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PostPosted: June 24th, 2003, 11:45 am 
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Joined: January 15th, 2002, 7:00 pm
Posts: 113
Location: Waterloo, Ontario Canada
Wanderings of an Artist in North America - Paul Kane. Written around 1850 and a very interesting, highly recommended.


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PostPosted: June 24th, 2003, 1:56 pm 
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Joined: February 17th, 2003, 7:00 pm
Posts: 36
Location: Trenton, Ontario Canada
The Collected Works Of Grey Owl. I think that is the title, available at Chapters for $14.99. A great read. His works were written between 1931-36. It is hard to believe that anyone would have thought him to be a native of the time if you look at how well he writes.

He was a true conservationist at a time when no one would have felt that the Canadian wilderness was anything but limitless. What I particularily liked was how he balanced his work as a hunter, trapper and guide with his goal to save the beaver from extinction.

Alton B


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PostPosted: June 24th, 2003, 4:55 pm 
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Joined: March 15th, 2003, 7:00 pm
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Location: THUNDERBAY, Ontario CANADA
Grey owl, Sigurd Olson, Jack London are all amazing. Boundary Waters by Paul Gruchow is a good read and the last book i read called "good morning midnight" by Chip Brown was also really good. :clap:

:evil: GEARBOX :evil:


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PostPosted: June 24th, 2003, 4:57 pm 
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Joined: March 15th, 2003, 7:00 pm
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Location: THUNDERBAY, Ontario CANADA
Farley Mowat and the "Top of the world" series was fantastic





GEARBOX


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PostPosted: June 30th, 2003, 1:01 pm 
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Joined: June 20th, 2001, 7:00 pm
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"Paddling My Own Canoe" by Esther Keyser, published by the Friends of Algonqin Park. Great canoe read while on a trip. Its kinda heavy but the paper seems waterproof.
Now its dawning on my husband that I am not going "to get over it" and will take off on my own now and then till my canoe is too heavy.
Poor Jim
But we will do a trip together for a couple of weeks next month anyway.
My last two solos left me babbling due to a lack of human contact. When I did finally find one we visited for over an hour on the portage!


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PostPosted: December 4th, 2004, 10:07 pm 
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-thought I would see if I could revive an old but excllent thread... Any new book suggestions out there?


I checked out the CCR message board recently to see who liked what books and to get a few book recommendations. One of the authors I decided to try after reading through the site was Grey Owl. By accident, I started out with a biography. The biography, written by Smith and titled “From The land of Shadows” was interesting and did make me want to learn more. I just finished Grey Owl’s first book, “The Men of the Last Frontier”. And, I can’t help thinking we seriously need a modern day Grey Owl to help improve awareness of our wild areas.

I like not only the author’s message but his writing style. For the folks that have not read any of his books, here is a paragraph that I think is typical of his writing, taken from a chapter titled ‘The Fall of the Leaf’.

“The air was filled with the low sound of falling leaves, as they made their hesitant way to earth, adding little by little to a variegated carpet already ankle deep. And as they came spinning, floating, and spiraling down like golden snowflakes, the sound of their continuous, subdued, rustling transformed the stately forest into a shadowed, whispering gallery, in which it seemed as though the ancient trees would tell in muted accents the age-old secrets of days gone by, did but one have the ears to understand.”


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PostPosted: December 5th, 2004, 12:06 am 
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Joined: December 30th, 2003, 11:36 pm
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Location: Kitchener Ontario
Posted this list in another thread.........

Anything by Sigurd Olson ( especially "Singing Wilderness" or " The Lonely Land")

Sam Cook ( Up North, Camp Sights etc)

Grey Owl ( Tales of an Empty Cabin etc)

McPhee ( Survival of the Bark Canoe)

Eric Morse ( Freshwater Saga, Fur Trade Routes then and Now)

C.E.S. Franks ( The Canoe and White Water)

Jerry Dennis ( From a Wooden Canoe)

Monte Hummel ( Wintergreen - Reflections from Loon Lake)

Standfield and Lundell ( Stories from the Bow Seat)

Edward Abbey ( Desert Solitare) - it might change your life !

John Jerome ( Stone Work, Blue Rooms)

Jean Aspen ( Arctic Daughter)

Brower ( The Starship and the Canoe)

Robert Kimber ( A Canoeists Sketchbook)

Eric Sevared ( Canoeing with the Cree)

James Dickey ( Deliverance)

John Rowlands ( Cache Lake Country)

John D. Robins ( The Incomplete Anglers)

These are a few to start with.................

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Dave

"The way of a canoe is the way of the wilderness, and of a freedom almost forgotten." Sigurd Olson, 1956


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PostPosted: December 5th, 2004, 11:19 am 
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Joined: September 26th, 2004, 7:13 pm
Posts: 134
Location: Southern Ontario
Here are a few good books that I've read over the years.

Clan Of the Cave Bear
Valley Of The Horses
The Mammoth Hunters
Plains Of Passage
all by Jean Auel
The Journey by James Michener
Alaska also James Michener
Farfarer by Farley Mowat
The list could go on and on but....... :)

Stormy.


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PostPosted: December 5th, 2004, 11:26 am 
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Joined: September 26th, 2004, 7:13 pm
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Location: Southern Ontario
[quote=".Ranger"]-thought I would see if I could revive an old but excllent thread... Any new book suggestions out there?


Try " No Man's River " by Farley Mowat.

Stormy.


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PostPosted: December 5th, 2004, 1:06 pm 
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Joined: October 16th, 2004, 7:30 am
Posts: 226
Location: Truth or Consequences, New Mexico
Calvin Rustrum has been my insiration for 40 years. "Paradice Below Zero" :clap: set me off on an adventure that lasted 16 years.

