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PostPosted: November 18th, 2006, 12:39 am 
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Joined: April 4th, 2004, 3:17 am
Posts: 247
Location: Jämtland, Sweden
Dorian Amos; "The Good Life: Up the Yukon Without a Paddle" and
"The Good Life Gets Better"

A not quite sane Brittish couple emigrate to Canada in search of adventure. When they settle in the Yukon they decide to burn the cabin they just bought since it was crap. As they watch the flames the first snow starts falling...

/Par


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 Post subject: John McPhee
PostPosted: November 18th, 2006, 3:00 pm 
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Joined: September 8th, 2006, 7:11 pm
Posts: 921
Location: winnipeg
I agree with those who nominated Ed Abbey, Dillon Wallace, Barry Lopez, and Bill Mason. Those are some of my favourites.

John MCPhee has written several books, and, while Survival of the Bark Canoe may be most of interest to paddlers, all his books are far more interesting than their subject matter suggests. I particularly enjoyed Uncommon Carriers, recently. It uses transportation to weave a bunch of interesting stories. I believe it will broaden the geographical understanding of anyone who reads it, and it is entertaining as well.

James Raffan's Deep Waters might be one of the most powerful stories I have read. As a leader of youth adventure trips, I consider it to be one of the most important books written.


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PostPosted: November 19th, 2006, 5:19 pm 
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Joined: August 27th, 2002, 7:00 pm
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Location: Geraldton, Ontario Can
Just finished an interesting read "The Island of the Seven Cities" by Paul Chiasson. He puts forward a thesis that the Chinese actually arrived in Canada long before Europeans and set up shop in Cape Breton. Don't laugh, it's not a "Chariot of the Gids" kind of book, it's actually a serious premise that holds some water.
Edited...just did some internet research, looks like pure bunk, too bad, its always fun to buy into a new conspiracy theory.

Komatiq might be interested in this book as there is quite a bit of research related to the Acadians, and the author can actually trace his family back to Port Royal.


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PostPosted: November 19th, 2006, 7:59 pm 
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Location: The Gateway to Woodland Caribou
I am just about finished Deep Water by James Raffan. A very tragic story indeed and involved a local Angus resident as well.

Rob(Haslam), I don't know if this is a must read for you or a must NEVER read considering the school trips you take. I keep thinking of you as I read it and while I will presume you are much more skilled that the leaders of that trip, it is the tragedy that could happen on a trip like that and facing the parents afterwords.

I fought back tears through the entire chapter discussing the events of June 13, 1978.

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Advice is a form of nostalgia; dispensing it is a way of wishing the past from the disposal--wiping it off, painting over the ugly parts, and recycling it for more than it's worth.



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PostPosted: November 19th, 2006, 8:51 pm 
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Location: Geraldton, Ontario Can
I've actually posted a fair amount of entries here about that book. I read it a few years back when it first came out, and I believe it is a must read book for anyone taking kids on trips. Several thoughts in no apparent order....

-I wasn't involved with our club when the disaster happened, but i know that the coroner's report totally revamped the running of our club. At that point, in the late 70's, life jackets were still optional.

-the coroner's report was ineffective, and focused on things that were in my opinion, useless details. The crucial factor behind the disaster was bad decision making by the leaders.

-disasters like this continue to occur, although not on such a large scale...as evidenced by the two girl guides that died in Georgian Bay a year or two ago.

-regulations will soon become so tight because of these tragedies that it will be practically impossible to run canoe trips with and for kids. For example, the Inquiry for the Girl Guide tragedy suggested that all sterns persons on GG canoe trips have their Orca Flatwater credential.

-the regulations currently in place through OPHEA as decreed by Osbie are quite comprehensive, and i live pretty well by them. Risk management is something that primarily occurs before the trip, but decisions have to be made on a daily basis in the field, and common sense and safety first will usually keep the kids safe. My kids go through extensive workshops and pool sessions before the big trip, and i use tragedies like the St John Boys school thing to teach.

The greatest risk to kids on trips, in my opinion, is on land, when we are portaging or setting camp. It ain't Algonquin up here, and things are rough, that's why I carry a chain saw...my biggest fear is a big wind taking out a tree and dropping it on a tent...trouble on the water is minimal...stick close to shore on lakes, and OPHEA has declared that we are not allowed to run rapids any more....

I see kids suffer lifetime injuries on the basketball court or on the hockey rink...blisters and sunburn are usually the worst a well run canoe trip will produce. There will come a time when the litigous nature of our society stops kids from doing any risky activity. I see that as a huge loss. I watch kids develop over the course of four or five years from greenhorns into experienced canoe trippers, capable of running trips, and I think it changes their life for the better.


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PostPosted: November 19th, 2006, 9:30 pm 
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Joined: December 30th, 2003, 11:36 pm
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Location: Kitchener Ontario
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There will come a time when the litigous nature of our society stops kids from doing any risky activity. I see that as a huge loss.


You got that right. To run my 3 off school property trips for my Gr 7 "Voyageurs" club ( Canoe Museum, Day Paddle on the Grand, Cyprus Lake overnighter) I need to take a parent for every kid.

Now, this does have an up side.....last year I took 45 people to Cyprus lake. It builds a LOT of contacts for me with the parent community. But, as anyone who has every run a trip with adults knows..... they are the high maintenance ones!

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Dave

"The way of a canoe is the way of the wilderness, and of a freedom almost forgotten." Sigurd Olson, 1956


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PostPosted: November 20th, 2006, 12:13 pm 
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Joined: August 10th, 2006, 11:50 am
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Location: Toronto
There's no doubt - the book that has helped me the most with canoeing is Bill Mason's Song of the Paddle.

It has everything from gear and places, to places, philosophies, adventures, and more. Hnd he even manages to throw in some humour to his "all-inclusive" guide, as I would call it.

It has definitely been a key part of the skills I have gained that allow me to go out in nature with a canoe and see all these beautiful places. It's a must-read for beginners and even for experienced canoeists.


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