28th, 2008, 9:29 pm
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Location: Winnipeg
Tremclad is my solution. If they dont have flat paint in your colour of choice you can always add some and mix your own custom colour. Karin is doing that right now with the Canadian, making burgundy with some red, flat black and such. ( It's a secret so I can't give you the exact formula...lol).

We did one boat with brightside and it was truly magnificent. Pricey though. And it shows every little flaw. Tremclad, the matt finish kind, is much more forgiving.

So far I have resisted painting the bottom of my cedar strip. It will need some TLC though shortly as I savaged it on the Rice River last year...crackity snap snap snap. Maybe that can be my fall trip...go up the Rice and make some channels to surf down by picking rocks out.

Christy


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PostPosted: August 27th, 2019, 12:40 am 
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Location: Minden, NV USA
Sometimes gelcoat can be saved but I have never tried it on an older boat.
Once a canoe gets faded, needs a couple of dings repaired and has stripes on the bottom. marine enamel is your best friend. You can spend a lot of money on fancy paint. I really like the Rustolleum topsides marine ename. The Hunter Green has high gloss and looks like a million bucks. $16 a quart instead of 50.


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