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PostPosted: December 6th, 2004, 10:53 pm 
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The poems of Robert Service have always meant a lot to me, and many refer/relate to wilderness settings.


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PostPosted: December 7th, 2004, 1:29 pm 
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[quote="Watersong"]Posted this list in another thread.........

Anything by Sigurd Olson ( especially "Singing Wilderness" or " The Lonely Land") Gotta agree here

Eric Morse ( Freshwater Saga, Fur Trade Routes then and Now) Yep, another good one

Jerry Dennis ( From a Wooden Canoe) WHAT??? You Canadians read our local Michigan Author. Jerry wrote the canoeing book for Michigan (Canoeing Michigan Rivers). His fly fishing books and The Living Great Lakes are equally good.


How about

Jennings, Hodgins and Small (The Canoe in Canadian Cultures)

Aldo Leopold (A Sand County Almanac)

Bill Riviere - (The Open Canoe, and Pole, Paddle and Portage)

PK


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PostPosted: December 7th, 2004, 1:44 pm 
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Steve Galehouse wrote:
The poems of Robert Service have always meant a lot to me, and many refer/relate to wilderness settings.


Steve, you need to go to Dawson City in the Yukon Territory. Robert Service did some of his most famous writing up there... The Cremation of Sam McGee and The Shooting of Dan McGrew. But the Robert Service Cabin is well worth the time of stopping to see it. In the summer an actor reads his writing around a campfire. A very cool place to visit.

PK


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PostPosted: December 7th, 2004, 5:26 pm 
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The Lonely Land - Sigurd Olsen: Olsen's writing style is simple yet elegant, conveying both his profound love and respect of the land and it's history. Of all of his writings, I prefer this it for it's pure story telling.

The Incomplete Anglers - John Robins: A very amusing story about the exploits of a pair of heroically ordinary men on a canoe trip through the Algonquin of the in the 1930's (?). A great read!

Joe Lavalley and the Paleface - Bernard Wicksteed: A simple story that recounts Wicksteed's chance to relive his boyhood dream of paddling through the north with a real "Indian". From a bar in a New York hotel celebrating VE Day (following WWII) one day, to standing by the train station in Algonquin about to meet his guide Joe Lavalley the next, the story is a joy.

There are others (Should I include Lord of the Rings soley on the grounds of the Elvish "Boats" (or were they really canoes???)), Paddle to the Amazon, Paddle to the Arctic (Don Starkell), Fire In The Bones (James Raffan).

Another bit of literature, more obscure for want of formal publishing, but no less enjoyable to read, are the countless personal trip logs that are scattered throughout the web. Two prolific writers, Norm Hooper and Jim Hegyi, have written several very good journals of their various trips through some of the more familar locations around Ontario (http://www.canoestories.com/index.html).

I'd love to see a discussion of peoples' favorite trip logs, the more pictures and prose the better.

Chard


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PostPosted: December 7th, 2004, 7:15 pm 
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HOOP_ wrote:
Richard: Maybe we need a "Books and Movies" Forum?

Or how about an interactive database? People could enter the titles of books, with as much information as possible, along with a summary of the book. Then, other people who have read the books could rate each one....1 paddle for "not so good" to 5 paddles for "great". Not asking much, huh? :lol:

Chard wrote:
Another bit of literature, more obscure for want of formal publishing, but no less enjoyable to read, are the countless personal trip logs that are scattered throughout the web.

I love reading trip logs. And the more photos the better!

Have you read Bill Layman's trip logs?
http://www.out-there.com/BL.htm

One place to find trip logs, albeit only for Algonquin Park, is www.algonquinadventures.com Check under "Trip Logs", "Trails" (Day Hiking and Interior), and under "Photos" check out "Photo Storage" and "Photo Shows", in addition to the other photo headings, for some "trip logs". Some of the reading is dry, but most of them are entertaining and have great photos.

Barbara

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PostPosted: December 7th, 2004, 9:52 pm 
Just read Bill Layman's trip journals and agree with the above mention, and esp. The Lonely Land by Sigurd Olson. Jerry Dennis too. Patterson, Rutstrum, Mowat , my God we're rich. The Complete Willderness Paddler by Peach and Rug (Davidson & Rugge) is worth another mention for the humor.

Strangers Devour The Land by Boyce Richardson (Cree vs. capitalism). Weep.
James Bay By Boyce Richardson - Both books about 30 years old but a good
preview of what will ultimately happen when hydro dams will be allowed to proliferate throughout Ontario.

Against Straight Lines by Robert Perkins
Into the Great Solitude -An Arctic Journey by Robert Perkins - he will be at the Wilderness Canoe Symposium for those lucky enough to be there, I wouldn't miss him. Whilst reading they seem just good stories but in the end they hit me like a sledgehammer.

