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PostPosted: June 9th, 2003, 2:21 pm 
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Joined: January 14th, 2003, 7:00 pm
Posts: 214
Location: Milwaukee, WI USA
Anybody who's read Dangerous River have any thoughts as to whether old RM found gold in the twenties? I believe he did and kept his mouth shut about it.
That would also explain why it took him until the fifties to write the book.
This, by the way, may be my favorite adventure/canoe story.


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PostPosted: June 9th, 2003, 3:07 pm 
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Joined: April 16th, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 1488
Location: Ontario, Canada
jboudreau01 wrote:
Some of my top favourites are

The Tracker by Tom Brown Jr.
Call of the Wild by Jack London
To Build a fire by Jack London


Particularly, the Tracker. This book totally changed the way I go out and see wilderness. Great read!!! All of Tom Brown's other books are quite good to!

Jeremy

"The Tracker" by Tom Brown Jr. is a favorite of mine as well as his other novel, "The Vision".

I've used all his field guides for many years now and they've become dog-eared and worn. They are:

1) Tom Brown's Field Guide to Wilderness Survival
2) Tom Brown's Field Guide to Nature Oberserving
3) Tom Brown's Field Guide to City and Suburban Survival
4) Tom Brown's Field Guide to Living with the Earth
5) Tom Brown's Guide to Wild Edible and Medicinal Plants
6) Tom Brown's Field Guide to the Forgotten Wilderness

Although they are not canoe related they try to introduce methods to the reader of seeing nature in a different way.

My other favorites are Bill Mason's "Path of the Paddle" and the "Song of the Paddle" which taught me many of the lessons I learned when I first started paddling.

Tom Brown Jr.'s books introduced me to a way to see the outdoors differently. Bill Mason's books introduced me to the vehicle that would allow me to see more of it. Although written by two people with a totally different outlook on the outdoors, I feel that they both harbour the same ideals.

Of special mention is the book:
"How to Shit in the Woods: An Environmentally Sound Approach to a Lost Art"
by Kathleen Meyer. It's a great read as well. Funny and informative.

Dave

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Last edited by Tripper on June 9th, 2003, 7:02 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: June 9th, 2003, 6:11 pm 
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Joined: August 19th, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 729
Location: Simcoe, Ontario Canada
"River Thieves" by Michael Crummey is an excellent read and I am sure will be especially enjoyed by those of you who enjoy things like prospector tents, winter camping and stories of rugged living in the bush. I have always been fascinated by the Beothuk Indians from Newfoundland and this book "fits the bill" perfectly.

The setting is the Bay of Exploits. Crummey tells a gripping story about contact with the Beothuk or "Red Indians" by white settlers and a British naval officer. Intertwined with wilderness living and trapping. One of the best reads I have had in years. It was published in paperback in 2002.

Crummey has written several books of poetry and this, his his first crack at a novel, has won several awards.

Bob

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PostPosted: June 10th, 2003, 10:25 am 
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Joined: May 11th, 2003, 2:57 am
Posts: 561
Location: Burlington On.
"The Best of Field and Stream's 100 Years" is a great collection of short stories with some very funny stuff-Mastodon Stew for one,and the most touching story I've ever read is the last one Return to Tinkhamtown.If you've ever lost a loved one you'd appreciate this story.
Hemingway was a great outdoorsman and really captures the spirit of what lures us to nature.More for fishermen.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: June 10th, 2003, 1:31 pm 
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Joined: July 14th, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 206
Location: Windsor, Ontario Canada
"Into the Wild" - Jon Krakauer

"Deliverance" - James Dickey

"People of the Deer" - Farley Mowat

"Lost Girls" - Andrew Pyper

"Surfacing" - Margaret Atwood

"The Dharma Bums" - Jack Kerouac

All deal with the relationship between the wilderness of the body and the wilderness of the mind.

Great writers, great reads.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: June 10th, 2003, 9:03 pm 
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Joined: June 3rd, 2003, 6:22 pm
Posts: 8
The Strange Tales of Lake Opeongo by Bernard Shaw(not my favorite but one of the books I have recently read)


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 Post subject: favorite wilderness book
PostPosted: June 13th, 2003, 11:34 am 
"Come A long Journey" by Allen Fry, is a wonderful tale about "a whiteman, an indian, and a long stretch of river". On of my favorites, its setting is along the upper reaches of the Yukon River system.


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PostPosted: June 13th, 2003, 12:15 pm 
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Joined: June 24th, 2001, 7:00 pm
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Location: Gatineau, Secteur Hull (Québec)
quest - JEL wrote:
"Come A long Journey" by Allen Fry, is a wonderful tale about "a whiteman, an indian, and a long stretch of river". On of my favorites, its setting is along the upper reaches of the Yukon River system.