Greg Alllen


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PostPosted: December 5th, 2004, 6:01 pm 
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Joined: March 13th, 2004, 8:11 am
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Location: Northern Edge of Vermont
The thinking about the title of this thread made me recall the reading I did as a child, reading that helped me survive and that fostered my love of animals and nature.

I think in grade school I read all Jack London's stuff, but in third grade I remember voraciously devouring every book I could find by Jim Kjelgaard. I also remember reading Gentle Ben, by Walt Morey, and Old Yeller by Fred Gipson.

None of these books are on my shelves now, but the memories sure have lingered for 35 years and counting.

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Steve Boal

Most of the world's political, social, and environmental problems have the same root cause: human overpopulation. By 2050 or so, the world population is expected to reach nine billion.


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PostPosted: December 5th, 2004, 9:11 pm 
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Joined: October 29th, 2001, 7:00 pm
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Location: Peterborough, Ontario Canada
Two books I enjoyed are In The North Of Our Lives by Christopher Norment and Summer North Of Sixty by James Raffan.


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PostPosted: December 5th, 2004, 9:44 pm 
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Posts: 136
Location: Guelph, Ont.
"As I Walked Out One Midsummer Morning" by Laurie Lee and "A Time of Gifts" by Patrick Lee Fermor, both a couple of pieces of distinguished literature about backpacking around Spain and Germany respectively in the '30's.

"Nanga Parbat" by Herlighoffer(?) about the 1951 solo conquest of the Himalayan peak by Herman Buhl. "Seven Years in Tibet" by Heinrich Harrer...despite it being made into a Brad Pitt "star vehicle" movie, the story is an incredible one of two Germans hiking up onto a 16,000 foot plateau and surviviing the most severe winter conditions in order to escape from a British POW camp...eventually they are put into the service of the Dalai Lama, not leaving until the Chinese invasion of Tibet in 1950.

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Think globally; explore locally.


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PostPosted: December 6th, 2004, 8:57 pm 
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Location: Plainfield, Indiana USA
Fire in the bones by James Raffan an autobiography on Bill Mason
Cold Burialby Clive Powell-Williams a story of the death of Jack Hornby, Harold Adlard and Edgar Christian on the Thelon River during the winter.
Three Seasons in the Wind by Kathleen & Michael Pitt a story of wintering over on the Thelon River
Paddle to the Arctic and Paddle to the Amazon by Don Starkell, entertaining stories of travel and mistakes made.


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PostPosted: December 6th, 2004, 10:18 pm 
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Joined: August 19th, 2001, 7:00 pm
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Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario Canada
(Richard: Maybe we need a "Books and Movies" Forum?)

Ditto for many of the selections listed in this thread.

For those who are serious about northern books about wilderness travel, northern history and northern culture, the finest collection of titles for sale that I know of are sold by George Luste’s "Northern Books" company. His catalogue is magnificent, including many rare titles. He does a mail order business. His website is:
http://members.tripod.com/northernbooks/home.html

He does not have his catalogue posted on the website, so you will have to contact him. His e-mail is on the web link. Those who go to the WCA annual symposium are familiar with it already.

In addition to the many fine titles already posted, I wish to recommend two books I read while on the river over the past two summers. I like them both because they document authentic travel with encounters of peoples who fully retained the last of the true bush skills, at the end of an era, (1920’s - 1930’s), when some of the People were still living in tipis, hunting, fishing and trapping for a living.

"Sleeping Island" by P.G. Downes, 1943. It takes place in 1938, which was truly the end of an era. He was a hard core traveler, and he traveled into the Neultin Lake country when the area still was not mapped. It is also a true period piece, containing nuances of the cultural attitudes of the day, some of which might be considered politically incorrect today, but important to know about since they are part of our past.

"The Land of Feast and Famine", by Helge Ingstad, 1933. Authentic bush travel and living, summer and winter up around southeast Great Slave Lake and the Taltson River area, in the 1920's, at the end of an era, before the planes and motors arrived. The winter travel accounts are incredible. This adventure traveler literally documented the disappearance of the last of the "Caribou Eater’s" culture, as influenza and TB swept through communities and changed the north forever. Most Canadians have no idea of the history and cultures of this part of our country. Fascinating reading, especially with respect to the often startling cultural/racial/gender attitudes of the day (amongst all groups), which were considered normal at that time.

Another collection not yet mentioned is Peter C. Newman’s trilogy: "Company of Adventurers". Book 1 is "Company of Adventurers". Book 2 is "Caesars of the Wilderness", and Book 3 I forget what it is called (I did not read #3). Anyways the first 2 books should be required reading for all high school students in Canada. They are the history of Canada after contact, largely determined by the canoe and fur trade routes, forts, commerce and business interests, entrepreneurs and adventurers of the day. The first two books document the history of the fur trade, Northwest Company, Hudson’s Bay Company, and the development of political interests, many of which were determined by where the canoe routes and historic height of land portages were, and who got to them first (Brits, French or Yanks). The French made the ultimate mistake by not listening to nor financing Raddisson and Grosselier, who then went to the Brits with their business plan. David Thompson, the greatest surveyor who ever lived. It summarizes nicely John Franklin’s mistakes, and the incredible contrast of Dr. John Rae, a real hero, often forgotten by history who learned how to travel the smart way with indigenous technology and skills. Rebellions, wars, political intrigue, all largely related to the canoe, portage, snowshoe and dogsled. A must-read.


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