The Friendly Arctic by Vilhjalmur Stefansson
My Life With The Eskimo by Vilhjalmur Stefansson , maybe not as good as Farley Mowat stories but written in the early 1900's when the Copper Eskimos, their resources and culture were still strong. Stefansson's writings built a bridge of understanding for me

Stranger in the Forest -On Foot Across Borneo by Eric Hanson. I loved the humor and empathy. Another great story written just in time. Rain forest dwellers about to meet the incomprehensible world of hardwood lumber prices and bulldozers.


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PostPosted: December 7th, 2004, 9:59 pm 
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If you are willing to extend the boundaries of widerness to the natural world in general, then any of the compilations of essays by Lewis Thomas or Loren Eiseley would qualify by me.

Steve


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PostPosted: December 9th, 2004, 9:19 pm 
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1. A Sand County Almanac - Aldo Leopold ( a must read for anyone concerned with conservation issues)

2. Men For the Mountains & Switchbacks - Sid Marty ( recounting life as a park warden in the rocky mountain national parks.

However, when I'm on a trip, my reading usually ends up being the information section on the back of my canoe routes map!


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PostPosted: December 9th, 2004, 11:40 pm 
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One Cosmic Instant - Man's Fleeting Supremacy by John A. Livingston
Written in 1973 this book, much like Silent Spring and Sand County Almanac, is still relevent and speaks to "Man's" place in and influence on the environment. These books were the proverbial canaies in the mineshaft.

The Right Mountain - Lessons from Everest On the Real Meaning of Success by Jim Hayhurst Sr. The Author and his son are part of a Canadian expedtion on Everest, and he relates the lessons learned to his/ our daily lives.

Fiction:
The Pond by Robert Murphy. This book is about a boy and his experiences in the early part of the nineteen hundreds as he explores the lands and waters around a hunt/ fish cottage his families owns. This is a book my dad would read to me at bedtime and I still read from time to time.

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PostPosted: December 9th, 2004, 11:46 pm 
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Anything by Edward Abbey.........Desert Solitare, etc. Am reading his biography right now, "Epitaph for a desert anarchist"

Great read..........I lovethis guy, and wonder what he would say about plans to develop Canada's North???

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"The way of a canoe is the way of the wilderness, and of a freedom almost forgotten." Sigurd Olson, 1956


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PostPosted: December 10th, 2004, 8:49 am 
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Into Thin Air - Jon Krakauer

Its gripping and reminds you how inferior humans are to mother nature.

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PostPosted: December 10th, 2004, 9:32 am 
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Thanks for reviving my old thread : )

I have 2 books to add to the list. I haven' read them yet though. But I would love to shortly:

Paddle to the Sea by Holling C. Holling

and

Between a Rock and a Hard Place by Aron Ralston

did anybody see the dateline special on this guy back in september??? Probably the best survival story I have ever encountered!!!!!


Jeremy


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PostPosted: December 10th, 2004, 1:45 pm 
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So many good books mentioned. One that i'd add as an enjoyable read is "Coke Stop in Emo" by ____ Ross. Tpyical story i enjoy reading.... of young guy trying to find himself by canoeing across Canada, solo. I think it took 2 years. Its an easy read as it is writtten in small anecodotal chapter entries. He writes well, is insightful, honest, funny etc. One story on Lake Winnipeg will blow you away, no pun intended. It is a life and death situation with Divine intervention.....or one damn big coincidence. Worth the read.


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PostPosted: December 10th, 2004, 3:03 pm 
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Yes and Yes to most of the titles presented. I think one that merits including that has not been previously mentioned is, KLONDIKE MIKE, An Alaskan Odyssey., by Merrill Denison. First published in 1943, and now out of print I believe, but well worth the search at used book stores or libraries. It's the true story Mike Mahoney, real life inspiration to the likes of Jack London and Robert Service. To be specific, you will find him in Burning Daylight and other of London's stories of the North. At least one of his adventures seems to have served as the inspiration for one of Robert Service's best known poems, "The Cremation of Sam McGee." The time frame is 1897 - 1910 or so, during the Klondike, Fairbanks, Nome, and Iditarod gold rush days. Mahoney was a young Canadian from the Quebec region who found his way to the Yukon, built his reputation, made a fortune, and later moved back to Ottawa and became a very successful busnessman there. Life is good!

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PostPosted: December 11th, 2004, 2:28 pm 
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Reading is like paddling. There are so many great books to read ,so many rivers to paddle and not enough time !!!!!!

Stormy.


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