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 Post subject: Good books
PostPosted: December 13th, 2004, 3:00 pm 
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Joined: October 16th, 2004, 11:11 am
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Location: Wakefield, Quebec
Yes and Yes.
Paddle to the Sea - Holling, a long long time ago, the 'beginnings'
and Into Thin Air - Krakauer, more recently, what a few men were born to do with their supreme bodies and focused minds.

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PostPosted: December 15th, 2004, 12:20 am 
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Joined: April 14th, 2004, 4:26 pm
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Location: Toronto
Lost in the Barrens and Curse of the Viking Grave; they are the only two books i can remember my father reading to me

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 Post subject: Here are 4.
PostPosted: December 15th, 2004, 9:03 am 
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Joined: June 20th, 2001, 7:00 pm
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Location: Pefferlaw, Ontario & Melissa Ontario, Canada
1) Algonquin Adventure - James Dickson.
A story about a trip up the Oxtounge River back in the late 1800's.

2) The Night The Mice Danced The Quadrille - Thomas Osborne.
A story about 5 years spent in the backwoods of Muskoka back in the late 1800's.

3) The Last River - Todd Balf
4) Courting The Diamond Sow - Wickliffe W. Walker
Both of these books are about the 1998 Tsangpo Expedition (first desent of the Tsangpo river in Tibet) that resulted in the death of one of the paddlers. Two differant perspectives of that expedition.

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Last edited by Al Baars on December 20th, 2004, 3:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: December 15th, 2004, 12:40 pm 
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Location: Halfmoon Bay BC
Deep Survival by Lawrence Gonzales- Who lives Who Dies and Why.
a cross between science/psychology and fabulous survival stories.


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PostPosted: December 16th, 2004, 8:43 pm 
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Joined: September 12th, 2004, 7:08 pm
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Location: Kitchener
"A World Of My Own" by Mike Tomkies is my all time favourite, I've read it at least 6 times over the years. Other good books are "Wilderness Seasons" by Ian & Sally Wilson, "North Runner", and "Secret go the Wolves" , by RD Lawrence. Bradford Angier has some good books out as well.


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 Post subject: Nahanni Trailhead
PostPosted: December 17th, 2004, 1:02 am 
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Joined: June 23rd, 2004, 10:29 pm
Posts: 31
Location: Western Manitoba
Some outstanding books already mentionned. I highly recommend Nahanni Trailhead by Joanne Rohan Moore, a Queen's education grad who spent one full year at the headwaters of the Nahanni in the late 70s to mid 80s after being inspired by RM Patterson's tales.

Anyway, her and her mate flew in their gear, supplies, some tools, and a canoe. Build a sturdy cabin, wintered it out, and then canoed the Nahanni in the spring to egress. One of those good reads that once you pick it up, it is very difficult to put down. So wait until after the holidays so you don't tick the family off by ignoring them while you devour another outdoor adventure book.


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PostPosted: April 24th, 2005, 7:55 am 
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Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario Canada
Just finished: “North to Cree Lake: The rugged lives of the trappers who leave civilization behind”, by A.L. Karras. It is an account of trapping and living and traveling the bush in northern Saskatchewan in the 1930’s. Young Karras and his brother left the Depression era prairies, and headed north into the boreal forest and lake country, beyond the roads. It is a fascinating account of the last of the golden age, before roads, and when bush planes were just beginning to be used. Outboard motors were only entering the scene near the end of the ‘30’s. Most of the account is via paddling and snowshoes, without gas or motors.

If you like real life tales of ascending rivers and entering new country without maps, snowshoeing and dog mushing, cabin building, trapping, fishing and hunting for survival, then this is a book you will enjoy.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: April 24th, 2005, 9:00 am 
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Joined: June 21st, 2001, 7:00 pm
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Location: Canada
Previously referenced in this thread but of particular interest are the exploits of David Thompson. A web search will provide much information.

Also previously listed but deserving of special mention are Davidson and Rugge's The Complete Wilderness Paddler and Morse' Fur Trade Canoe Routes of Canada / Then and Now

David Thompson

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: April 24th, 2005, 9:23 am 
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Location: Canada
A truly astounding feat, though neither a typical nor atypical wilderness adventure, is Slavomir Rawicz' The Long Walk. Absolutely engrossing, with hardship virtually unimaginable to us pampered North Americans. Read it.

The Long Walk

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PostPosted: April 24th, 2005, 9:51 am 
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I have many favourites and one is "Touching My Father's Soul" by Jamling Norgay. It is about his personal journey on Everest, The Imax Expedition and life as the son of a famous Sherpa.

Why? Well many reasons but the big one - I was reading it the night the house burned down. I wasn't far into the book but had just read about his grandfather & spirituality... the grandfather getting rid of all his possessions and living a very simple life in the mountains. Well when you lose everything you own like Bryan and I did - thinking about it from a more spiritual perspective really got me through one of the worst ordeals of my life.


Last edited by Laurie March on April 24th, 2005, 11:59 am, edited 2 times in total.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: April 24th, 2005, 10:25 am 
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Location: Sunny Wasaga Beach
mobax wrote:
Also previously listed but deserving of special mention are Davidson and Rugge's The Complete Wilderness Paddler u]David Thompson[/u]

This book, IMHO, has the very best description of canoeing map reading and its pitfalls.
:clap:

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: April 24th, 2005, 2:16 pm 
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Joined: August 16th, 2004, 7:00 am
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Location: Burlington
Walden Life in the Woods --- Minimilist rule......now if I can just get my wife to read it!!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: September 7th, 2005, 12:38 am 
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Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario Canada
This summer on a canoe trip, I read: "Epic Wanderer: David Thompson and the Mapping of the Canadian West", by D'Arcy Jenish.

This is the biography of David Thompson, the worlds greatest surveyor and map maker. His trips were incredible, and his life was unbelievably adventurous. You have to read about it. Yet again many amazing stories we never heard about in history class. If only Canadian kids were taught this stuff in school.

At the peak of his paddling career he spanned the corresponding epoch of the Hudson's Bay Company and the Northwest Company. Later he was the guy who played a major role as a surveyor in much of the Canada-US border surveys, including the last area to be settled which is the Boundary Waters where I live in Northwestern Ontario.

Lots of other history in there about the border surveys. If the Brits had only listened to Thompson, we may have had the Oregon territory (US pacific northwest) in Canada. If they had listened to him the Lake Superior border might have been further south. The great mystery of the Isle Royale rip-off in lake Superior was finally explained to me (should be in Canada as it is north of the Pigeon River and just offshore from Thunder Bay).

I won’t give away the ending to Thompson’s story. You have to read it.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: September 7th, 2005, 9:35 pm 
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Joined: June 23rd, 2001, 7:00 pm
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Location: Newmarket, Ontario Canada
my husband likes books about the history of time, maps, calendars etc., as well as the historyof the hudsons bay company. Might he enoy this one?

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: September 7th, 2005, 9:40 pm 
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Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario Canada
Oh ya! He'll like it.


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