Yes, let me second that. I haven't thought about it in years, but it is abeautiful book.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: June 13th, 2003, 2:27 pm 
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Joined: August 7th, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 1018
Location: Duluth, MN USA
I thought I'd stress the classics:

The originals:
Thoreau, Burroughs, Muir
Muir: http://www.sierraclub.org/john_muir_exhibit/

The new originals:
Sig Olson, Bob Marshall, Aldo Leopold, William Douglas
Sig Olson: http://www.uwm.edu/Dept/JMC//Olson/
Bob Marshall wrote only one book "Arctic Village" - I wish he wrote more.

A must read:
The Wilderness Act: http://www.fs.fed.us/htnf/wildact.htm

We might not have much wilderness, but America has had some true visionaries.

Heading north on Sunday. Can't wait.


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 Post subject: Jonny
PostPosted: June 14th, 2003, 10:18 am 
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Joined: June 3rd, 2003, 6:22 pm
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Cmon Jonny Field and Streams, I read that in 3rd grade lets be a little more creative!!


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 Post subject: paddling books
PostPosted: June 17th, 2003, 9:28 pm 
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Joined: June 11th, 2003, 5:10 pm
Posts: 178
Location: Horseshoe Valley, On
At risk of being chased out of here (How many choices do we get?) here we go...

paddling books

Cold Oceans by Jon Turk - attempts to kayak Cape Horn and row the Northwest Passage, and a winter dogsled trip on Baffin Island

The Last River by Todd Balfor - tragedy on a river expedition to China;s Tsangpo Gorge

Running the Amazon by Joe Kane - Great book.

Kayaking the Vermilion Sea by Jonathan Waterman - interesting account of sea-kayaking Baja Sea, with history and ecology thrown in... Makes you jealous hearing how he got all the gear donated...

Day of 2 Sunsets - Michael Blades - Kayaking around Vancouver Island

Trippers' Tales by Russell Smith - light but fun...

Great Voyages in Small Boats - specifically 'Alone at Sea' by Hannes Lindemann - across the Atlantic by kayak in 1956!

history/legend books

The Wildest Rivers, the Oldest Hills - Tales of the Gatineau and Pontiac by Venetia Crawford and Gunda Lambton

Witches, Ghosts and Loups-Garous - Scary Tales from Canada's Ottawa Valley retold by Joan Finnegan

Lastly -

A River Lost - The Life and Death of the Columbia - by Blaine Harden - interesting to read about what we do to our natural resources (from both points of view)

And that's just from the ones I've read - there;s still many more to go... :doh:


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: June 19th, 2003, 12:05 pm 
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Joined: May 29th, 2003, 12:09 pm
Posts: 60
Location: Toronto, Ontario
People of the Deer - Farley Mowat

A Life in the Bush - Roy MacGregor :clap: :clap:

A agree the Silent Spring should be included and if so Sea of Slaughter by Farley Mowat. This one changed me.

The Mason books are a must.

The SAS Survival Guide has some good stuff in it as well.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: June 19th, 2003, 12:35 pm 
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Joined: July 30th, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 66
Location: Cleveland, Ohio USA
Great Heart - James Rugg & ?
Lure of the Labrador Wild - Dillon Wallace
A Walk in the Woods - ?
The Lonely Land - Sigurd Olson


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 Post subject: Re: paddling books
PostPosted: June 19th, 2003, 1:20 pm 
skypuppy wrote:
Great Voyages in Small Boats - specifically 'Alone at Sea' by Hannes


Can't remember the author's name, but "Adrift" is a great book (nothing to do with paddling though). True story of a sailor who's ship sinks and he spends 76 days on the Atlantic in a life raft with minimal supplies.


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 Post subject: Adrift
PostPosted: June 21st, 2003, 8:45 am 
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Joined: June 20th, 2001, 7:00 pm
Posts: 29
Location: Fairfax, Virginia USA
The author of Adrift is Tristan Jones. I like his earlier books, Adrift, The Incedible Voyage, Ice, & Saga of a Wayward Sailor. Again, these are small sailboat sailing not canoeing.

I really like R. M. Patterson's books. I don't think Far Pastures was mentioned. It is more about his dude ranch, but does have some canoeing.

Another favorite is Cache Lake Country (which was mentioned) by John Jay Rowland. A forest cruiser back in the 1940's or 50's. Lots of good general info for living in the woods and being resourseful.

And of course, Siguard Olson & Calvin Rustrum, any of their books.

-- John


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